Into the Bronze Age: December 1971 (Part 5)

Hello fellow Internet wanderers, and welcome to another edition of Into the Bronze Age, finishing up our coverage of December 1971. I’m afraid that there is a cloud hanging over our celebration of the joy of classic comics today, as a tragedy has struck the FF community. We recently learned of the death of Cyber Burn, content creator extraordinaire, my constant aide and ally, my dear friend, and all-around great human being. He was an amazing guy, and we are all grieving his loss. I’m going to write more about him and his importance to our community and literally everything I ever created for FF in a future post. At the moment, I don’t have the capacity to do him justice, though I am far from certain that I ever will be up to that particular herculean task.

In the meantime, let’s celebrate one of the things that always brought him joy, one of the things that, for him, as for many of us, served as a refuge from the ugliness and tawdriness of the world around us, the realm of the fantastic, the brighter, more hopeful terrain, of superhero comics. Let’s see what our last books of the month have in store for us.

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #407
  • Adventure Comics #413
  • Batman #237
  • Detective Comics #418
  • The Flash #211
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #87
  • Justice League of America #95
  • Mr. Miracle #5
  • Phantom Strange #16
  • Superboy #180
  • Superman #246 (#245 was all reprints)
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #117
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #144
  • Teen Titans #36
  • World’s Finest #208

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #144


“A Big Thing in a Deep Scottish Lake!”
Writer/Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inkers: Vince Colletta and Murphy Anderson
Letterer: John Costanza
Editors: Jack Kirby and E. Nelson Bridwell


DNA Project: “The Torn Photograph”
Writer/Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer John Costanza
Editors: Jack Kirby and E. Nelson Bridwell


Newsboy Legion: “Kings for a Day!”
Writers: Joe Simon and Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Joe Simon
Letterer: Howard Ferguson
Editors: Whitney Ellsworth

The first book in this batch is that misfit, redheaded step-child of the Fourth World titles, Jimmy Olsen, but unlike the bizarre, confusing mixture of ideas from the previous pair of issues, this month the King gives us something much more focused and fun. As you might guess from the cover, this comic sees the Newsboy Legion and our titular cub reporter coming face to snout with an ersatz Loch Ness Monster. In such an aquatic adventure there’s even a chance that Flippa Dippa might actually be useful….but I wouldn’t count on it. The cover image itself is a pretty good one, with a nicely dynamic and exciting central drama unfolding upon it, as the Legion hang on for dear life or leap to safety during their impromptu shipwreck. The whole thing has the King’s trademark energy and excitement. Superman doesn’t quite fit in with the picture, both because of Murphy Anderson’s overwriting of Kirby’s work and because he’s not really part of the dominant scene. That is actually rather accurate, as he plays no role in Jimmy’s plot, but it looks a bit odd to have him disproportionately soaring past as his young friends face pseudo-Nessie’s watery wrath, ‘Sorry kids, I’ve got super-business back in Metropolis, good luck with the monster!’

Not exactly the most creative of titles…

Kirby’s cover is a pretty fair promise of what awaits us within, and our tale begins with a Kirby-tech speedboat racing across the surface of “Loch Trevor,” which is totally not Loch Ness, thankyouverymuch. The pilot of the craft is searching for a supposed sea monster that stalks the waters of the Loch, and he finds it, or rather, it finds him, in rather dramatic fashion, destroying his ship and setting the stage for our adventure. Back in Metropolis, everyone’s favorite corporate shark, Morgan Edge, is raking Jimmy Olsen and the Newsboy Legion over the coals for failing to come back with a story. Of course, they have a heck of a story about “The Project,” but they’ve been sworn to secrecy. The King also seems to have forgotten that he last left Jimmy Olsen watching musicals projected onto the clouds of a miniature Universal Monster-themed world, so one would imagine he’s got quite the story to tell himself! Nonetheless, the heinous head of Galaxy Broadcasting casually dismisses the Legion’s claim that their Whiz Wagon was destroyed by a bomb and sends them out to chase down the scoop on the sea monster of Loch Trevor. Man, the gang are awfully forgiving about all of Edge’s attempts to kill them. You think they’d be a tad more insistent about that whole thing. Yet, once they’re out of his office, he opens the secret screen in his desk that we saw in this month’s Lois Lane, but this time he’s not looking at himself. Instead, he orders a hit on the Newsboy Legion!

Meanwhile, all crime everywhere has apparently been stopped, because Superman and the Guardian are spending their time dropping by a “discotheque,” not for charity, not as a benefit, not working a case, but just to “help their attendance.” Oookay? I’m glad they’ve got their priorities straight. Inside, they meet the young woman who is running the place, a girl named Terry Dean, who we saw briefly in #138. It seems she first appeared in a rather interesting sounding issue, #127, wherein Jimmy Olsen goes undercover to expose a slumlord. It’s neat and a little surprising that Kirby is making use of this minor supporting character introduced before his run, though I wouldn’t have minded some editorial reminders here. At any rate, Dean introduces them to a super Kirby-ified band, the San Diego Five String Mob, who are secretly serving Apokolips. They are wonderfully cool looking, in that inimical Kirby style of gonzo gadgets and weird wardrobes. As the malevolent musicians maintain their cover, playing strange music, Dubbilex, the D.N.Alien suddenly appears, bringing with him a warning!

The King cuts away before we see what comes of that, though, and we travel to the skies over Scotland, where Jimmy and the Legion are literally dumped out of a fancy jet in the Whiz Wagon. Scrapper is determined he’s going to fit in, and has dressed the part, complete with kilt and Tam o’ Shanter, but unfortunately, his voice gives him away every time he opens his mouth, which becomes a running gag. On the ground, the gang nearly run over their contact, Felix MacFinney, as they try to stop their careening car, but they manage to do no permanent harm. This whole scene is fun and Kirby actually gives us some fairly charming humor, though we’re also besieged with comically exaggerated Scottish accents at every turn.

Back in the “discotheque,” Dubbilex reveals to the Man of Steel that there is a tunnel under the club that leads right back to the Project, but it is a tunnel the good guys didn’t make! Well, the bad band certainly can recognize a cue, so they prepare to strike…giving us a weird and interesting little sequence. They each play a note, summoning their “Sixth String,” Barri-boy, who is just another guy with a crazy instrument, but he literally brings the house down when he plays! That seems a little inefficient, but it’s still a fun sequence.

Back in Scotland, our neophyte newshawks meet MacFinney’s lovely daughter and engage in some banter while the plan for the monster-hunt the next day. MacFinney also shows them a device he created to attract the marine menace. Nothing suspicious here, nope! The next morning finds them out on the Loch, monitoring Flippa Dippa as he swims in its murky depths. Suddenly, he’s ambushed below the waves by a fellow frogman, and the others prepare to go to his aid, only to find themselves looking down the barrel of MacFinney’s gun! It seems that the Scotsman is actually an Intergang assassin! Fortunately, while Jimmy distracts the gunsel, the little Scrapper Trooper that the full-sized Scrapper brought along slips away and activates the monster lure. The situation is resolved in dramatic fashion, as the creature swamps the boat and seizes MacFinney, leaving the others soaked but safe. When they reach the shore, they find Flippa Dippa there ahead of them, having overcome his assailant, MacFinney’s “daughter,” another Intergang assassin. One wonders, how inept must she be at her job to have been taken out by Flippa Dippa? Confused but very curious, the gang determine to stay in Scotland and solve this monstrous mystery!

This is a fairly fun story, as silly as it is in parts, and the main plot, with Jimmy and the Newsboy Legion investigating the mystery and generally carrying on with their own banter and shenanigans, seems like a good fit for the characters. It’s a premise that serves them well, and I’d be happy to see the book settle onto a course like this. Heaven knows the last few issues have shown it is desperately in need of some direction. In terms of the writing, Kirby’s dialog, rather stilted and awkward in some of his other books, is generally in much better shape in this issue, provided you don’t mind his atrocious Scottish accents. He seems to have a good grasp of the voices of the Newsboys, which isn’t too surprising, seeing as they are his creations, after all. In fact, the interplay between Scrapper and the Scotsman, as well as the banter between the rest of the boys, is often genuinely funny and enjoyable. And then there’s everything Flippa Dippa says…the book’s resident embarrassment has fairly cringe-inducing lines throughout, like: “This ghetto guppie says ‘yeah!'” and “My SCUBA cells are vibratin’, Jimmy.” It is rather funny in an almost meta sense how desperately enthusiastic he is when he discovers that their adventure will involve a body of water, like he realizes how completely pointless he is as a character. Overall, Flippa Dippa aside, this is an enjoyable adventure. The King’s unmatched creativity is once again on display, but all of these different elements fit together much better than the bizarre horror-planet of the previous issues. Superman and the Guardian just sort of casually dropping by the club is pretty goofy, but the Kirby-tech band is so cool that I’m willing to give it a pass. Of course, the King’s art is great throughout, despite Colletta’s inking. I’ll give this promising start to a new adventure 4 Minutemen, with its sillier elements holding it back from a higher score.

P.S.: I’ve been really enjoying the Newsboy Legion stories that have been reprinted as backups in these books. They’re simple but fun.


Teen Titans #36


“The Tomb be Their Destiny”
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Murray Boltinoff


Aqualad: “The Girl of the Shadows”
Writer: Steve Skeates
Penciler/Inker: Jim Aparo
Letterer: Jim Aparo


“Superboy Meets Robin the Boy Wonder”
Writer: Bill Finger
Penciler: Al Plastino
Inker: Al Plastino
Editor: Jack Schiff


“The Teenager from Nowhere”
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler/Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda
Editor: Mort Weisinger

Well, if this month’s Jimmy Olsen issue was an improvement over the previous one, we can’t really say the same for this month’s Teen Titans, which is rather disappointing. The book continues to limp along without a clear direction and without any real reason for the Titans to actually be involved in its plots. To start with, we’ve got an okay cover, with a hint of mystery to it, though the perspective and layout is a bit wonky. I’m not really sure how those stairs exist in relation to the angle of the floor at the front. While the scene is non-Euclidean, it is also atmospheric, but the context is a bit too vague for it to be entirely successful. Our heroes seem to be hunting this figure rather than trying to rescue him, but he’s turning to dust, which his dialog tells us is….bad, as if they’re out to help him? It’s just not terribly successful.

Unfortunately, the story itself isn’t much better. It picks up where we left off in our last issue, in the purported crypt of the “real” Romeo and Juliet, where Robin, Speedy, Wonder Girl, and the superfluous Mr. Jupiter examine the scene and debate whether Lilith is really the incarnation of Romeo’s star-crossed lady love. They spot a shadowy figure and give chase, only to be temporarily trapped by a cave-in. While they are delayed, the shadowy figure sneaks off with the unconscious forms of Romeo and Lilith (doesn’t have quite the same ring as the original, does it?).

The misshapen figure turns out to be a hunchbacked madman named “Calibano,” who is supposed to resemble Romeo’s cousin of the same name, though I wouldn’t have gotten that from the art alone. As the young lovers revive, this Calibano tells them that Romeo and Juliet were actually part of a love triangle, with him as the third angle. Lilith uses her power of vagueness to learn that it was actually him who killed the original moon-struck Montague, causing Juliet to take her own life. Then, he apparently got trapped in their tomb and put into suspended animation…by…plot? Seriously, that’s not explained at all.

