Into the Bronze Age: April 1971 (Part 5)

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Look!  Up in the sky!  It’s a bird!  It’s a plane!  No!  It’s….Into the Bronze Age!  And I’ve got quite a suite of stories for y’all today, mostly starring Superman!  We’ve got everything from emotional epics to spooky specters to menacing monsters, and with Jack Kirby thrown in to make it extra special!  The features below vary in quality, but they were all at least interesting reads, so see what awaits you as we travel further Into the Bronze Age!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #399
  • Adventure Comics #405
  • Aquaman #56 / (Sub-Mariner #72)
  • Detective Comics #410
  • The Flash #205 (Reprints, won’t be covered)
  • Mr Miracle #1
  • The Phantom Stranger #12
  • Superboy #173
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #109
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #137
  • Superman #236
  • Teen Titans #32

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #109


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“I’ll Never Fall in Love Again!”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Werner Roth
Inker: Vince Colletta
Cover Artist: Dick Giordano
Editor: E. Nelson Bridwell

“The Mask of Death!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

Look at this cover.  Dick Giordano gets to ply his pencil and does a fine job (especially on Supes’ stunned expression), though the whole is a bit on the boring side.  The real significance of the design, however, is how it just screams drama.  I was all set for a silly, soap opera-ish story, but what I found was surprising in quality and content.  It’s over the top at moments, but not nearly to the extent I expected.

The tale begins with Lois receiving a note at the Daily Planet that is straight out of The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.  It invites those with painful memories to come to the ‘Denison Clinic,’ where a ‘laser surgery’ will allow them to leave with “a trouble-free mind.”  Having someone cut into your brain with a laser?  What could go wrong!

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Now, I expected for Lois to uncritically to just go right on in and volunteer for this insane-sounding procedure, but Bates impressed me by having the girl reporter just go to investigate this place, hoping for a story.  Once there, the elderly Dr. Denison suddenly traps her inquisitive guest in a chair with a “magnetic force” (is Stan Lee writing this?), and begins to harangue her.

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ll109_05 - CopyApparently this woman was once a professor at Hudson University, where she became a mentor to Lana Lang.  Learning of her love for Superman and her heartbreak when the Man of Steel started chasing Lois, Denison decided that she must do something to protect her young protegee.

Interestingly, she herself has a similar story, as the man she loved became an actor and eventually married a starlet, a woman whom Denison has already “punished.”  Clearly, this lady’s got issues!

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She subjects Lois to a procedure that she claims will give her an “emotional lobotomy,” and destroy her capacity for love.  The girl reporter passes out, only to awaken to see Superman and the police have come to her rescue.  The cops were looking for Denison because she stole her equipment, which, incidentally, has been fitted with a self-destruct device to keep anyone from learning how to undo her handiwork.

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Roth does great work with Lois’s ‘hazy’ vision.

Lois is shaken to realize that she can feel nothing for the Man of Steel, even when he carries her home and is forced to perform some dazzling heroics by destroying rogue meteors (radioactive meteors, of course).  When he brings her back to her apartment, the nervous newshawk snaps, screaming at the Metropolis Marvel to get out and that she doesn’t want “a costumed freak” meddling in her life.  The Action Ace takes this with remarkable patience, leaving graciously and reasoning that she’s just still reeling from her close call.

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The next day, Lois researches Denison’s previous victim and discovers that the actress had been institutionalized!  At work, Clark keeps an eye on her and begins to notice that something is off with his lady love.  Meanwhile, Lana Lang has heard about what has happened and has gone to Dr. Denison in jail to plead with her to reverse her procedure, telling her former teacher that she has moved on.

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That night, Lois and Superman go out on the town, which is a little weird, really, especially when they go to a disco!  Yet, after a passionless kiss ends the night, the Man of Steel realizes decides to check up on the reporter, realizing something is still off.  He spies on her diary entry, which isn’t as creepy as it would normally be in this instance.  Lois confesses to her journal that she is just continuing to date Superman because she enjoys the attention, despite the fact that she feels nothing for him.  In a surprising moment, the Man of Tomorrow smashes the spire of a building in anger over this discovery, though he still has the good manners to fix it immediately afterwards.  It’s a believable moment of weakness, though it’s a pretty huge lapse, when you think about just how powerful he is.  That’s why Superman will later have nightmares about just such a lose of control.

