Into the Bronze Age: November 1971 (Part 3)

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Welcome back to the second Bronze Age blog post of the new year!  I hope that 2019 is treating all of you well, my dear readers.  So far it seems to be a bit kinder than 2018 for the Greys, but it’s far too early to tell.  As for the reason we’re here, this post has a Flash comic and another iteration of the growing Fourth World saga for our superheroic scrutiny.  We’re on the way to seeing what November, 1971 had for us, and in this pair of comics, there are some weird ideas.  Ready for some Bronze Age bonkers books?  Then let’s see what we’ve got, shall we?

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #406
  • Adventure Comics #412
  • Batman #236
  • Brave and the Bold #98
  • Detective Comics #417
  • The Flash #210
  • Forever People #5
  • G.I. Combat #150
  • Justice League of America #94
  • New Gods #5
  • Superboy #179
  • Superman #244
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #116
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #143
  • World’s Finest #207

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


The Flash #210


the_flash_vol_1_210

“An Earth Divided!”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Dick Giordano
Cover Artist: Murphy Anderson

“A Tasteless Trick!”
Writer: Steve Skeates
Penciler: Dick Giordano
Inker: Dick Giordano

“The Invasion of the Cloud Creatures!”
Writer: John Broome
Penciler: Carmine Infantino
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Letterer: Gaspar Saladino
Editor: Julius Schwartz

Well, back to the unnecessarily complicated future adventures of the Flash….yay?  I think these future-jaunts are my least favorite part of the Silver/Bronze Age Flash setting, mostly because of the bonkers way it ties in with Iris.  On the plus side, check out the sneaky Adam Strange cameo on our cover!  As for that cover, it’s an odd choice to have our hero be watching the inciting incident on a TV (albeit a weird, robot TV, though at least it isn’t Mike!), and that choice pushes their shock-value concept into a tithe of the image real-estate, giving it proportionately less power.  It’s not a very exciting or interesting cover, and I can’t say that it made me excited to read the book, however wacky and unusual the premise.

flash v1 210 0003

Speaking of, Bates loses no time in jumping into his crazy concept with both feet, and we join Abe Lincoln in his study, taking notes on a taperecorder.  Now, don’t let the presence of the tape throw you; this is actually supposed to be a futuristic scene!  As “Lincoln” waxes on with a combination of exposition and paraphrases of historical speeches, John Wilkes Booth shows up and reenacts history by shooting him with a ray gun, shouting “Sic semper tyrannis!” (Thus always to tyrants).  History buffs will note that those are the words said by the real Booth when he shot the real Lincoln.  Confused yet?

flash v1 210 0004 - copy

“Thus always to robot overlords!”

Well, it’s all about to become as plain as it ever will be in a goofy story like this, as we join Barry and Iris as they prepare for a trip to the future to visit her real parents, because someone thought that whole retcon was a good idea.  There is a cute exchange, where Iris keeps her hurried hubby waiting in a small bit of revenge for all the times the Fastest Man Alive has been the slowest date on record.  When they arrive, her parents explain our ridiculous premise, that the future nation of Earth West created an android duplicate of Lincoln to guide them through the difficult period of tension with Earth East and try to reunite the planet.

flash v1 210 0004

That’s an…interesting choice.  Yeah, he presided over the nation through the Civil War and successfully reunited the country…but he did that by force, and it was probably the greatest national tragedy in our history.  If you’re trying to prevent a war, maybe pick someone who didn’t ended up in exactly the type of situation you’re trying to avoid?  The shaky logic of that idea aside, in response to its implementation, the tyrant of Earth East created his own android, modeled on John Wilkes Booth, designed to kill the robot Lincoln….because that was the only rational solution, obviously.

flash v1 210 0012

Booth-bot tries to escape Earth West by traveling through the “Wild Region,” which is a section of the planet blasted by nuclear war and afflicted by weird radiation that can have strange effects.  Flash, who of course sets out to pursue the android assassin, follows him into the wasteland and manages to avoid the…radioactivity…by running…fast?  It’s odd, but the Wild Region manifests its danger as grasping spectral claws…because comic book radiation is magic!  Unfortunately, once through, the Scarlet Speedster is captured by a high-tech chain trap that grows ever tighter and is so dense he cannot vibrate through it.

flash v1 210 0008flash v1 210 0011

When Booth-bot reports to the tyrant, Bekor, his master zaps him with his own gun, but unexpectedly, the Lincoln bot reforms, having outguessed his nemesis and used a device that effectively stored his atoms and reassembled them when the gun was fired again.  Explanations finished, mecha-Lincoln decides to deliver an old fashioned, 19th Century back-woods whuppin’, and jumps Bekor.  Now, however odd a choice Lincoln may have been to bring peace to a world-divided, he was, by all accounts, quite the bare-knuckle boxer and butt-kicker in his day.