Now Calibano’s convinced that the new couple are the originals reawakened, as he was, and he challenges Romeo 2.0 to a duel, and the brave young man fights a desperate battle while Lilith makes the valuable contribution of…shouting…and…looking worried. It’s just a very impressive showing for a superheroine. As the ancient feud reunites, the rest of the Titans follow the trail of their lost teammate, only to come across the other Calibano leading a water-borne funeral procession. We’re reminded that the police were interested in the Loggia family, and this funereal flotilla out on a foggy night seems suspicious.

Suddenly, Mr. Juptier, who let’s remember has displayed no particular skills or abilities or received any special training up to this point, decides that he’s an action hero, and he and Robin investigate the suspect ships. The pair discover that the casket is a cover for smuggling industrial diamonds (which really doesn’t seem all that worthwhile, really), and overcome a bunch of frogmen in an extended scene where neither of them is apparently troubled by the need to, you know, breath for what one can only assume is a good 15-20 minutes. The marine marvel millionaire hauls himself out of the water to confront Calibano, and is nearly killed, only to have his life saved by the sudden arrival of Don Loggia, who is actually honest, though still a jerk, and who was suspicious of his nephew.

While Robin was being upstaged by a random dude with no qualifications for hero work, the other two Titans arrive just in time to save Romeo…by straight-up murdering the original Calibano! That’s right, Speedy shoots the guy with a sharp arrow as opposed to any of the zillion trick arrows he carries. He shoots him right in the chest, and though the poor fellow is able to stagger back to the crypt, he definitely dies. (Man, the books this month have had an unusually high body count for the era!) The story ends with the characters wondering if Lilith and Romeo are actually the reincarnations of their much more interesting and famous predecessors, and we are told that they are totally in love. Yep, definitely deeply and really in love, a love that is absolutely going to last beyond this issue and will certainly carry significance for years to come. Or not. Yeah, it will probably not surprise y’all to learn that our dear friend, Zany Haney, the anti-continuity cop, completely drops that particular plot thread, and this Romeo guy is never heard from again. It’s just as well, because the whole ‘reincarnated Romeo and Juliet’ angle doesn’t seem super sustainable over the long-haul.

So, what are we to make of this story? Well, much like the previous issue, it’s not an entirely bad tale, by itself, but it isn’t particularly suitable for the Teen Titans, and there is absolutely no reason for these characters to be here. The actual Titans contribute almost nothing to the story, short of Speedy murdering a poor, deformed, and mentally ill fellow. That’s the part of the story that galls me most, as Haney gives Speedy exactly one panel to feel a little bad about missing the sword and shooting the guy straight in the chest, and that is it, as if this wasn’t entirely avoidable if the character was acting in any normal fashion. And, of course, because it’s a Zany Haney plot, this killing will never be mentioned or thought-of again, and that’s terrible on multiple levels.

Let’s also not forget Haney just casually adding a character and a whole subplot to what is arguably the most famous play of all time. It’s not quite as bonkers as it seems, though, as it is very likely that “Calibano” and his plotline were drawn from “Caliban,” a character in another of Shakespeare’s plays, The Tempest. In that story of magic and mysticism, Caliban was the misshapen and monstrous servant of the wizard Prospero and was also the unlucky angle of a love triangle. Nonetheless, even if Calibano has respectable origins in another of the Bard’s tales, his presence in this story is weird and a bit disconcerting, especially because the last issue ended with the young couple discovering the apparently mummified remains of Calibano, who was also wearing different clothes. Continuity errors aside, this whole thing is just a bit of a mess. Everything happens at the speed of plot, and the two plotlines end up feeling entirely alien to each other, despite the attempts to connect them with the multiple Calibanos. You could pretty much drop the entire Loggia family plot thread from this issue and lose nothing except for Mr. Jupiter’s inexplicable display of commando skills.

As you might be able to tell, I have just about lost all patience with this whole premise. This whole ‘superhero summer camp’ thing we’ve got going on, with the Titans involved in this vague project with Jupiter, just has nothing to recommend it to me. Lilith also continues to be vague and pointless, only now she is joined in her uselessness by Wonder Girl, who does nothing all issue. I find myself wishing we could see the Titans be, you know, superheroes. On the plus side, the team of Tuska and Cardy continues to be great, really turning out some lovely work with lots of darkly atmospheric scenes that add some drama and mystery to this silly plot. Their work is really deserving of a better story. So, what is the final score? Well, I would probably have given this one 2.5 Minutemen like its first half if it weren’t for Haney having Speedy kill the antagonist with zero justification, logic, or examination. That plus ‘secret agent-Jupiter’ sours the story for me, so I’ll give it 1 Minuteman. Haney is really batting 1000 this month.


“The Girl of the Shadows”


Interestingly, this issue has another little Aqualad backup, which is cool, but it is a super brief one, only running 3 pages. Apparently, this little mini-adventure, by the wonderful SAG team, was actually slated to appear in the cancelled Aquaman #57, and it was put into inventory when that book never materialized. Unfortunately, that also meant that this intriguing little tale and the mysteries that it introduces are never resolved! What a crying shame! Being only 3 pages, there’s really not enough here to judge, so I’ll just share all three pages and offer a brief overview.

It begins with the young Aquatic Ace emerging onto darkened docks, searching for a girl that had intrigued him when he saw her earlier at a concert (don’t tell Tula!). Just as he finds her and she gives him a cryptic greeting, she is confronted by a big man in strange armor who tries to capture the mysterious maiden. The Sea Prince cleans his clock, then asks the girl for an explanation. All she says is that they must “get past the wall — before it’s too late!”, and then she disappears, leaving our young hero to wonder what this strange encounter was all about. So, we are left with a mystery that will likely never be solved, and that’s a shame, because Skeates set the stage for an interesting story, and I would have quite enjoyed it if he had been given a chance to finish it in these pages.


“The Teen-Ager from Nowhere”


That…is a very…generous description of the infamous mythical figure, Lilith.

This month’s Titans issue actually held two original backups, and the second is a solo Lilith story, which is actually a good deal better than you’d probably expect from what we’ve seen of her in the main book. This little tale is something of an origin story, and in just 7 pages Haney gives us more information about Lilith and more reason to care about her than in all of the issues she’s been in up to this point combined. It is still, of course, pretty vague, but that vagueness is at least a bit more understandable here, and the story also seems to promise some answers might be forthcoming.

It begins when a 12 year old Lilith sees a group of men leaving her small Kentucky town to search for the body of a young boy presumed drowned in the river. Suddenly she runs after them and yells that he’s not in the river, leading them into the hills and finally to an old well. They find and rescue the boy, but then they begin to wonder how she knew he was there. The young girl can’t explain her knowledge, and the crowd grows more suspicious until her father finally arrives and takes her home. Back in the safety of her own house, her parents are supportive, but the pre-teen psychic senses that she is actually adopted, and she runs out of the house in search of her origins.

In fact, she runs all the way to the orphanage that once sheltered her, where somehow the matron recognizes and remembers her, despite the fact that she was only one year old when she was adopted. Neat trick! Lilith learns that her powers were apparently shared by her real mother, who brought her to the orphanage after some mysterious trouble relating to her father. The kindly matron warns the strange girl not to dredge up the tragedies of the past, but the youth swears that she will discover who she is, though she is glad when her adoptive parents come to fetch her home.

This is a surprisingly good story for focusing on Lilith, and it shows that she could be a decent character if she was given any development or personality other than “mysteriousness.” The girl’s lack of understanding of her powers or past is much more believable and excusable, as she is just beginning her journey. A 12-year-old not being able to explain a first flash of psychic insight is much more understandable and palatable than, say, a college-age girl doing the same after having lived with such abilities for years. Nick Cardy’s art is just plain gorgeous, as always, and he brings so much humanity and emotion to his characters that you can’t help but sympathize with the lost young girl or her concerned parents. Haney’s writing is positively restrained and thoughtful here, and the final result is a really solid and intriguing backup that actually makes me, of all things, look forward to more stories about Lilith! I’ll give it 4 Minutemen, as it isn’t quite strong enough to reach a higher score, .


World’s Finest #208


Cover Artists: Neal Adams and Gaspar Saladino

“Peril of the Planet-Smashers!”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella
Letterer: John Costanza
Editors: Julius Schwartz and E. Nelson Bridwell


“The Inside Story of Robotman!”
Writer: Joseph Samachson
Penciler/Inker: Jimmy Thompson
Editor: Jack Schiff


Ghost Patrol: “The ‘Spectacular’ Crimes”
Writer: John Broome
Penciler: Carmine Infantino
Inker: Frank Giacoia
Editor: Sheldon Mayer

Oh man, what an awesome cover! How could you pass by the newsstand and not plunk down your quarter to see what kind of story could have such an epic image over its pages? Many of us have probably heard the old saying that the Silver Age Superman could “juggle planets,” but that expression, which captures the casual omnipotence of the character and thus one of the flaws with his portrayal in the era, doesn’t really apply here. Instead, we get a wonderful portrayal of a truly epic feat that feels properly epic. You can see the strain and effort on Superman’s face, like a moment out of the wonderful old Fleischer Superman cartoons, where the Man of Steel would constantly be pushed to his limits to defeat his foes and rescue his friends. It feels heroic and exciting in the extreme, and it is beautifully and powerfully rendered by Neal Adams. In fact, it’s such a cool cover, that I’ve been anxiously anticipating its approach in my lineup, quietly excited to read the story it represents. So, does the tale within live up to that dynamite image? Perhaps a better question is, could anything?

Sadly, although Wein and Dillin give us a good super-story inside, it isn’t quite the amazing epic that our cover promises us. It begins with Dr. Fate helping the police to recover a stolen “thermal-ray,” which is apparently insanely dangerous for a hand weapon, but the technological marvel and its erstwhile criminal owners are a poor match for the master of magic, who simply causes the device’s trigger to disappear! That’s a wonderfully clever and straightforward solution to the threat. However, his heroics are soon interrupted by an emergency call from…the hospital?? Apparently this Dr. Fate is a literal medical doctor, which was completely news to me. I always knew him as an archaeologist, but apparently, his earliest appearances had him sharing his fellow Justice Society member, Dr. Mid-Nite’s profession. Who knew? Surprisingly, what awaits the good doctor at the hospital is not your average case but an ailing alien! The strange-looking being telepathically communicates the mental message that “Earth is doomed!” The medical magician is left stunned, realizing that he must save this creature’s life, or its secret will die with it, and so may the Earth itself!

Meanwhile, our other heroic headliner is hanging out on a satellite above Earth 1, contemplating his magical misadventure from the previous issue. We find Superman lamenting the fact that he has two whole weaknesses in his otherwise invulnerable form. Boo-freaking-hoo, the poor sun-god is only mostly invulnerable! Just then, the morose Man of Steel hits upon the idea of seeking succor from one of his mystical allies and heads out to consult the Mistress of Magic, Zatanna. On the way, he casually disposes of a radioactive dust cloud by sucking it into his lungs and then blowing it into the sun. Yep, clearly he’s not powerful enough! Unfortunately, Zatanna tells the Action Ace that she can’t help him, because her father told her that “to know how our powers work would cause them to stop working!” Now, I don’t know, but I’m pretty sure that just means that Zatarra didn’t feel like answering a young Zatanna’s questions…I do enjoy Zatanna just casually doing crazy magic as she talks to Supes, almost like she’s rubbing it in.