Finally, Lana convinces Dr. Denison to tell them how to restore Lois, but it seems that this can only happen when Lois decides she wants to be able to love once more.  In the following days, Lois stays relentless, cold, and unfeeling, which honestly just might make her a better reporter.  Nonetheless, when she sees a child fall into the path of an oncoming car, she instinctively leaps to her rescue, and with a little unseen assist from Clark, she saves the girl.  The deed triggers, just for a moment, a flicker of emotion, and loveless lovely decides she wants to remember what it feels like to be human.

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Superman flies her out into the country where they meet a minstrel with a magical harp that supposedly can cure her.  Lois is skeptical but listens, and is eventually lulled to sleep.  After she drifts off, the minstrel is revealed to be Roland Kirk, the actor and former lover of the bitter Dr. Denison, who played a part to hypnotize Lois in the guise of a believable fiction.  It turns out that the original procedure was really a form of hypnosis itself, and the cure required a counter-spell of sorts strong enough to break the mental block.  When Lois awakens, she is back to normal, and the two sweethearts are reunited.  Lana, for her part, decides to seek her fortunes elsewhere, heading to a job in Europe.

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This was a curious and unusual little story.  The concept is over the top in standard comic fashion, yet, it works reasonably well.  The emotional core of this tale is surprisingly sincere and effective.  Essentially, what Dr. Denison takes from Lois is not love, per se, or at least, not specifically romantic love, or eros, but what we used to call ‘charity.’  What she robs her of is empathy and the capacity for selfless love that comes with it, the capacity that links us with God.  It is through the ability to love, not acquisitively, but selflessly, ‘charitably,’ that we access the best of human life, the joy that echoes of heaven, and the coldness and emptiness of life without the ability to experience that emotion is really quite a chilling prospect.

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Bates doesn’t realize the full potential of his setup, but neither does he do too bad of a job.  He clearly does understand the significance of charity, and it is to his credit that he doesn’t just limit Lois’s loss to romantic love.  Dr. Denison’s bitter reasoning for targeting Lois is believable (in comic terms), and Lois’s moment of revelation is fairly striking.  Throughout, Werner Roth continues to turn out beautiful art, and his wonderfully detailed faces help to deliver the emotional impact of the story.  Throughout the comic, what could be silly and simplistic is actually treated with some level of thoughtfulness.  The last scene with the random minstrel set up is a bit odd, but I suppose that, in the DC Universe, a dude with a magic instrument is really one of the more believable possibilities for such a situation, especially if you travel in the same kinds of crazy circles as Lois Lane.  So, all told, I think I’ll surprise myself by giving this odd little emotional drama 4 Minutemen.

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“The Mask of Death”


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We continue the ongoing adventures of Rose and Thorn in this backup feature, and today’s adventure is certainly different!  Instead of cops and robbers, this issue plays ghouls and ghosts!  It begins in the normal way, with our favorite vicious vixen trashing some 100 goons.  She jumps a truckfull of hijackers and tears through them, crashing the vehicle.  Once more, Danny Stone is left to pick up the pieces, but this time we are joining the Nymph of Night at the end of her sojourn.

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When she returns to her home base, she discovers a weeping specter in a mask in the secret hallway!  What vision is this?  The figure transforms into a beautiful young woman who says she is the ghost of Selena Mason, an aspiring actress from years ago, and she proceeds to tell her story.

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In some senses, it’s a familiar tale.  A beautiful young woman who would be a star falls in with a controlling man that helps her career, at a cost.  In this case, the controlling fellow is not a director or the like, but a costumer, which is odd.  In fact, he owns the very costume shop that lies adjacent to Rose’s home, forming her base.  Still, he’s every inch the sleeze, and Selena sees him consorting with gangsters, using the Thorn’s secret passage to smuggle them in and out of his shop.

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The tailor, Albert Talbot, thinks he possesses Selena, and when the young starlet falls in love with her co-star, the maddened man throws acid in her face in a classic ‘if I can’t have you, no one will’ move.  It’s a brutal act, and the acid-splashed actress grabs a mask to cover her marred visage, running into the secret passage, where she died from her wounds.  Dark!  The ghost begs the Vixen of Vengeance to live up to her sobriquet so that her restless spirit can find peace, but before the Baleful Beauty can respond, she realizes that the sun is coming up, so she rushes to turn back into Rose and falls asleep.