 

 

Meanwhile, the Fastest Man Alive was in danger of becoming the fastest ghost in the graveyard, with all efforts to free himself failing.  Finally, he hit upon a winning idea, and began to spin, until the terrific centrifugal force of his whirling unwrapped the chain.  The free Flash arrives just in time to rescue the Abedroid and capture Bekor, bringing both back to Earth West.

flash v1 210 0018

This is a weird tale, with the type of unlikely premise that could only come from comics…or perhaps Star Trek.  I guess Bates must have been a Lincoln buff, especially given how the android Abe is actually the hero of this story, with the Flash relegated to little more than a fancy taxi service in the end.  The whole thing is pretty silly, but it isn’t a bad read, despite that.  Honestly, the craziness just feels of a piece with the Flash’s already ridiculous future setting.  There’s a subplot about Iris setting up a news service for the future folks, but it never really goes anywhere, which is a shame, because that could have been fun.  In the end, I’ll give this goofy gaff of a story 2.5 Minutemen, though I suppose I should watch my backs for Booth-bots!

minute2.5


“A Tasteless Trick”


flash v1 210 0021

The real star of this comic is, once again, the Elongated Man backup, which is delightful.  It begins the way most Elongated Man stories I’ve read tend to, with his mystery-loving nose starting to twitch.  What starts it moving is an unusual occurrence in the form of a man buying a magazine from a stand, then biting a big chunk out of it.  Ralph smells a mystery and immediately strips out of his street clothes, loading poor Sue down with them, and setting out to trail the magazine masticator and his companions, by stretching to the rooftops!

flash v1 210 0023

He follows them to a theater and, discovering that his target is a magician, concludes that it must just have been a trick.  Returning home, Ralph can’t get any rest, as his nose keeps on twitching.  When he reexamines the magazine, he realizes that it contains a story about a millionaire’s mansion, including a floor-plan.  Concluding, in a fairly gigantic leap of logic, that the magician was trying to tip him off about a robbery at that estate, the Ductile Detective ducks out the door and races for the Savin Mansion.  When he arrives, he discovers the prestidigitator being forced at gunpoint to find a hidden safe and overhears that the thieves are holding his daughter to ensure his cooperation.

flash v1 210 0024

In a fun bit, the Stretchable Sleuth disarms the leader and takes out his gang, but the leader recovers his gun and threatens their other hostage, Mr. Savin.  In another clever bit, Ralph stretches his foot all the way around the room and kicks the gunman from behind.  Unfortunately, in the melee, the magician is knocked out, and we discover that the gang was going to kill his daughter if they didn’t return very shortly.

 

 

The Ductile Detective searches for clues, but then makes another giant leap of logic, and deduces that the gang-leader’s reference to “the Pad” was about a specific place rather than slang, since he didn’t use slang in the rest of his speech.  Racing to the nightclub, “The Pad,” Ralph arrives just in time to save the magician’s daughter.  After this dramatic rescue, the Magician explains his clue and Ralph explains his deduction, but neither really makes sense.

flash v1 210 0030

Nonetheless, despite the pretty huge logical jumps where the story progresses at the speed of plot, this is a really fun little lark of a tale.  Ralph’s adventures are just a blast, and even in the small amount of ‘screen time’ that he and Sue get, there are some fun interactions.  The Elongated Man is just a great, entertaining character, and he is quickly becoming a favorite of mine and making these Flash comics more enjoyable by his presence.  Skeates and Giordano are producing some really good backups for him.  I hope they’ll be continuing on this strip for a good while.  Giordano’s art is especially good, with Ralph always stretching or moving in fun and creative ways, and constantly solving his problems with interesting applications of his powers, as well as his agile mind.  I’ll give this delightful little backup 3.5 Minutemen, because it is so much fun that you forget about the weak writing as you get swept up in the story.