Having exhausted his options on Earth 1, Kal conceives of an alternative, and he goes to visit his other spell-slinging friend, Dr. Fate, on Earth 2. The Man of Tomorrow arrives just in time to help his fellow hero with his unusual patient, and mage teleports them to his tower and fills his guest in on the plot. Apparently this alien was just hanging out in the sky over a city and was struck by a plane (imagine being the pilot and trying to report that!). I suppose you’ve got to be prepared for things like this when you live in the DC Universe. The Arcane Avenger supernaturally scans his patient’s mind and discovers images of two landmarks, a Mayan temple and Stone Henge, and the heroes split up to investigate the mysterious threat facing the world.

Dr. Fate travels to the Mayan temple, only to discover another alien just “sitting” in the sky, meditating, and ignoring him. When the occult hero presses his case, the strange being casually causes the surrounding flora to grow and attack, and the wizardly warrior has to employ his magical might to escape from the plant-based peril, literally blowing up some one of the hungrier heinous herbs from the inside! It’s a nice little sequence, and Dillin renders it well. However, just when Fate is ready to grab his alien attacker, the being simply vanishes!

On the other side of the world, Superman doesn’t have much better luck in England, where the same pattern repeats itself, though with a giant formed from the ground itself in place of the sinister shrubbery that attacked his ally. The sand is too soft for the Man of Might’s blows to have much of an impact, so he tries a different tack, turning the entire colossus into glass with his heat vision, and shattering it with a powerful blow, another really cool sequence, with an honestly clever resolution. Yet, just as with Fate, the mysterious meditator vanishes when approached. What could these baffling beings be up to? Well, as the heroes prepare to regroup, they each encounter strangely sudden natural disasters, with Dr. Fate stopping a rampaging tidal wave and Superman saving a city from an unexpected volcanic eruption.

Comparing notes, the dauntless duo discover that the continents of Earth 2 are being drawn together, and the planet is heading towards an apocalyptic ending! Risking another probe of their injured alien, they discover that he was a member of the Buudak, the “high lamas” of an ancient race, who are seeking an interplanetary Nirvana, one that can only be found through the release of energies resulting from the destruction of the Earth! The heroes confront the alien trio as they prepare their final psychic attack, but both might and magic prove futile. In desperation, the dauntless dyad decide to combine their abilities, and Dr. Fate channels his preternatural power into the Metropolis Marvel, giving him mystical might to match his star-born strength.

The supercharged Superman is able to shrug off the alien’s attacks, smashing their psychic shield, and the terrible trio vanish as their own powers consume them. However, despite their defeat, the world is not yet saved, and the continents continue to converge! The master of magic reclaims his power and forges occult chains, and Superman hauls the rogue land masses back into place! The adventure ends with the world restored and with the Man of Might having decided that his vulnerability is for the best after all because…and see if you can follow this, he was only able to save the day because Fate’s magic could effect him…though one wonders just how often such a situation is going to arise. To be fair, the Kryptonian’s actual last thought makes more sense, as he notes that “a little humility is good even for a Superman.” That is almost certainly true, and in fact, I might say “especially good”.

Muddled moral aside, this was a pretty fun issue. Dr. Fate and Superman make for an unusual team, and it is interesting to see them in action together. They are in many ways opposites in terms of their powersets, with one being a physical juggernaut, while the other is a magical powerhouse. It’s a pairing that we don’t see too often, and I enjoyed the casual yet logical reason behind their team-up. Superman just happens to show up looking for answers, and he drops into an adventure already in progress. Good enough, and it makes the world of DC feel a bit more interconnected. The incredibly powerful alien lamas made for solid antagonists, though I would have liked to know a bit more about them. Their objective, spiritual enlightenment at all costs, is also an unusual one, adding an interesting twist on the standard ‘destroy the world’ plot, but their casual dismissal of the lives they’re about to destroy does raise some questions about their ethos! Our heroes’ efforts make for an entertaining and exciting tale, especially in the first half. Unfortunately, the final confrontation and climax aren’t as successful. Dillin makes the first challenges the team faces visually interesting and fun, especially Superman’s fight with the sand giant, but the last attack isn’t nearly as engaging, though it is serviceable enough. The real problem with this story, and it is a minor one, is that Dillin’s portrayal of that wonderfully dramatic moment from the cover just simply pales in comparison. It’s fairly uninspiring rather than the show-stopping scene it really should be. Still, if the worst you can say about a comic is that it has one moment that isn’t as impressive as its cover, then you’re not doing too badly! In the end, this is a really enjoyable adventure, if not quite as epic and memorable as the cover promised. I’ll give it a strong 4 Minutemen.


Final thoughts


Well, with these three books, we have reached the end of December 1971, and an interesting end it is! This month saw quite a collection of comics, with few high highs but several quite low lows. Nonetheless, we had an unusual number of moderately high scoring books this month, with a lot of them earning 4 Minutemen, even if few scored higher. Overall, it was a fairly enjoyable month of comics, with several pleasant surprises along the way, including Action Comics, Adventure‘s new Zatanna backup, The Creeper’s guest spot, Superman‘s plankton-fueled panic, and more. There were a few real clunkers, though, with the master of madcap plots, Zaney Haney, turning in two terrible tales that even his insane energy can’t save. We’re seeing some books dragging, like Teen Titans, while others, like Jimmy Olsen have hopefully begun to recover, though Kirby’s 4th World work is so wild and uneven, there’s no promise of that. One thing is certain, both Zaney Haney and the King will have something unique and creative for us next month, whether it sinks or swims.

In terms of themes, this has been a fascinating month, with many a book aiming at a significance that its story can’t quite match. Nonetheless, there are some really interesting attempts to tackle heavier ideas in this batch of books, and the social relevance revolution is on full display. We’ve got obvious examples, like Green Lantern / Green Arrow, which attempted to address racism in O’Neil’s usual rather ham-handed fashion, but which did succeed in achieving some real importance by introducing John Stewart, a new black hero who would go on to become an excellent and worthwhile addition to the DC Universe. If his portrayal in this first appearance was rather one-note, his very existence was still rather remarkable. The Green Arrow backup also aimed at relevance, and with a fair amount of success too. That unusual ground that tale trod had to feel particularly revolutionary in 1971, with Ollie questioning how much good a superhero could actually do in light of the social problems plaguing the country. O’Neil’s attempts at verisimilitude and relevance are effective, if rather depressing.

Though the issues that percolate in the background of the story are vague and unexplored, the sense of unrest and tension fits with what we’ve been seeing in many of the other other books that have tried to take on such themes. In fact, we find that this idea has plenty of company this month. Interestingly, we see just that same vague sense of tension, especially among the youth, reflected in Justice League, where we meet an ersatz Jimi Hendrix. Of course, the most fascinating element in that story was its look at the plight of Vietnam veterans, though sadly it was given little more than a glimpse. This issue does recognize the power that music was playing in the counter-cultural movement, a concept which we also see show up in much more fantastic and strange fashion in Superman’s visit to the “discotheque.” Unfortunately, Jimi Hendrix never quite managed managed to rock hard enough to bring down a literal roof.

Nonetheless, we can see how much DC comics have changed in just a year, with so many different teams on so many different titles attempting to engage the tumultuous culture of their day to a degree that was much more rare when we started our journey. One of the most unexpected of these attempts was our backup Kid Flash tale, which featured another wealthy businessman as an antagonist, which is becoming a much more common trope, but which also focused, not on environmentalism as has already become common, but instead on nutrition. That really surprised me, showing up in 1971, as I think of that as a much more modern concern. Heck, I grew up in the 80s, where preservatives and all manner of additives in our super-processed food was just the norm! It’s the carcinogens that make it tasty!

Social relevance wasn’t the only connection to the real world that we saw in our books this month. We also got to see the first appearance of the Rutland Halloween Parade in DC Comics, which was quite entertaining, though that issue did have some problems with tone, combining the light-hearted fun with the heavy drama of holocaust survivors and escaped Nazi war criminals…real laugh-a-minute stuff! Despite its rather schizophrenic tone, it did manage to be an interesting and memorable issue. After all, it’s not every day you see Batman sharing the page with Thor and Spider-Man!

All-in-all, there were a lot of really entertaining reads this month, and we saw a lot of great art in the pages of our various books, even when the stories themselves weren’t quite as good. Pleasantly, even when the main tales tank, I find myself really enjoying several of our backups, like The World of Krypton, Rose and Thorn, and especially the new Zatanna feature. I’m really looking forward to seeing what comes out of that one. Despite its unevenness, I’m still excited about reading the rest of the 4th World as it develops. Though there are several runs that I find myself wishing would end, there is still plenty to be excited about. I wonder what next month will bring us!

Well, there’s only one way to find out! I hope that y’all will join me again soon(ish) for another edition of Into the Bronze Age! I’ll be posting a tribute to our fallen friend, Cyber Burn first, and I hope that y’all will join me for that as well and honor his memory. Until next time, keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: December 1971 (Part 4)

Hello folks, and welcome back to Into the Bronze Age! It’s an all-Super edition of our little project, featuring three different Super-centric titles! They are a very mixed bag of books, capturing the uneven, transitional nature of this part of the Bronze Age, all within the Superman Family. We’ve got some Silver Age-y silliness, along with some early bronze Age attempts at relevance. It’s quite the collection. So, without further ado, let’s see what Superman was up to this month!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #407
  • Adventure Comics #413
  • Batman #237
  • Detective Comics #418
  • The Flash #211
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #87
  • Justice League of America #95
  • Mr. Miracle #5
  • Phantom Strange #16
  • Superboy #180
  • Superman #246 (#245 was all reprints)
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #117
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #144
  • Teen Titans #36
  • World’s Finest #208

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superboy #180


Cover Artist: Curt Swan
“Prince of the Wolf-Pack!”
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: Bob Brown
Inker: Murphy Anderson


“Clark Kent, Madcap Millionaire!”
Writer: Leo Dorfman
Penciler: Bob Brown
Inker: Murphy Anderson

Yikes, guys. So, the Superboy title has often been a slog in my project, a source of goofy and senseless stories, more farce than fun, but this is one of the sillier, dumber yarns we’ve yet encountered, at least if you’re not counting Superbaby stories! I’ve been watching this ridiculous cover getting closer in my book list, and I’ve almost been dreading it. The central image seems to promise a good deal of silliness, and I can’t say that my trepidation wasn’t justified. To be fair, the goofy cover image is entirely accurate about what lies within. Now, the idea of Superboy displaying animalistic qualities isn’t necessarily a bad one, and there’s no real reason that it couldn’t have produced an interesting and exciting visual. The trouble is that Swan doesn’t really go far enough to sell the idea. Superboy is running with a pack of wolves, but he just looks like Superboy hunched over in a stupid-looking pose rather than something really strange and mysterious. It is much more out of place than it is intimidating. Yet, as dumb as the cover image is, the story inside is worse. I suppose that should come as no surprise, as it’s penned by that master of literary madness, Bob Haney, and in this story, he just about out-Haney’s himself.

