Into the Bronze Age: June 1970 (Part 4)

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Welcome to the fourth and final installment of my coverage of June 1970.  I’ve got an interesting pair of stories for you, so let’s get right to it, shall we?

Roll Call (You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #389
  • Aquaman #51
  • Batman #222
  • Detective Comics #400
  • The Flash #198
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #77
  • Justice League #81
  • Phantom Stranger #7
  • Showcase #91
  • Teen Titans #27
  • World’s Finest #194

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.

Teen Titans #27

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Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Nick Cardy
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda

Well, I wasn’t looking forward to this one; I’ll admit it.  Despite that, I also have to admit that this issue isn’t as bad as the previous one, though the stupidity of that story hangs around this one’s neck like an albatross.  This story is just…odd.  It is decidedly NOT a Teen Titans tale.  This is one of those late 60s space exploration movies, the ones that attempted to stay close to science fact.  You could easily pull the Titans out of this book and replace them with any generic space explorers, and it wouldn’t affect the plot one bit.  They don’t use their powers, they don’t don their costumes, and they don’t really DO anything.

Essentially, this entire story is marking time and reversing the unparalleled idiocy displayed by Mal last issue.  His pointless gesture of needless self-sacrifice, sneaking aboard to pilot a remote controlled space shot for Venus, prompts a frantic effort to save his demonstrably worthless hide.  The space program embarks on a crash construction project to create a new spacecraft to intercept and rescue Mal, saving him from his own stupidity.  (And you thought they went to a lot of trouble to save Mark Watney!)  The Titans are chosen to crew it instead of, you know, someone qualified.  They debate the worthiness of the young man’s actions as they prepare, somehow treating this whole ridiculous situation as if it had even the slightest shred of justification.  The best defense that his supporters can marshal is that Mal is ‘doing his thing.’  Yeah.  Great.  That’s tremendously compelling.

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I suppose I may be letting my bitterness about how asinine this entire story-line is show through a bit too much here.  I’m sorry, but as I’ve said, if there’s one thing I can’t stand, it’s logical inconsistency.  Well, the powers that be get the rocket built in time, and the Titans blast off, dropping a team off at the Moon for no discernible reason while Dove mans the controls of the main module, awaiting their rendezvous with Mal’s ship.  We get a two page roundup of the last several issues, and then we’re back in the present, and the present is mostly space procedural stuff.  You’ve got various readings being taken and reported, orders shouted, numbers and tossed back and forth, the usual.  Clearly, as we discovered with that Robin tale a while back, NASA and Apollo are on the brain for the creators and fans of 1970.

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Speedy, Hawk, and Wonder Girl (or generic astronaut’s 1, 2, and 3), the Moon team, land for their vague mission, but they discover that the materials left behind by Apollo 11 have mysteriously vanished!  The boys head out to search the area while the Amazing Amazon holds the fort.  The search proves fruitless, but when the two teens come back to the LM, they discover that the Lady Vanishes!  That’s right, Wonder Girl has disappeared as mysteriously as the Apollo 11 gear.

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Meanwhile, Kid Flash and deadweight, err, I mean Lilith, meet up with Mal.  The Fastest Teen Alive spacewalks to rescue their friend, but his tether to the module snaps.  He has to pilot them across space with a small jet propulsion device.  That’s right, he pulled an Iron Man, predating The Martian by about 40 years.

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We cut back to the Moon as those kids make their way back to the main craft, and we discover that a group of rather cool looking aliens, too well designed for the minor role they’re given, are the source of the strange happenings on Luna.  They appear carrying all of the missing items, including an unharmed Wonder Girl.  The creatures turn out to be friendly, and they share their story, which involved them leaving their home world to pursue strange radio signals, only to crash-land on Earth’s satellite.  They took the devices left behind by Apollo 11 to try to repair their ship, but when Wonder Girl explained things to them, they brought everything back.

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The kids depart, promising to send help soon (Superman could just give them a tow, I suppose), and all of the disparate craft link up, prompting their return journey, but not before Kid Flash earns some chauvinist points by responding to Wonder Girl’s statement that she was so happy to see him that she could kiss him by saying “Just like a doll!  Thinking of kisses when we’re still over the Moon!”  Classy Wally.

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On the way home, their oxygen mixture is off, and it drives them temporarily mad, setting them at each other’s throats.  Fortunately, the young speedster manages to have enough presence of mind to fix the problem, and they all make it home, safe and sound, where Mal will surely be thrown in jail for the rest of his natural life for stealing a multi-million dollar spacecraft and causing the expenditure of untold further sums to rescue his stupid self….at least, if there were any justice in the world…We end with an ambiguous tease for next issue that features little more than a woman screaming.