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This is an interesting change of pace.  There’s no reason why pretty much any character in the DCU couldn’t encounter the supernatural, as ghosts and ghoulies are pretty well established as part of this setting, but it does rather come out of nowhere here.  It is neat to see an explanation for the super convenient abandoned costume shop and secret passage, though.  The spirit’s story is suitably tragic, and it is certainly something that is right up Thorn’s alley, a woman wronged.  Once again, Kanigher manages to split his story effectively, delivering enough to intrigue and entertain, but not so much that it really hurts for space.  I think, in many ways, the compressed backups in Lois Lane are pulling out some of his better work.  On the whole, it’s a good read, so I’ll give it 3.5 Minutemen.  I’m curious to see where it will go next issue.

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P.S.: The letter column for this issue, dealing with the surprising (and surprisingly touching) issue #106, is really noteworthy.  It’s full of praise for that story, including several letters from readers who are themselves part of a minority.  There’s one particularly arresting letter from a 15 year old black boy.  What must it have been like to be a minority comic reader in this era and suddenly see a story filled with black faces and focused on the subject of race amidst a medium that was almost 100% white?  This is pretty cool, and though stories focusing on race seem to be popping out of the woodwork in 1971 (Captain America and the Falcon shared a story arc focused on the theme the same year), the issue is still a special one.  The editor also helpfully informed us that the comic in question was inspired by the movie, Black Like Me, which sounds like a pretty powerful look at race relations in the Civil Rights era South.

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Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #137


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“The Four-Armed Terror!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta

For our second comic of the day, we’ve got more Jack Kirby goodness!  We return to Jimmy Olsen’s antics, and the King continues to deliver on the imaginative and wildly creative work he’s been doing on this book.  In fact, it seems that, with much of his setup work done over the last few issues, there is more time for him to play with what he’s created, and pretty much every facet of the strange Wild Area gets a check-in with this tale.  We begin by discovering what was in the enigmatic egg in the previous issue.  It’s a nicely hideous monster that looks a bit like Etrigan the Demon’s uglier cousin.  Etrigan is still a year away from his debut, but I have to imagine that Kirby liked this design, the yellow skin and the red eyes, and decided to do more with it.  Either way, this strange four-armed creature smashes through the forest of the Wild Area, driven by a mysterious hunger.

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It’s headlong hurry brings it into contact with the remnants of the Outsiders biker gang, who futilely try to fight it.  The monster shrugs off their weapons and wrecks their bikes.  Meanwhile, back in the Mountain of Judgement Jimmy Olsen is seated behind the controls of one of the most Kirby of Kirbytech devices I’ve ever seen.  It turns out to be a fancy instrument that converts “radio-signals from the stars and convert[s] them into mental musical images.”

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It’s the kind of far-out concept that can almost be grasped but stretches the imagination in the attempt, which is pretty cool.  This is an invention of the ‘Hairies,’ who are gathered with the Newsboy Legion for a performance.  The scene is only marred by Flippa-Dippa’s existence and incessant narcissism: “It’s like a movie musical-and everybody’s in it!  Includin’ me, Flippa-Dippa!”  Urg…it’s bad enough to shoe-horn yourself into every conversation, but it’s even worse when you do so in third person!

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What in the world is wrong with Superman’s hand?!

What follows, sadly, is not Flippa-Dippa’s grisly demise, but another beautiful set of Kirby-collages.  I’ve had very mixed feelings about this device in the past, but I have to say, I think it works very well in this instance, successfully capturing something abstract and unimaginable, and in this instance, because the images are not supposed to be phsyically real, the contrast between the character art and background isn’t problematic.  It’s a psychedelic scene, and another example of Kirby’s continued innovation.

 

Anyway, the sonic sojourn is interrupted by a sudden jarring tremor, and the crew learn that the base is under attack from an unknown source!  Superman rushes off to investigate, but he orders the Legion to stay behind, which they don’t take too well.  There’s a fun full-page scene where the Newsboys elect Jimmy their leader and decide to follow the Man of Steel in the hopes of adventure and a good story.  It’s just their heads gathered together in a huddle, and it’s a fun image, full of personality.  Meanwhile, our four-armed friend from the beginning is tearing his way through the earth in search of sustenance.  We discover that he’s after nuclear energy, which he seeks in the main power plant of the Wild Area.  Kirby’s narration is actually rather evocative and helps to crank up the tension.  I would say his writing is getting better, but I seem to recall some rough patches in the future.  We’ll see, I suppose.