It begins with an alien probe crashing on the Moon and releasing a strange radiation. Meanwhile, Pa Kent hears a wolf howling in the night outside their farm and rushes outside to kill it, noting that wolves haven’t been seen in those parts in years. Unbeknownst to elder Kent, a malevolent looking man named Adrian Lykan (because the story is about wolves, see?) is watching him and plotting his destruction….for reasons! The same evening, Superboy is walking alone, spending a whole two seconds in introspection and wrestling with an angst that is instantly forgotten, when he is transformed by the mysterious alien probe. Except…not really. It takes away his super powers and replaces them with…wolf…powers, I guess? He doesn’t turn into a Super-were-boy or anything. He just hunches over and looks silly, like on the cover. He also apparently gains the power to telepathically communicate with the pack of wolves which is conveniently hanging out nearby. They accept him as their leader and run through town.

And here it gets even dumber. The Mayor and the other Smallville-ites immediately turn on Superboy because he’s running with the wolves and set out to kill him. Yep. They flat-out decide to murder their former hero with Kryptonite bullets (man everyone had some of that stuff back in the day), just because he’s acting strangely. Don’t bother to investigate or help the kid. Nope, just shoot him in the face. Well, while the terrible townsfolk gather the pitchforks and torches, Lykan sets his plan in motion. The evil man, who apparently likes being evil because he’s all evil and such, has decided to destroy the “most moral citizen” in Smallville, and that’s apparently Kent. Why does he want to do this? What does he hope to gain? Well, this is Zaney Haney, and he has no time for “logic” or “motivations”!

How does Lykan plan to destroy Kent? Is he going to use his magic powers to curse the upright man? Mind control him? Take his shape and frame him? No, don’t be silly. Instead, and try to follow me here, he poses as a contractor, gets Kent, as town treasurer, to hire him for a job, gets paid in cash by Kent who is in a hurry to help his son, fakes work papers for illegal Mexican laborers, brings them in to do the job, and then poses as someone else in an attempt to blackmail Kent about the whole business, setting him up as a patsy. Did you follow all that? If not, don’t worry; I’m sure you’re not alone, as it doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. And I haven’t even gotten to the mystical wolf-guardians yet. Hang on to your cape!

So, as Lykan’s plot is unfolding, the townsfolk hunt Superwolf and his pack and straight-up shoot the kid with a Kryptonite bullet. Fortunately, one of the Mexican workers saves him and takes out the bullet, and because he has lost his powers, the alien mineral doesn’t affect him. Lucky break, that. While he recovers, Pa Kent goes to get the unwittingly illegal immigrants and sets out to hide them away until he can sort things out. On the way, however, Lykan uses his magic to hijack the truck and drive it off a bridge, only for the workers to be rescued by the werewolf-wonder’s wolves. Who knew that one of a wolf’s abilities was super-swimming!

Meanwhile, Chief Parker arrests Kent because of the frame job against him, and the town brings in a wolf hunter who is actually Lykan in disguise…for reasons? He tracks and attacks Superboy, using magic AND a gun, which just seems like overkill, shooting the kid a second time! This is an unusually violent issue! The Lupine Marvel holds him off until his pack arrives and chases the warlock away. Just as Clark is about to die, the alien probe that conveniently gave him wolf powers even more conveniently shuts off, restoring his powers and saving his life. The pack slink off into the night, and we’re told that wolves, far from causing evil, apparently are secretly holy beings that show up to combat evil when it appears….somehow….for….reasons.

As Lady Grey said when I described this tangled mess of a tale, “Well, that certainly is a story…” That’s really about all you can say for it. It’s so silly, unnecessarily convoluted, and poorly developed that it almost defies description. It is a pretty perfect example of the negative side of Zaney Haney’s excesses. Yes, it is full of creative ideas and rapid-fire invention, but all of these new elements are lacking any sense of purpose or significance. We get a bizarre marriage of magic and science between the wolves, warlocks and rogue satellites, and it all moves at the speed of plot, with no effort to make any of it make sense. It’s just weird, silly, and unsatisfying. There’s nothing that justifies this story being a Superboy story, as even his powerset is swapped out for whatever the heck Haney wanted. You could plug almost any other character in here, and it would make as much (or as little) sense. The art is fine throughout, though Brown’s portrayal of Superwolf is just goofy looking. It would even have been more effective for him to have actually physically transformed. That also could have helped justify the townspeople’s insane reaction to his change. I’ll give this bizarre yarn a single sad Minuteman, as it really has nothing to recommend it, lacking even the exuberant fun of many of Haney’s crazy stories.

P.S.: Interestingly, the letters column includes a fascinating and mysterious missive (bottom of left column), in which the writer complains about Superboy’s excessive happiness and lack of angst and suggests the addition of a supporting character with some horrific type of hang-up, the details of which the editors refuse to print, citing the Comics Code. One can’t help but wonder what kind of tragic issue or scandalous story was suggested. Notably, the editor’s reply offers an argument that I generally find quite compelling, citing the need for escapism and joy in comics. Given the nature of this cover story, however, I find myself wishing that such efforts would nonetheless acquire a bit more quality and craftsmanship, in addition to their search for the strange and whimsical!


“Clark Kent: Madcap Millionaire”


Our backup tale is not as dumb as the headliner, but it is still rather silly and very Silver Age-y. This story revolves around an almost unknown relative of the Kents, a rich uncle (doesn’t everyone have one?), who I thought had been conjured ex nihilo in the style of Bob Haney. Yet, this random guy has actually shown up exactly one other time that I can discover, in Superboy #119. According to the DC Database, he will have one more appearance, in Superman Family #191, years later. At any rate, this Kendall is fabulously wealthy, but he has no children, and he is trying to bribe Clark to into letting him adopt the extraterrestrial orphan. After all, that is clearly the only logical solution to his situation. Heaven forbid he, I don’t know, adopt any other kid who needs a family.

Well, despite the fact that the Kents are sure that Clark won’t pay any attention to the wealth Kendall can give him, the young man suddenly becomes very enthusiastic and jumps into a fancy sports car….which he then proceeds to crash directly into a wall. Surviving the fiery explosion uninjured somehow doesn’t give away his secret identity, and the rather battered Boy of Steel turns on his parents and accepts his uncle’s offer. What is this? Superboy acting out of character? Yep, you guessed it, this story is a prime example of Superdickery, and as usual, an unjustified and silly one at that.

Clark gets up to various other antics, but it doesn’t take us long to discover his reasons for acting like a spoiled rich kid. While scuba diving in his uncle’s private lake, he rips open the old man’s raft, sending him careening to the shore, and then blows up the dam with his oxygen tank (which seems unlikely, even by comic logic). It turns out that the raft was full of poison gas, and if his uncle had fallen in when it deflated, he would have died. Uncle Kendall’s lawyer, Larry Frane, is the only other character we meet, and he tries to convince the old man not to adopt Clark. Gee, I wonder who the villain of the piece could be? Yep, the lawyer is essentially Checkov’s Mouthpiece.

It all comes to a head when Clark sees the lawyer plotting another deathtrap for Kendall, this one involving a strategically weakened railroad trestle. The Boy of Tomorrow swoops in and catches the larcenous lawyer in a trap of his own devising in a scene that looks for all the world like he is crushing the poor guy to death. Look at the terror on Frane’s face! After dealing with the death-threat, the Smallville Superhero confesses to his parents that he had discovered Frane’s fiendishness on that first day and had wrecked the car because it had a bomb in it. He pretended to be a spoiled brat to protect his uncle…because that was the only way. Sure. Let’s not forget that he kept up this charade when he spoke to his parents in private. So, essentially, our hero emotionally tortured his parents for no good reason. Yay?

Good heavens, first he’s emotionally torturing his parents, and now this! Someone stop this super-sociopath before he crushes that guy!

This is a fairly silly story, featuring a mostly unprecedented rich relative who is just a plot device, and a ‘barely there’ premise so thin you can just about see through it. This type of story is not my favorite at the best of times, but this particular example annoys me because it doesn’t make much effort to justify itself. Nobody has any personality or development, and our hero’s actions aren’t really justified. The art is quite good throughout, but it can’t save a sub-par story. I’ll give this one 2 Minutemen. It’s weak, but not as weird and wacky as our headliner.


Superman #246


Cover Artists: Curt SwanMurphy Anderson
“Danger–Monster At Work!”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler: Curt Swan
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Editor: Julius Schwartz


The Fabulous World of Krypton: “Marriage, Kryptonian Style!”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Rich Buckler
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Editor: Julius Schwartz


“There Is No Superman!”
Writer: Jerry Siegel
Inker: Stan Kaye
Editors: Whitney Ellsworth, Jack Schiff, Mort Weisinger, and Julius Schwartz

Well, if our Superboy issue was a disappointment, our flagship title might help make it up to us. Len Wein gives us an adventure that makes sense and has at least a little logical consistency, unlike our first two tales. Interestingly, although we have a classic example of a Superdickery cover here, the tale within is nothing of the sort. It’s a classic bait and switch, with our hero being a complete jerk on our cover in a fashion that has only the slenderest connection to his actual actions. The cover itself is solid enough, though not too much more than that. The blob-like monster’s destructive rampage is well-depicted, and Superman’s inexplicable disinterest could intrigue readers. The contrast makes for an odd and entertaining tableau.

Our actual headline tale begins in the middle of a thunderstorm, as our titular Superman dives deep down into the Marianas Trench in a rather nice sequence. He has come to collect samples of algae and plankton, and after a clam-related calamity, he resurfaces in time to lend aid to a ship swamped by the storm. In a fun little moment, a somewhat chagrined Superman berates himself for letting the clam catch him, thinking “Aquaman would never let himself get trapped by a giant clam!” I found that a charming touch, and it’s nice to see Clark being a bit more introspective and fallible in this small way.

Back on the surface, it turns out that the Man of Tomorrow was gathering the samples for the minds of tomorrow. That’s right, this is the first appearance of the organization that was fast to become a fixture of the DCU, S.T.A.R. Labs! That’s fun, and I’ve been wondering when it would show up. Interestingly, it isn’t given much fanfare or attention, just being used as a bit of set-dressing. I’m curious how long it will take before this perennial source of heroic support and mad-science threats will become ubiquitous in the pages of DC Comics.

Whatever lies in its future, at the moment S.T.A.R. has sent Superman to fetch samples from the depths of the ocean in the hopes that they will be the key to designing an organic pollution solution, an engineered algae that will assess corrupt matter and clean it automatically. Surely that could never go catastrophically wrong, right? Well, after dropping off the samples, the Metropolis Marvel returns home, and Wein gives us a lot of little character moments throughout these opening pages, providing more characterization and personality in 5 pages than we got in the entirety of our previous comic. As part of that, we get a charming moment where Clark drops in to check on his elderly, ailing neighbor. His doing so also opens the door to a rather odd subplot in the story, as he hears about a group of his neighbors who are arming themselves and forming a vigilante committee because the streets have become dangerous. Mr. Mild Mannered makes the case that they shouldn’t take the law into their own hands, which is deeply ironic considering what he does in his free time. If you’re wondering what this has to do with deep-sea algae, well, you’re not alone.