minute3.5


The Forever People #5


forever_people_v.1_5

“Sonny Sumo”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Jack Kirby

“Crime Carnival!”
Writer: Joe Simon
Pencilers: Joe Simon and Jack Kirby
Inkers: Joe Simon and Jack Kirby
Letterer: Howard Ferguson
Editor: Whitney Ellsworth

“The Young Gods of Supertown”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Jack Kirby

We return to perhaps the least popular (it’s something of a contest with Jimmy Olsen) of the King’s Fourth World books, with another issue of Forever People.  Last issue proved surprisingly interesting, but this one doesn’t quite live up to that level.  We’ve got a solid, if unexceptional, cover, with the dramatic reveal of a new character, Sonny Sumo…who is something of a mixed bag, but more about him later.  The actual image features the whole team and a nicely threatening array of guns, but there really isn’t that much to say about it.  Sonny himself does not make for that interesting of a central figure, being just a guy with a headband and trunks.  His orange coloring is also a bit odd, making him seem more like an alien than an Asian, which is its own brand of problematic.

forever people 005 - 02 & 03 (large)

Inside, we meet Sonny in earnest, amidst some of Kirby’s more purple prose, as the young man prepares to fight a gigantic robot….as an entertainment act!  I feel like there’s got to be easier ways to make a living.  There is a great two-page splash setting up the conflict, and it is pure Kirby.  The young fighter puts on an impressive showing against Saguta, the robot, but is badly burned during the brawl.  Interestingly, he focuses intently and heals his wounds, then turns the table on his artificial antagonist.

forever people 005 - 08

Back in the locker room after the fight, we see that his healing was only temporary, and his wounds begin to overwhelm him, until Mother Box, which teleported to him last issue, forms a connection with him and heals him.  Suddenly, Sonny finds that he can understand the device, which requests his aid, and, as it is “a mission worthy of a samurai”, he agrees.

 

 

He finds himself transported to the carnival of carnage, Happyland, where Desaad is holding the Forever People, and one by one, the wrestling warrior frees the youths from their perilous prisons.  The feedback destroys the master torturer’s “Psycho-Fuge”, through which the monstrous malefactor feed upon his victims’ fears.

 

 

forever people 005 - 16

This is a lovely sequence, nice twist on ‘Sleeping Beauty.’

In response, he sends his troops after the team.  When cornered, Sonny is able to connect with the Mother Box in order to overcome the guards’ minds and put them to sleep, a feat which impresses his newfound companions, who realize that he unknowingly possesses the dreaded Anti-Life Equation!  The adventure ends with Darkseid, still not looking like himself, having overheard the Forever People’s startling statement, and he gives the order to kill them all and capture Sonny Sumo!

forever people 005 - 19

So, this isn’t a bad issue, really, but it does have its problems.  It’s got some fun elements, and Kirby gives us some nice, dramatic moments.  Once again, the Forever People don’t really have much to do, as Sonny takes center-stage.  You can’t help but wonder what the team is actually good for at this point.  Sonny himself is an interesting new character, and he certainly has a memorable introduction.

forever people 005 - 20

He represents an admirable attempt by Kirby to bring a bit more diversity to his books and his new world, but that presents its own problems.  Sonny’s size and depiction make him seem less like a human with Asian ancestry and more like another strange Kirby-creature.  His exaggerated coloring at times doesn’t help that impression.  The fact that he’s running around in just trunks, like the Thing, while everyone else has elaborate costumes, makes him stick out further.  I just found him a little odd and off-putting, visually, because of the excesses of his portrayal.  Still, we’re a long way from the ‘yellow peril‘ portrayals of Japanese people in comics, so it’s a net win, I suppose.