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This wasn’t a bad issue, taken strictly on its own merits, but not much happened and it was not, as I said, really a Teen Titans story.  The Nick Cardy art is beautiful, of course, though it makes me miss his Aquaman stories a bit.  This tale is fairly realistic, minus the aliens, and the attention to scientific detail, as well as the connections to the real and recent history of the space program, was surprising.  Unfortunately, it didn’t make for the most gripping of stories.  Of course, the whole of it is weighted down by the fact that the event that drives all of the action is insufferably stupid.  I’m looking forward to this current direction changing, as it doesn’t have much to recommend it.  The idea of these young heroes having to wrestle with the consequences of their actions is a promising one.  We’ve just seen an incredible movie dealing with the similar themes of the consequences of the use of powers in the form of Captain America: Civil War.  Clearly, the idea has legs.  This odd, pointless set of tales, however, aren’t worthy of setup.  I’ll give this particular story 2 Minutemen.  I’m taking off half a Minute for Mal’s imbecility.

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World’s Finest #194

World's_Finest_Comics_194.jpgCover Artist: Kurt Swan
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

This was a surprisingly fun story.  I read it a while back, and it didn’t make a big impression on me.  It is by no means the height of comic craft, but it is definitely solid quality Zaney Haney, fun and not too insane.  It holds together reasonably well and displays Haney’s mastery of creating interesting, memorable one-shot characters.  The tale features the World’s Finest team with all of their vast power facing off against the overwhelming threat of…the Mafia?  That’s right, we continue this month’s trend of superheroes fighting non-super threats.  At least this feels somewhat fitting for Batman, and it also seems like the type of thing that Superman would involve himself in if it was necessary.  He’s really a ‘no job too small’ kind of guy.

The issue opens with young Dick Grayson doing a familiar act, but one which the world has not seen for some time.  He is back as the last member of the Flying Graysons, performing at a circus for charity.  At the same time, Batman is there, keeping an eye out for anything untoward, as the circus owner, a fellow named P.J. Farnum (get it?) has been pressured by the mob.  Suddenly, while Batman is distracted by a hood threatening Mr. Farnum, the Teen Wonder finds himself facing the same deadly fate that claimed his family!  The wires for his high-flying act have been sabotaged, and he begins plummeting through the air.  He hits the safety net, but it too has been cut!  The last Grayson continues his perilous plunge toward a seemingly intractable fate, but at the last moment he is rescued by…a clown?!?

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That’s right, Superman was on hand as backup, undercover as a clown puttering around the ring in a little car.  It’s a fun visual to see Superman half in the disguise, looking goofy, but smiling and waving to the crowd.  There’s something rather fitting for the Man of Steel, that he would be so unconcerned with his appearance and reputation that he would dress up in a silly costume and hang around in the background, getting no attention and no accolades.  It’s silly, but it’s rather nice.

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Unfortunately, the mafioso responsible for this “accident” slipped away, but he is only a small fish in a the growing problem of the Mafia.  The World’s Finest team decide that they must put a stop to this sinister organization, and they point out that it isn’t just a matter of busting heads, as these guys are professionals, very slick and very careful.  Even if they catch the rank and file goons, the organization continues because the folks at the top are protected by the law, seemingly being legitimate businessmen.  Of course, one would be forgiven for thinking that this really shouldn’t be that much of a problem for Batman, who could just make the mob leader cry like little girls, whether he could prove anything or not, but we’re still dealing with a fairly Silver Age-y Batman here, one who lounges around eating oranges while Hanging out with Superman, and who also plays much more by the rules.

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Anyway, the heroes decide to have the World’s Greatest Detective and master of disguise infiltrate the Mob…ohh, wait, no, they decide to have Superman do that…yep, Superman disguises himself as a forger and arranges an ‘introduction’ to the mob by faking a job on one of their banks.  His chutzpah and skills impress the boss, and he gets an introduction to Karl Lukaz, the “Big Uncle” who runs the organization, a rather distinctive looking fellow with an eye-patch and a soft spot for canaries.  It is in this fellow that we see Haney’s ability to create memorable supporting characters for these brief, passing roles.  However, the boss of bosses doesn’t welcome the incognito Man of Tomorrow with open arms.  No, he has to pass a loyalty test.  Now, what would be a fitting test for a forger?  Perhaps, forging something?  No, no, nothing so mundane.  Lukaz wants his new friend to murder Bruce Wayne!  Dun dun, dunnnnn!

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That’s right, he wants the forger to do some contract killing.  How did this guy end up running a criminal empire?  Every manager worth his salt knows you should let employees stick to their specialties!  Well, the disguised Metropolis Marvel arranges with his friend for Bruce Wayne to be “killed” during a charity polo match, and the supposed playboy billionaire’s horse is quietly tranquilized, sending him on a terrible tumble.