Speaking of Superman’s samples, back at the lab, a scientist makes a breakthrough in his experiments with it but accidentally drops several beakers into the sink, sending the mad-science mixture into the sewers! Later on, the Man of Steel goes for a patrol in the still-raging storm, and we get a very interesting panel in the style of Kirby’s experiments with combining photos and drawings, as our hero flies through a city-scape. I think this is more successful than most I’ve seen, as Swan and Anderson manage to merge the two images a bit more effectively than is usually the case. During his patrol, the Last Son of Krypton discovers a strange gelatinous monster rise from the sewer and threaten civilians, but when he pursues it, he discovers that it is actually cleaning the sewers as it goes! Thinking that this thing could do the city some good, he decides to just try to drive it through the sewers before disposing of it. It works like a charm, for a little while, and then the green growth suddenly explodes into the street and begins to devour all in its path, not just pollution!

Superman finds this creature to be a difficult foe, as he can’t seem to hurt it, despite his great strength, and it constantly oozes out of his grip. Finally, he strikes upon an idea and creates a whirlwind to suck the ooze into the ozonosphere, where he reasons the oxygen-rich environment will weaken it, as “no organism alive can survive in the poisons of its own waste products,” and since this creature gives off oxygen, oxygen should presumably be the one thing it can’t process. The Man of Steel’s skyward gambit pays off, and the creature is weakened enough for him to bind it in plastic and return it to S.T.A.R. Labs for study (I’m sure they’ll keep it safe and definitely not endanger the city with their further experiments…). Oddly, the story ends, not with our hero’s success, but with his return to his apartment, where the gun-toting yahoos we met earlier have managed to accidentally shoot an innocent bystander. Superman speeds his wounded neighbor to the hospital and says “I told you so” to a now chastened group of vigilantes who, for some reason, aren’t being arrested for shooting someone!

This is really a solid story, not exceptional or earth-shattering, but a good, entertaining yarn that presents our hero with an interesting challenge and manages to provide a bit of characterization and some fun moments along the way. Wein provides a logic for everything that happens, and it all feels like a good Superman adventure, with the hero faced with an opponent he can’t merely overpower. Wein comes up with a clever solution to this problem, and even better, the solution makes sense, in a comic-science kind of way. The little touches, like the episode with the clam, or a moment where the blob steals a smoker’s cigarette are fun and help to make this tale more than just a standard monster-mash. The only real flaw is the completely unconnected subplot about armed vigilantes. It receives almost no attention and has absolutely no impact on the main plot, making it feel out of place. The art, for its part, is quite good throughout, with Swan and Anderson doing a really nice job with the somewhat dim, rainy setting that is found throughout the story. It gives this tale an unusually moody, atmospheric feel for a Superman yarn. Overall, this is a fine, fun comic, and worth an above average 4 Minutemen. It’s a pleasant relief from the silly stories of our first book in this batch.


“Marriage, Kryptonian Style”


Once again, the World of Krypton backup proves to be an interesting and entertaining slice of sci-fi to complement our feature story. This issue’s offering is rather intriguing, considering how the interpretation of Krypton will change in coming years. It is all about a rather surprisingly dystopian concept for the pre-Crisis version of Krypton, a massive computer, Matricomp, that controls who can marry who. It isn’t quite as dark as such concepts usually are these days, as people are not normally paired together arbitrarily or without their consent. Instead, they form their own relationships and merely come to the computer to see if they are compatible for marriage. It is such a journey that young Jor-El and Lara Lor-Van undertake, but when they present themselves to the machine, it does not give them an immediate answer, which is unusual. Jor remains sanguine, but Lara is worried, and as it turns out, rightfully so!

The next day, she is approached by an attendant from the computer complex named Anr-Mu (and I can’t wrap my head around how to pronounce that!), who informs her that the device found her and Jor-El incompatible and their marriage has been forbidden. She refuses to give up and goes to question the computer, only for Matricomp to tell her that the only man on the planet with whom she is compatible is Anr. What a coincidence! Clearly nothing nefarious going on here! Lara doesn’t take kindly to being paired up with a stranger, but Anr tries to hypnotize her, only to be interrupted by the timely intervention of Jor-El. However, the fighting scientist’s attack is easily shrugged off, and Anr takes a pacified Lara away.

Fortunately, though Jor may lack his future-son’s super strength, he’s still a very smart guy, and he manages to solve the mystery behind these strange events. He confronts Matricomp with the revelation that the computer is actually the cause of his troubles. Apparently, the great machine, being wholly devoted to shepherding love, has become enamored with the idea of love itself. It created an android, Anr-Mu, and through him sought to experience love for itself. After handily explaining its plot, the corrupted computer tries to crispy-fry its challenger with an electrical burst. Yet once again the great scientist proves his brilliance, having worn rubber clothing that protects him from the zap. Thwarted, Matricomp commits synthetic suicide, blowing itself up, but Jor manages to escape and reunite with Lara, free to create their own destiny.

This is a good little backup tale, with an interesting premise that is a curious glimpse of a more dystopian version of Krypton, something similar to the sterile, dehumanized world that John Byrne would conjure in the next decade. Bates delivers a quick but complete adventure in these 8 pages, with an intriguing addition to the mythos. I have rather enjoyed these tales that feature a two-fisted version of Jor-El. It reminds me of the glimpses we get of the more heroic version of the character from Superman: TAS. I’ll give this solid backup a strong 4 Minutemen.


Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane


“S.O.S. – from Tomorrow!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Werner Roth
Inker: Vince Colletta
Editor: E. Nelson Bridwell


Lady Danger: “The Needle in the Haystack!”
Penciler: Carmine Infantino
Inker: Carmine Infantino


Rose and the Thorn: “The Ghost with Two Faces!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Rich Buckler
Inker: Dick Giordano

Love must be in the air…along with mind control. This month we learned about marriage, “Kryptonian Style,” and we also get an issue of Lois Lane where the relationship between Superman and our headlining heroine is a bit more developed and overt than we usually see. More importantly, it’s a story with an intriguing premise and setting that doesn’t quite live up to its potential, once again displaying Kanigher’s active imagination and somewhat uneven writing. However, if the tale itself isn’t everything it could be, the cover is pretty spectacular. Roth delivers a really striking image, inviting us into the disorientation of our stars as they stare at a world “turned upside-down!” It’s a nice piece, and Roth has added a lot of detail to the topsy-turvy terrain, as well as two of his traditional beautifully drawn figures. It’s a great piece and very effective. Unfortunately, it’s rather more exciting than the story it heralds.

The actual adventure begins with some unseen figure sending a message in a bottle, only for it to be struck by lightning and hurled through time! That’s an intriguing opening, but back in the ‘present,’ Morgan Edge is chewing out his two top reporters, Clark Kent and Lois Lane, because it is a slow news day, which I’m sure makes for just dynamite leadership. Interestingly, once they leave he opens a secret screen on his desk and gazes at…himself! The multiple Morgan mystery remains, but it won’t be solved this issue. Meanwhile, Lois hits the town trying to find a story, but everything is quite, other than the silent struggle of the drug epidemic and its cost, but as a cynical doctor says, that is hardly front page material at this point. With nothing newsworthy happening, Superman drops in to take Lois out on a date, and they share a romantic afternoon, which is a little strange to me, as I’m more used to a Superman who keeps Lois a bit more at arm’s length, but this is the same era that gave us that bonkers book with Superman having a family dinner with his wife and son while in full costume. Anyway, during the date, Lois finds our time-traveling letter in a bottle, and it is an S.O.S. from 2196…the future!

The pair decide to investigate this mysterious missive, and they travel to a future divided between two classes, the “Upmen” and the “Downmen”. Apparently the “Upmen” seized control of the world through “tle,” a powerful drug that keeps the lower class subservient and docile. Those who refuse to be drugged are hunted down like dogs, and it is in the middle of such a hunt that our heroes arrive. The Man of Steel easily protects a group of the down-trodden Downmen from their upper-class oppressors, but once the powers that be see his strength, they offer a truce and a tour of their world. The time-tossed twosome are treated to a feast, only to be drugged with tle. In a welcome if not entirely effective sop to logic, we’re told that this drug is alien in origin, and Superman theorizes that it must have originated on a planet with a red sun, explaining its ability to affect him. I can accept an alien drug affecting him, but the plant coming originally from a world with a red sun makes no real sense, of course. It’s not like the current crop has “red sun radiation” in it or anything.

Dubious story logic aside, our drugged protagonists then face a rather odd adventure. They are made pliant by tle and sent to hunt the Downmen hiding in the woods, with an objective set for a tower on the other side of the forest, but they just sort of wander through the undergrowth on a high for a while. Then the substance wears off, and they face terrible withdrawals, including bizarre hallucinations. Finally, they reach the tower, and Lois refuses to stay behind, which is brave and all, but a little silly considering that we’re talking about Superman. What exactly does she think she’s going to contribute to this little assault?

The tower defenders shoot them with gas which messes with their equilibrium, as we saw on the cover, but seeing as the Metropolis Marvel regularly flies around the world, this isn’t really all that effective. With a rather odd looking kick, the literal Man of Tomorrow smashes the tower and captures the Upmen, finally leading their downtrodden slaves in burning the tle fields before returning home.

So, I’m guessing this is Kanigher’s attempt at an anti-drug story, following in the footsteps of O’Neil’s recent groundbreaking Green Arrow/Green Lantern yarn. It’s less focused and less successful, though the depiction of withdrawal symptoms is interesting, and it is certainly unusual for Superman, of all characters, to be the one depicted as strung-out. The central anti-drug message is obscured by the trappings of the future setting, including the fact that the drug is mandatory rather than being a temptation. The plot is also a bit confusing and contradictory, with our heroes being drugged and sent to hunt the Downmen, only to just sort of wander about, with the tower made their objective, but also being forbidden….it’s odd and doesn’t quite make sense. What exactly is the Upmen’s plan here? It’s still an enjoyable story, with some nice action beats that work better than some of Roth’s earlier efforts. In general, his art is excellent throughout. As odd as it is to see the Man of freaking Steel paddling a canoe in the park, Roth really does great work with the romance elements of his stories. Yet, his portrayal of the withdrawal scene works okay too, though the melodrama is turned up to 11. In the end, this is an odd, uneven, and rather poorly thought-out offering on the drug question, though it isn’t a bad read. I’ll give it 2.5 Minutemen, as the adventure is serviceable, even if the themes don’t get developed properly.


The Ghost with Two Faces


As has often been the case, our Rose and Thorn backup blows the headliner away, delivering a good, solid adventure story with some neat touches. It begins with the clueless young Rose watching footage of her alter-ego, the Thorn, taking out some bank robbers in a really cool sequence that actually makes it look believable that this lovely lady could take out an entire group of lethal gunsels. That night, Rose dreams of a strange house, inside of which lies a mystery she must solve. When she leaves for vacation the next day, she actually discovers the house from her dreams and rents it, even though it is supposedly haunted. In a clever touch, the girl receives a Thorn costume in the mail and is confused by it, though readers realize it clearly must have been sent by her other personality, as her innocent side obviously wouldn’t have packed it for her vacation. I like that attention to detail.