The promising and intriguing set-up from last issue, which dealt with perception and reality, doesn’t really amount to much in this one, which is a shame.  I’m guessing that the King was moving so quickly, spinning out so many different concepts and ideas, that he either abandoned the themes he had been working on in favor of a new idea or just plain forgot about them.  In the end, this is a fine comic, but it doesn’t really take advantage of an interesting setup, nor do anything particularly fascinating.  The art is solid, with a few standout panels and pages and no real noticeable missteps.  I’ll give this tale 3 Minutemen, as it is a fairly average offering.  I will be curious to see what Kirby has in store for Sonny.

minute3


“The Young Gods of Supertown: Lonar”


forever people 005 - 36 - the young gods of supertown

We get the start of a new backup strip this issue, and it is an interesting one.  In my first read-through, I remember being very intrigued by these teasing glimpses of the wider world of the New Gods.  I was really struck by the untapped potential in these brief peeks into the unexplored corners of the Fourth World and the fascinating characters and concepts that remained hidden in them.  You can’t help asking what might have been, if Kirby had been able to continue?

forever people 005 - 38

This particular tale focuses on Lonar, soon to be known as The Wanderer, who forsakes the safety and comfort of the floating Supertown and explores the wild places of New Genesis, sifting the ruins of the Old Gods’ cataclysmic final conflict.  In the remains of a shattered city, the explorer’s Mother Box detects something still alive, and with its help, he excavates a mound of solidified ash.  Inside, he discovers a lone survivor of the world that was, a mighty warhorse of the old gods.  As the ruins collapse around him, destabilized by his discovery, he leaps astride the horse, and together they escape.

forever people 005 - 39

That’s it, four frantic, all-too-brief pages, and the hints of who knows what hidden wonders.  Once again, we see a fascinating instance of “the illusion of depth.”  I’ve always liked Lonar, and I truly wish Kirby had been able to explore his wanderings.  What might he have had in store for us in the strange, unexplored wilderness of New Genesis?  I’ll give this teasing glimpse of a wider world 3 Minutemen, as it is too brief to accomplish much more than to whet our imaginative appetites.

minute3


And with that double dose of Kirby, I’ll close out this post.  I am enjoying my second visit to the Fourth World, but I am particularly looking forward to more New Gods, which was always the best of the books, to my mind, the real core of the series.  If I remember correctly, the next issue of that book features the criminally underused aquatic antagonists, the Deep Six, in what I recall being a great yarn.  As for the Flash, I am getting quite tired of this era of the book.  Looking ahead, I see a much more promising run, with some actual villains, not too far in our future.  Here’s hoping that will represent an improvement.  Until then, I hope you will continue to join me as we delve deeper Into the Bronze Age!  Keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

4 comments on “Into the Bronze Age: November 1971 (Part 3)

  1. M.P. says:

    Shoot the robot bear, eh? Who among us hasn’t wanted to do that. I see a Westworld-type theme park in the future.
    The comics here are all new to me (which is generally the case) and I particularly enjoy seeing Fourth World stuff I missed. I think I saw that Sonny Sumo in one of those Ultimate Crises on Somesuch Earth deals, and I wondered what was up with that guy.
    Enjoyable post as always. Good to see The Greylands still barreling along down the highway.

    • Benton Grey says:

      Ha, yes! Funland was ahead of its time!

      As far as I know, I have never seen Sonny outside of these books, so I’ll be curious if he has anything done with him in the relatively immediate future.

      Thanks M.P.! You might say we’re getting back on the Zoomway! Hopefully we won’t run into any Mountains of Judgement!

  2. B Smith says:

    Where Steve Skeates (writer of the Elongated Man Story) goes, can Mr Savin be far behind? The name rang a bell, and I looked up a few other places where I’d seen it.

    A quick check via Google will show that the name “Warren Savin’ has popped up in many of Skeates’s scripts, from a mad scientist in a “Plop!” story, to at reporter in a “What If?” issue. He’s used it as a pseudonym for writing a Question script, or claimed a Reverend Warren Savin put him on the straight and narrow in his childhood (in a text piece in “Creepy”).

    Where he got the name from is anyone’s guess – name dropping a friend, or just having his own private laff? At any rate, it shouldn’t have been a surprise to see it in print once more.

    • Benton Grey says:

      Hey, interesting! I hadn’t noticed the pattern, but that’s fascinating. Great catch, man! I wonder what this Savin sequence is all about. I did a little research and couldn’t turn anything up. Curious! Well, the Question story seems to have come at the beginning of his career, so maybe it was just a private joke that he recycled the name in years and stories to come.

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