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His efforts release a wave of atomic energy that rocks the entire wild world, wrecking the Habitat from a few issues back.  In a curious little touch, Kirby gives us a glimpse of the brutish Yango, one of the bikers, who surprisingly steps up selflessly during the crisis and directs the evacuation.  I wonder if we’ll see him again at some point in time and if we’re supposed to take his change of heart as inspired by our heroes.

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Either way, we quickly move back to Superman as the kids try to follow him in the Whiz Wagon, but the Action Ace has raced the Flash, and the Legion just can’t keep up with him!  The Metropolis Marvel finds the wreckage marking the monster’s passage, and soon confronts the creature.   Yet, even the Man of Tomorrow finds himself challenged by his atomic antagonist’s nuclear strength!  Superman takes a beating, though he manages to throw the beast off of him in time for the Legion to arrive.  Their efforts prove useless, despite a weapon the Hairies gave Jimmy, and the four-armed fiend uses his newly absorbed energy to trap the team in a cocoon of strange energy.

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The immediate threat dealt with, he continues to make his way towards the central atomic pile, while sinister eyes look on.  The guardians of the Evil Factory, Mokkari and Simyan who have unleashed this mutant D.N.Alien on our heroes admire their handiwork.  Their plan is for the monster to destroy the reactor, causing a nuclear explosion that will destroy everything in the area.  The last image of the book is of our two Apokaliptian antagonists looking on as a horde of other monstrous minions hatch from their eggs!

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jimmyolsen137-28Interestingly, we get a map of the whole place, and it doesn’t quite make sense.  We see the layout of everything, but we learn that the Project, Zoomway, Wild Area and the rest are all in a massive cavern under Metropolis…which doesn’t work at all with the first issue where the Legion traveled a long way overland to reach the place.  Kirby was constantly changing things as new ideas struck him, and this certainly seems like an example of that tendency.

This was certainly a fun issue, and the bizarre, imaginative musical journey at its start was a notable feature.  I admire Kirby’s attempt to give the adventure story more purpose than just fighting.  He’s bringing the same sense of exploration, of wide-eyed wonder at what might be, to this book that he brought to the classic Fantastic Four.  That’s important.  Such efforts are not to be discounted because adventure is about more than just punching bad guys; it’s about meeting marvels and seeing things you’ve never seen before.  There is value in wonder for wonder’s sake.  I think that’s something that Kirby understood. 

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That’s a heck of a cliffhanger…

The central conflict of the tale, the monster’s rampage, is suitably gripping, and the stakes are plenty high as an atomic explosion would destroy, not just the Wild Area, but Metropolis as well!  There are also some (perhaps unintentional) interesting thematic elements in the concept of a man-made monster powered by atomic energy threatening to destroy humanity.  There’s some good irony inherent in that setup.  In general, other than Flippa-Dippa’s grating presence, this is a great comic.  Of course Kirby’s art is great, and that three-page musical journey is particularly cool.  It’s a fun read, and the feature creature posses a believable threat to Superman.  That being said, the Man of Steel’s presence in the book really leaves the Legion starved for space.  It’s a shame that the King wasn’t allowed to tell the story he really wanted with them, but he certainly made the best of it!  I’ll give this inventive comic 4.5 Minutemen.

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And with that dramatic conclusion, I also end this post.  It’s really astonishing how much variety DC had back then, with earth-shattering, otherworldly plots in one book and emotion-driven drama (of a sort) in another.  It’s a testament to the versatility of the medium that such disparate stories can be told i it.  Well, I’m racing to get actual work done this summer, but I’m still trying to carve time out for this feature.  Even if it takes me a little while, I hope you will all join me again for another step in our journey into The Bronze Age!  Until then, keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

One comment on “Into the Bronze Age: April 1971 (Part 5)

  1. […] another Kanigher-penned tale, the continuation of his Rose and Thorn feature.  This one picks up where the last left off, with the titular Thorn haunted by the spirit of a wronged woman that wants vengeance in order to […]

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