By day Rose bathes on the lonely beach by her rented house, but by night, the Baleful Beauty takes over, and she stalks the sands, searching for a kidnapped newspaper publisher and his wife. Although a night-traveling naturalist manages to snap a photo of her, the Nymph of Night runs her quarry to ground, and in another really nice sequence, she takes out the kidnap gang and frees their prisoners. The next day, Rose is startled to discover that the “ghost” of the house has been captured on camera, and it is none other than the Vixen of Vengeance herself, the Thorn!

This is a fun, fast-paced tale, with a surprising amount of personality packed into its few pages. The story clearly doesn’t take long to summarize, and yet it was a good read. My only complaint is that the dream about the house is a bit ambiguous. Are we supposed to understand that the Thorn was already working on the case, and she wanted Rose to use the house as a base? It doesn’t actually play any role in the plot, other than putting her in the vicinity of the kidnappers. We also don’t really get time to develop any of the story’s elements very much, but Kanigher keeps the plot simple enough that it doesn’t need too much more space. Nonetheless, this action-packed adventure made for an enjoyable yarn. This month we’ve got Rich Buckler taking over the art chores, but Dick Giordano is still inking, and the pair of them make for a heck of a team. The art is gorgeous and atmospheric, really nicely suited to the character. The action looks particularly good, and Buckler’s layouts are really dynamic. I know Buckler mostly from his work on Fantastic Four, which is good, but I think the work he does here is even better. Interestingly, though he did both this and the Krypton story from this month, they look pretty different. I guess that’s the impact an inker can have, and I think Anderson is often rather heavy-handed, to create more continuity with Swan’s work. Whatever the case with the art anomalies, I’ll give this fun romp a solid 4 Minutemen.


Well, that does it for our Super-story-extravaganza! And a very mixed bag of Kryptonian hi jinks it was. We had some solid yarns and some intensely silly ones, featuring social issues from pollution to drugs. Nonetheless, I had a good time reading them, especially given the darkness of the day. I hope that my coverage of these comics has been a pleasant diversion for y’all, dear readers! I also hope that you’ll join me again soon (hopefully!), when we’ll finish up this month and continue our journey Into the Bronze Age! Until then, keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: December 1971 (Part 3)

Welcome back to our voyage into the Bronze Age! Once again life has intervened and rather spectacularly ruined my plans for a quicker turn around on this little feature. Things have been difficult here in the Greylands, though I suppose that they are indeed difficult in most places these days. For those of you that pray, I’d appreciate your prayers. We are physically and materially okay, but we are feeling rather worn-down by life at the moment, and there may be more difficult challenges on our horizon. Here’s hoping that 2021 may yet bring us all brighter days.

However, when life gets you down, there are few better escapes than the wonderful world of superhero comics, especially this particularly exuberant variety from the Bronze Age, so let us see what strange marvels the next bit of this month holds for us!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #407
  • Adventure Comics #413
  • Batman #237
  • Detective Comics #418
  • The Flash #211
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #87
  • Justice League of America #95
  • Mr. Miracle #5
  • Phantom Strange #16
  • Superboy #180
  • Superman #246 (#245 was all reprints)
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #117
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #144
  • Teen Titans #36
  • World’s Finest #208

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Justice League of America #95


Cover Artists: Neal Adams

“The Private War of Johnny Dune!”
Writer: Mike Friedrich
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella

Editor: Julius Schwartz

“How He Began”: Dr. Mid-Nite
Writer: Charles Reizenstein
Artist: Stan Aschmeier

“The Origin of…Doctor Fate”
Writer: Gardner Fox
Artist: Howard Sherman

We’ve got a very interesting story to kick off this set of comics, a tale that wholeheartedly steers into the relevance push of the early Bronze Age, combining a number of different contemporary issues in its plot. The result is a story that is rather fascinating as a representative of its era, even if the plot itself leaves something to be desired. The tale has a solid, if unexceptional cover. Adams’ rendering of our titular antagonist, Johnny Dune, is colorful and interesting, even if he is just wearing “normal” clothes. Well….normal is a relative term in the 70s. Let’s just say that he’s not wearing a costume. The piece captures the basic idea of the conflict, with Johnny having hypnotized the League. I do enjoy the miniature figure of the Tiny Titan trotting along at his feet. It’s not the most exciting of covers, but it does its job and sets the stage reasonably well.

And the show that plays upon that stage begins, not with our titular antagonist Johnny himself, but with Batman and Aquaman preparing to teleport up to the JLA Satellite, only to be scooped up by Superman, who dramatically declares that he is trying to prevent their deaths! In a two-page spread that gives us a nice cross-section of the Satellite, he transports the heroes to their headquarters, and we discover that Flash, Green Lantern, and Hawkman disappeared in some type of teleporter disaster. Fortunately, the world’s greatest detective is on the case!

Meanwhile, we are introduced to the young man from the cover, Johnny Dune, a Vietnam veteran returning home to a country that doesn’t want him. We learn that he fought in several battles of that terrible war, eventually getting wounded and facing certain death at the hands of advancing North Vietnamese troops. In a moment of agony and anger, he cried out for them to stop, and strangely enough, they did. Thus Johnny Dune discovered that he was a mutant with the power to control people with his voice. Despite his newfound power, the young man finds nothing but closed doors and rather unnecessarily discouraging “No Help Wanted!” signs when he returns home. Really, I don’t think it’s necessary to advertise that you don’t have any jobs available. It’s usually the other way around. It’s also interesting that the comic uses the word “mutant”, as you don’t tend to see that term show up as often at DC, given its association with Marvel. Of course, at this point, the original X-Men title had been cancelled, and we were still years away from the beginning of Chris Claremont’s legendary run.

That’s…really not all that impressive…

Next, we jump forward in time and join Green Arrow and the Atom as they perform an exhibition for a youth event. And it turns out that they are the opening act for…Johnny Dune, who has become a successful musician. That’s a sharp turn! We jump back and see that the rising star had approached one of the city’s political bosses, wanting to run for mayor (man, there must be something in the air; everyone’s getting into politics in the DCU!). Johnny is dedicated to addressing the somewhat vague social problems plaguing the city, including poverty, drugs, and violence. He warns that the kids are restless and angry but promises that he can calm things down, thanks to his star power. The rocker offers to play free concerts to help cool the situation off, only to be betrayed by the wheelers and dealers afterward.

In revenge, Johnny uses his power to hypnotize his current crowd into following him, as he leads them, Pied Piper style, out of the city. When the Emerald Archer and the Six-Inch Super-Sleuth try to stop him, the would-be musical messiah sics his audience on them. The heroes hold their own for a while, but get taken out by one random big dude, the first of many unimpressive showings by our heroes in this issue. You know, Ollie getting his lumps from an average guy is one thing, but the Atom getting casually taken out by a backhand is something else. I suppose that’s often how his stories go, though. No-one can touch the shrinking superhero…until the plot requires it.

I do quite enjoy Ollie’s misplaced confidence here.

Well, our pummeled protagonists manage to get off a distress call, just as Batman has solved the mystery of their teammates’ disappearances.. The Dark Knight theorizes that the trio intercepted a Zeta-Beam and got zapped to Rann, a theory proven a moment later, as Green Lantern manages to contact the team with a distress call of his own. The team splits up, with Superman headed to space to succor the heroes on Rann, while Batman and Black Canary take the Batjet to aid their other allies. In a cool moment, Aquaman is the one who takes charge and makes the plan. Its coolness is counteracted, however, by the fact that he decides to stay on the Satellite and coordinate things….for no particular reason. This is the last time he shows up in the story. So, why was he included in the first place?

The Gotham Guardian and the Bird Lady parachute into the fray, immediately beset by Dune’s disciples. Fortunately for them, they are so focused on their fighting, that they resist his voice, but then he sics his captive heroes on them, and the new comers just…let their teammates pummel them. We get a line about how they can’t bring themselves to fight, but this isn’t a life and death matter yet, so that just seems like another cop-out. With all the Leagures lassoed, our generic Jimi Hendrix heads down the highway, his brainwashed followers behind him.

Yet, along the way, Dune begins to lose control, and some of the kids start wrecking fences. When the musician can’t stop them, he sends Green Arrow to deal with the troublemakers. At first the Ace Archer can’t resist his commands, but in a moment when his captor is distracted by the chaos, the hero seizes his chance. Stopping up his ears, Odysseus-style, the Battling Bowman use a “suction cup arrow” to shut the singer’s trap, then clobbers him. This breaks the spell, and the kids run wild. So the heroes….bravely beat up a bunch of teenagers…? Yep, and even more oddly, Friedrich’s overblown narration plays it as a moment of great heroism.

But none of this is what Johnny Dune wanted, so seeing the destruction his former disciples are dishing-out, he frees himself and commands the crowd to turn their anger on him, instead. They beat him to within an inch of his life, somehow exorcising their rage in the process, and then just wandering off. Friedrich gives us a fake-out then, with Dune supposedly dying, only to be revealed to have survived on the next page. Ohh, the suspense? Apparently the battering he suffered somehow removed his powers, and the League and the law just kind of let him wander off to pursue his political career, despite having kidnapped hundreds of people with his hypnotic voice. Man, the authorities in Generictown sure are forgiving!

So, this is quite a comic. “Touch-feely Friedrich” is writing in his usual style, so the melodrama is cranked up, especially in his narration. Despite that, the tale is full of fascinating elements, as Friedrich stretches and strains for as much relevance as he can cram into the pages. In fact, it’s over-full, positively stuffed with different concepts, all fighting for space. We start with a returning Vietnam veteran, something rare enough in comics of this era, but even more so, Friedrich includes a nod to the difficulties such soldiers faced when coming home, the lack of opportunity and cultural hostility that greeted them. Larry Hama and other (better) writers would later deal with these themes more successfully in the 80s, when the events weren’t quite so present and time, perhaps, allowed for greater clarity and perspective.

Nonetheless, this is a really interesting moment, something that we have not seen very often in this era. In general, it seems DC books were largely ignoring the war and its consequences at this point. Yet, it isn’t just the plight of the veterans that fills the pages of this issue, as we also have other social problems providing background for the ill-defined unrest of the youth, the rage and disaffection which were still reverberating through the culture. Interestingly, there’s no mention of the anti-war movement, which would have been a natural fit for Johnny’s origins and a focus for the otherwise directionless anger of the kids in this story. Friedrich introduces the issue of returning veterans, and then he immediately moves on from it.

That is indicative of one of the major problems with this issue, as it’s a rather jumbled and discordant mix of different elements. As the plot develops, none of the interesting components of Johnny’s backstory actually have any impact on the direction of the story, other than his power and the fact that he was a musician. His military background, his inability to find a job (which is, itself, immediately undercut by the fact that we jump to him as a famous rock star), or his involvement in a neighborhood gang. None of these facets of his origin seem to actually color who he becomes or the choices he makes in the end. We’re given an intriguing hint that he was twisted by his experience in Vietnam, having become inured to violence, but though he displays a willingness to hurt the Leaguers, we don’t really see that come into play, not even in his moment of crisis and self-sacrifice. That’s disappointing because there is a ton of potential in this story’s setup. Speaking of his grand gesture, that also feels a little underwhelming, as it just feels unnecessary. Why does he have to turn their rage against himself? Why does that free them? Because plot? To make matters worse, our heroes are wholly unimpressive throughout. After all, they really don’t do much, other than occasionally beat up some kids, and or get their heads handed to them by random civilians.