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Despite “Big Uncle” pulling a surprise inspection of Wayne’s body in the morgue, the deception holds, thanks to Batman’s foresight.  For his troubles, Clark learns of a secret stash of evidence that Lukaz uses to ensure the loyalty of his “nephews,” a stash that would provide the authorities just what they need to take the entire organization down.  The hero bends all of his efforts to locating this Damoclean Sword of evidence, but despite using his abilities in many clever and creative ways (subtly scanning with x-ray vision, reading computer tapes with microscopic vision, and more) he has no luck.  It seems “Big Uncle” is too smart to leave his Achilles Heel unprotected.

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Meanwhile, Batman is beginning to act a bit strangely.  It seems the fall from his horse didn’t do him any favors, and he is having terrible head pains.  Nevertheless, at Superman’s urging, the Dark Knight agrees to infiltrate the Mob as well.  One does wonder why this wasn’t the first plan.  After passing Lukaz’s test with some quick thinking and smooth talking, Batman is in position, but his efforts also turn up nothing, so the pair decide to put “Big Uncle” on ice in the Fortress of Solitude and have the Masked Manhunter take his place in hopes of weaseling the information they need out of Lukaz’s lieutenants.

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I love the thought of Superman just dropping a criminal off in the Fortress.  It’s hilarious and strangely sensible.  After all, where are they going to go?  Anyway, a meeting of the major crime bosses sees Batman’s head-trauma bear bizarre fruit, as he shows up in costume, but still disguised as Lukaz.  What’s more, he exposes Superman and presents him with a kryptonite funeral wreath, leaving us on a strange cliff-hanger!  What has happened to the World’s Greatest Detective and what will become of the World’s Finest team?!

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This was a fun issue, though it was a bit odd and silly around the edges.  The idea that Superman would be the one to go undercover really is rather strange, especially since his partner is the World’s Greatest Detective.  It does feel a bit like burying the lead.  Despite that, I enjoyed seeing Clark having to reason his way through his challenges, using his powers in subtle, careful, and thoughtful ways.  He can’t just punch his way through this problem.  Instead, he has to be clever, and I enjoy seeing Superman employ his brains.  Batman doesn’t get all that much to do, and his head-blow induced personality change (not quite right for the Head-Blow Headcount, sadly!) is an old device.  I’m curious to see where it will take us next issue.  This was enjoyable, and Haney managed to give the mob boss some personality instead of having him just be a stock character, the generic gangster type.  It was definitely a step up from last month!  All things considered, I’ll give this one 3 Minutemen.

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Final Thoughts:

So, how did this set of issues seem to y’all, my fine readers?  Personally, I think this was a pretty strong month.  We had some great stories, like JLA and Aquaman, and we also had a delightful surprise with Manhunter 2070!  That by itself was enough to make this month memorable.  In addition, we had a much more famous debut, with the introduction of Man-Bat.  Even though that comic wasn’t necessarily the greatest, it was exciting to see a classic symbol of the Bronze Age make his first appearance.  Of course, we also had some clunkers, like Teen Titans and GL/GA.  Yet, even missteps like these are beginning to look different.

These aren’t just groaners like the occasional bad Superman comic, overly goofy Silver Age pieces outliving their era.  No, these are issues that are much more the outworkings of a certain climate of ideas, products of their time.  As ham-handed as O’Neil’s writing was in the Green Lantern book, he was trying to wrestle with interesting and challenging themes.  In the same way, the Teen Titans book, despite the stupidity of the driving force of its plot, was a love letter to the space race and the culture’s obsession with the subject.

Though there wasn’t as clear of a common theme as there was last month, there were definitely some interesting trends to be noticed.  We saw hints of the social tensions of the day in the Batgirl backup and even, in a very subtle way, in Aquaman, with the Girl Friday’s shocking willingness to kill purely for the sake of prejudice.  Of course, we mustn’t forget the trendy Batman story featuring the Beatles…errr….I mean the “Twists.”  All told, this was a fun, interesting month, with some good touchstones for the changing culture and the changing genre.  Of course, we’re still seeing inconsistencies across the board, with certain characters evolving in one book but not another.  I’m curious how long such disconnects will continue.

Well, that’s it for June 1970!  I hope you enjoyed this trip with me, Into the Bronze Age!  Please join me next week as we begin our examination of July!

 

The Head-Blow Headcount:

Aquamanhead.jpgBatmanhead.jpgshowcase-88-fnvf-jasons-quest0robin2 - Copy.jpgPhantom_Stranger_05.jpgrobin2 - Copy.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpg

We had Batgirl join the not so illustrious company of the Wall of Shame this month, though Robin is still in the lead.

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