Interestingly, the popular and influential, though troubled Johnny Dune, seems to be based on Jimi Hendrix to some degree, especially in the flashy style of clothes he wears throughout the adventure. Friedrich mentions Hendrix by name in his narration, and the real-life star himself had died recently, in 1970. Interestingly, Hendrix himself had been in the army, though he was discharged before seeing active service.

On the art front, this issue is solid, but not exceptional. There are definitely some of those stiff and awkward poses that characterize Dillin’s work on the book, he also does some great storytelling, bringing a lot of personality to Johnny, and giving us some nice moments throughout. All-in-all, this comic is more interesting in premise than in practice. It’s a fairly underwhelming story that can’t quite seem to decide what it’s doing. It’s still an engaging read, and it is fun to see an obvious Jimi Hendrix proxy captivating the DC Universe. I’ll give this one 3 Minutemen, as it more or less breaks even.

P.S.: Another fascinating feature of this issue is that its letter column contains correspondence from not one, but two future comics professionals! That’s right, we’ve got letters from both Mark Gruenwald and future DC Answer Man, Bob Rozakis, which is pretty cool! As you’ll see, they had rather different opinions about the work DC in general, and Friedrich in particular, were doing. I suppose that’s why Gruenwald ended up working for Marvel! However, I have to say, I think the young curmudgeon has some pretty good points in his letter, especially about the disappointing lack of supervillains in these pages. I’m curious if his math is right. It sounds pretty accurate, and we certainly have seen more than our share of alien menaces in this book since we’ve started this project, haven’t we?


Mr. Miracle #5


“Murder Machine!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Mike Royer
Editor: Jack Kirby

“Young Scott Free”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Mike Royer

Boy Commandos: “The Invasion of America”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler/Inker: Joe Simon

Well, if our Justice League story this month is a bit of a disappointment, the wonderful madness of Kirby’s Fourth World can make it up to us. In this issue, the King treats us to another delightful outing for the world’s only super-escape artist. It has a pretty good cover, continuing the pattern of our hapless hero being held helpless while being threatened by wonderfully exaggerated perils. The dangerous device isn’t as creative and outre as some of the previous entries, but I love the ridiculous variety of menaces it includes. There’s a missile labelled A-Bomb, as if you would need anything other than that, as well as a knife, an axe, and a flamethrower, which is helpfully labelled for our convenience. It’s entertainingly silly and excessive. As an added bonus, this cover is a pretty honest depiction of the devilish threat that awaits our hero within.

Our adventure begins with Big Barda, in her rather skimpy attire from the end of the last issue, performing her daily exercises to the delight of a group of workmen who have come to deliver a cannon for Scott Free’s act. In a fun and honestly funny scene, she puts all of the admiring apes to shame as she casually rips the massive cannon free from its lashings and tots it away on her shoulder. Kirby’s narration in this section, and really throughout the issue, is a bit weird and on the nose: “See Big Barda! See how she exercises! Big Barda is tough! Big Barda is incredibly strong! Big Barda comes from Apokolips!” Has he suddenly turned into Dr. Seuss? Despite that, the dialog for this opening scene is entertaining and natural….unfortunately, that doesn’t really last.

Yet, while Barda is making the menfolk feel inferior, we are introduced to Vermin Vundabar, the pint-sized Pinochet, who we learn has modeled his appearance and attitude after the rigorous military discipline and efficiency of the Prussian army of the 19th century. He’s been sent to Earth by Granny Goodness to kill Scott, and with the help of one of his henchmen, he’s testing a death trap. In a nicely effective scene, the trap backfires, injuring his minion, all while Vundabar coldly looks on. Then, he casually executes the fellow for having failed him! It’s a very effective introduction to the character, and Kirby puts a ton of personality into the little dictator in every panel.

Meanwhile, Scott and Oberon are trying out their newest act, which involves Mr. Miracle being strapped to a cannon as it fires! Man, ‘ol Scott doesn’t do things by half measures, doe she? But as they are occupied with their preparations, Barda is ambushed by some of Vundabar’s troops, and though she gives a good account of herself, she’s captured. Fortunately, Mr. Miracle is able to escape his bonds before he gets bisected by a cannonball, and he sets out to rescue the captured Female Fury.

Arriving at Vundabar’s headquarters, the heroic Houdini is greeted by a video of his antagonist before being trapped in a “titanium coffer” and locked into place on a conveyor belt of death! The coffer is then subjected to a host of horrible attacks, including battering, blasting, zapping, and finally…melting! Then, in a great moment, as Vundabar and his lackeys laugh and gloat about having caught and killed the world’s greatest escape artist, who should show up behind them but Mr. Miracle himself!

It’s a fun reveal, and he shares with them (and us) how he escaped by using his boot jets to cut through the floor and burrowed underground, which is a fairly satisfying explanation. Kirby specifically tells us that Vundabar’s cameras were focused on the front of the trap, so they didn’t pick up the hole in the conveyor belt. In another entertaining touch, while the gathered goons question him, Scott uses those same boot lasers to literally cut the floor out from under them. I’m not quite sure how that worked without them noticing, but it is a fun moment, so I’ll just roll with it. Our tale ends with Scott scooping up the weakened Barda and the pair flying off into the sunset.

This is an entertaining and thoroughly enjoyable issue. Kirby’s plotting is fun and action-packed, though his dialog and especially his narration is just plain odd in places. This is particularly noticeable in some of the unnecessarily vague and unclear descriptions of Apokolips. Despite that, there are moments of genuine humor and charm, and Kirby really seems to have a good sense of his characters. Vundabar is introduced well and given plenty of unique color and a strong personality. I love the way he doesn’t even bat an eye as his henchman literally explodes behind him. Of course, the premise is pretty wacky, but it works in the wild world of comics. Why would a New God from Apokolips model himself after Prussians from Earth? Because Earth is the center of the universe, apparently! I suppose since Darkseid is convinced that humans have the Anti-life Equation, it would make sense for his forces to turn their attention to our little orb.

Anyway, the central threat of the issue is visually interesting and exciting, and Scott’s escape is relatively satisfying. Kirby’s art is great and energetic throughout, but he also does an excellent job of capturing the emotion and personality of his characters, like Scott’s fear for Oberon while the hero himself is strapped to the cannon. I think we’re seeing the benefits of having a better inker. At any rate, I’ll give this enjoyable outing 4 Minutemen. As much fun as it is, it’s good, not great, with enough little flaws to keep it from a higher score.

P.S.: This issue had an odd little moment that confused and intrigued me, and I can’t quite decide how I feel about it. When Scott confronts Vundabar at the end, the villain accuses the hero of ‘cheating’ and using a technological trick to escape his trap. Mr. Miracle replies that “even in the ‘crunch’ I play it fair — and you know it!” So, this implies that Scott has access to technology and powers that he refuses to use out of some sense of fair play…when the forces of a personification of pure evil are trying to kill him… I find this simultaneously utterly stupid and tremendously entertaining. I love the idea of a hero who is having a good time with his adventures, perhaps who even pushes himself to excel by giving himself challenges within his adventure, like the cosmic race between Flash and Superman from World’s Finest. However, while I could absolutely see Mr. Miracle having such an attitude, I don’t know that it really makes sense for it to be applied to his conflict with Darkseid’s minions. After all, they represent a hellish reality for him, not merely a threat to life and limb. Either way, I’m intrigued by this element and curious if Kirby will develop it further.


The Phantom Stranger #16


“Image in Wax”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler/Inker: Jim Aparo
Letterer: Jim Aparo
Editor: Joe Orlando

Cover Artist: Neal Adams

Mark Merlin: “Threat of the Horrible Hex”
Writer: Arnold Drake
Penciler/Inker: Mort Meskin

Doctor 13: “And the Corpse Cried, ‘Murder!'”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler/Inker: Tony DeZuniga

In this month’s Phantom Stranger yarn we find an interesting if overstuffed tale of mystery and magic. All of that lies beneath a cover which is a very mixed bag. The background of wax figures is really excellent and striking, with the Phantom Stranger unobtrusively included in their number, his signature shadow stretching menacingly above. Yet, the central image of the old man in the wheelchair is rendered a little comical by the girl’s apparent terror, despite the monstrous hands reaching from ‘off-screen.’ It’s only half successful, I’d say, as the crippled figure of the old codger doesn’t really fit in with the heavy atmosphere of the rest of the piece.

Within, the oppressive feel of the cover is replicated in a dark and misty night, as a pair of punks tries to break into, of all things, a wax museum. Unfortunately for them, they are interrupted in the act by an apparently frail and helpless old man, and one scream later, they have been transformed into wax statues! This sequence was actually a bit confusing. Before we see the reveal of their fate, the old man, Tallow, dispatches two other shadowy figures to “find the girl!” On my first read, I naturally assumed that those were the former felons.

The next day finds a crowd attending the grand opening of the museum, which has a focus on the occult. Viewing the “Hall of Wizards” with the rest of the patrons is a certain Stranger who senses evil in the old house. Intrigued? Well, if so, too bad, because it’s going to be a quite a while before we follow up on that! Instead, that night, two men attack a woman on a deserted street, only to be interrupted by the Phantom Stranger, whose dialog has suddenly been turned up to 11 on the dramatic scale. I can’t quite decide if lines like “the powers of truth are a beacon in the darkness, far stronger than the shadows they dispel!” are cool or corny. Either way, after saving the girl, our mystery man discovers that she has lost her memory. After she is brought to a place of refuge and left with a promise of protection, she dreams strange and vivid dreams!

Falling through a very Aparo dream-scape reminiscent of some of the last of his Aquaman issues, she finds herself in a fantastic and ancient setting, where she is greeted as “Queen Dalia.” As she watches, the chief priest of this outlandish place declares that the stars declare that they, the wizards of their people, must go into hiding or be destroyed. Their only hope is a spell called “The Deathless Sleep” which will render them “as statues–waxen soulless parodies of life.” Do you see the connection? Well, hang on; it gets stranger! The chief priest, Tallow (!), declares that he will watch over their sleeping fellows, keeping himself alive by absorbing life forces from those that slumber. Yet, Dalia refuses to join him, not wanting to give up her life, and then she is suddenly rescued by the Phantom Stranger, who pulls her through the psychedelic dream space and back to the land of the waking in a cool sequence.

Think you’ve got a handle on the story? Well, hold on to your hat, because despite the fact that we’ve already got a haunted wax museum, an amnesiac girl, and a mysterious ancient civilization, Wein isn’t done tossing in elements just yet! After the nightmare, the Spectral Sleuth and his lovely charge go for a walk to clear her head, only to encounter an ardent and anxious young man named Ernie Drapper, who claims to be her fiance. He goes from distressed to dangerous at the drop of a hat, attacking the Phantom Stranger when the mysterious man tries to explain the situation. While they struggle, they are struck by a burst of dark energy, and when they recover, they discover the girl has been taken! A very tolerant and forgiving Stranger shrugs off Drapper’s attempt to murder him and takes the unstable fellow in search of his forgetful fiance.

Their search takes them to the wax museum, of course, where they are captured by wax figures come to life and brought before Tallow, who is indeed the long-lived chief priest from Dalia’s dream. We discover that she had escaped from her people, having stolen life force from another (!), and they have been seeking to recapture her. At this explanation, Drapper once more displays his disturbingly short temper and penchant for violence, breaking free and trying to burn the whole place down while they’re all still inside it. They rescue Dalia from the flames, but her respite proves short lived, as she melts away like wax once outside, confessing that she was one of these mysterious wizards in hiding, but that she did truly love him. The Phantom Stranger offers the grieving Drapper the rather unhelpful thought that he still has his memories, and then wanders off into the night, leaving the unstable young man weeping over his love’s smoldering remains.

Ooookay…..so, did you follow all that? If you’ve got questions, you’re not alone! I am left a bit befuddled. She tells us that her amnesia was self-induced, but she also says that she lied to Ernie…so….how much was the lie? Did she actually not know what she was, or was she only lying at the end when she said Tallow’s tale wasn’t true? I’m guessing it’s the latter, but this is all a bit confusing. This story is, like many of Wein’s during this run, just plain overstuffed with ideas. There is just too much going on here, and while it isn’t as incongruous and messy as some of Kanigher’s efforts on the book, it does definitely feel hurried and incomplete. We’ve got a lost society hidden in plain sight, which is an interesting idea, but we learn almost nothing about them, their culture, their origins, their objectives, or their motivations, other than preserving their people. We have the girl with amnesia and the mystery of her identity, but although we learn that she was part of this group, we learn almost nothing else about her. What was she doing living as a human? How long had she been on the run? She stole life force to make her escape; did she kill someone to do that? There’s a ton that could be done with these ideas, but Wein just rushes right through them, not taking any time to explore or develop any of these interesting elements. This should have been at least two issues, I’d say, with one perhaps unraveling the enigma of the girl’s identity, ending with the discovery that there was more to the mystery than meets the eye and leading in to the whole ‘secret wizard colony’ thing. Even in comics, that needs a bit more air to breathe.

The art, of course, is fantastic and atmospheric. Aparo creates moody, menacing mystery, mind-bending visions, and even great quiet moments with gusto and aplomb. He also includes some fun Easter eggs in the wax museum. Among the famed figures gathered in that macabre manse, sharp-eyed readers might spot the creepy Cain of House of Mystery fame, as well as Sargon the Sorcerer and, perhaps, the Time Trapper (though his costume is so nondescript, it could just be a generic robbed figure). I wonder if the fellow in colonial garb is someone too, but if so, I can’t place him. His Stranger looks particularly great, always in motion and wreathed in shadow, a striking, dynamic figure in any scene. It’s always interesting to me when this clearly supernatural entity suddenly seems human, like when the stunned Stranger is sprawled on the sidewalk, his hat knocked off his head. It further muddies the waters with just who or what he is. At any rate, the lovely art helps to elevate the rather flawed story, and the end result is a fun, though somewhat confusing and overfull tale that leaves you wishing Wein had picked just one element on which to focus. Still, though the individual components of the story are underdeveloped, Wein does give us a complete tale with a full emotional arc, however rushed. I’ll give it an average 3 Minutemen.


“And the Corpse Cried ‘Murder'”


Our backup is once again a tale of Dr. Thirteen, the Ghost-Breaker (which is, to be fair, an awesome nom de guerre). It begins with a couple on a mountain road witnessing the fiery crash of a car in an apparent suicide. Yet, later on, the good doctor receives an unexpected an unusual visitor in his study, a ghostly apparition who claims to be the spirit of a murdered man named Paul Williams. The interloper, who proves to be actually incorporeal, begs Dr. Thirteen to find his killer, and the intrigued investigator agrees, though he plans to expose the poltergeist as a plot!

He pays a visit to the “ghost’s” widow, who suggests that a disgruntled former employee of her husband, Ross Curran, might have hated him enough to kill him. Heading to the suspect’s house, the skeptical sleuth arrives in time to see the electrical technician apparently commit suicide after admitting that he killed his former boss. Yet, when the doctor examines the body, he finds that it is as cold as ice, as if it had been dead for hours. He also finds a thin film of dust over everything in the room, theorizing that there is a similar residue in his office. Suspecting that he’s being set up as a sucker, the Ghost-Breaker sets out to live up to his nickname.

Calling Mrs. Williams, he implies that he’s uncovered new evidence, and a while later, the supposedly spectral Paul Williams shows up, very much corporeal, and armed to boot! He admits that he and his wife faked his death, sending a derelict to a fiery fate in his place, and framing Curran for his murder, with the electrical wizard’s unwitting aid. Just as the murderer prepares to add another death to his doll, Dr. Thirteen triggers an illusion of his own, the same holographic technology that had created William’s ghostly “manifestation” and Curran’s “suicide”, images projected onto reflective particles floating in the air. William’s fires ineffectively, and the Ghost-Breaker wades in, only to lose the initiative a moment later. Just as Williams is about to kill the doubting detective, his would-be widow stumbles in, having caught one of the stray bullets he fired, leaving Dr. Thirteen to close the case in a more peaceful, if somber, fashion.

This is a really solid Dr. Thirteen tale. It’s got a good central mystery, wrapped in the appearance of a false enigma. It’s a clever twist on a familiar plot, with a private detective brought in to play unwitting patsy for a nefarious plot, providing an unimpeachable witness for a false reality. The pay-off requires science fiction technology, but for a story taking place in the DC Universe, that is pretty believable. Of course there would be realistic holograms floating around in that world. Thirteen himself is clever and resourceful, not really being taken in by the plot. In only 8 pages, Wein manages to deliver a complete and satisfying mystery, complete with a nice emotional beat at the end. DeZuniga’s art is pretty solid throughout, achieving some really nice effects with some of the holographic sequences. I’ll give this fine backup 3.5 Minutemen. It’s a good and intriguing read, and unlike the title tale, in this one, Wein makes excellent use of his limited space.


And that will do it for this delayed dose of Bronze Age brilliance! We’ve got a solid set of stories, all of them making for at least decent reads, and with a very diverse set of styles. I hope that y’all found them as interesting as I did, and that you’ll join me again (hopefully soon!) for another ed

Into the Bronze Age: December 1971 (Part 1)

Happy New Year! I imagine we’re all very happy to greet 2021. I know that I’ve never been quite so happy to say goodbye to year, at least! And what better way to start the new year than with Bronze Age comics? Well folks, welcome back to a new edition of Into the Bronze Age! I’m excited to get into the December cover-dated books of 1971. Glancing at the cover gallery, it looks like we’ve got some fun stories in store of us! In fact, we’ve got a pretty darn good set of comics in this batch. There are some fun surprises and some real winners in this set. So, without further ado, let’s get started with what was going on in the world in December of 1971!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


This month in history:

  • The Cambodian Civil War intensifies, with conflicts between government forces and Khmer Rouge rebels.
  • Soviet space probe Mars 3 is first to soft land on Mars
  • Abu Dhabi, Ajman, Dubai, Fujeira, Sharjah, and Umm ak Qiwain form United Arab Emirates and declare independence from the UK
  • President Nixon commutes Jimmy Hoffa’s jail term
  • The Indo-Pakistani War of 1971 begins after Pakistani strikes in Northern India, which connected to the Bangladesh Liberation War
  • West German Chancellor Willy Brandt receives the Nobel Peace Prize
  • Multiple bombings and clashes in Ireland that claim several lives, including several IRA members being caught in the blasts of their own bombs
  • The Pakistani Army executes over 1,000 people in a genocidal ethnic and ideological purge of East Pakistan
  • India and Bangladesh win their wars, and Bangladesh achieves independence
  • Operation PUSH (People United to Save Humanity) formed by Jesse Jackson
  • USA and Russia continue nuclear tests
  • Important films released this month included the horrifying A Clockwork Orange, which says something about the zeitgeist of the age, though I hesitate to say precisely what

The Troubles in Ireland escalate a great deal this month, with bombing after bombing and violence abounding. What a terrifying time that must have been for those who lived through it, never knowing if a simple visit to a pub might end in injury or death. On a more positive note, Bangladesh won its independence from Pakistan this month, thanks in part to the support of India. In the US, things seem to have been fairly quiet as the nation approached Christmas. I wonder what that was like!

This month’s top song is the funky “Family Affair” by Sly and the Family Stone, which is apparently beloved but didn’t really grab me.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #407
  • Adventure Comics #413
  • Batman #237
  • Detective Comics #418
  • The Flash #211
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #87
  • Justice League of America #95
  • Mr. Miracle #5
  • Phantom Strange #16
  • Superboy #180
  • Superman #246 (#245 was all reprints)
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #117
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #144
  • Teen Titans #36
  • World’s Finest #208

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Action Comics #407


Executive Editor: Carmine Infantino
Cover Artists: Curt Swan and Murphy Anderson

Superman: “The Fiend in the Fortress of Solitude”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Curt Swan
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Editor: Murray Boltinoff

Atom: “The Challenge of the Expanding World (II)”
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler and Inker: Alex Toth
Editor: Murray Boltinoff

Superman: “The Planet of Prey!”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Curt Swan
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Editor: Murray Boltinoff

We begin the month with a rather typical Superman yarn, replete with secret identity drama and over the top super-feats, though Bates manages to make it a readable enough tale out of these conventional ingredients. The cover is pretty much faithful to what we find inside, though the device of having Supes spying the characters outside the fortress and the attendant rock wall makes it a bit muddy. It’s a solid if unremarkable cover, which is fitting for the story within.

The adventure begins with a small plane in peril, as its pilot struggles to bring it in for an emergency landing in the frozen north. In fact, as it noses in for a crash landing, we discover that the misplaced plane has actually touched down at the foot of the Fortress of Solitude! Fortunately for the pilot, Superman happens to be at home and rushes the fellow to an Alaskan hospital (one imagines Iceland would be closer to the North Pole). However, it turns out that this seemingly innocent airman is actually a notorious criminal the Metropolis Marvel once put away. The hero remembers his face, but too late, as the scofflaw had already stolen a plane and escaped.

Unbeknownst to Superman, the flying fugitive, Michael “King” Andrews has gotten away with the knowledge of the location of the Fortress of Solitude, and he proceeds to plot to rob the place as his revenge, recruiting his son, Mike Jr., who is living at a reform school. In a relatively effective bit of characterization, we discover that the boy is actually starting to turn his life around, enjoying the trust he’s earned at the school, but he feels like he can’t let his father down. Of course, the kid’s possible redemption doesn’t seem to have sunk in all that well, as he happily kidnaps Clark Kent at gunpoint for his father. I guess his qualms aren’t all that serious after all. Kent, playing possum to protect his secret identity and thus establishing the pattern for this story, is brought to an abandoned airfield, where they meet the third member of this criminal conspiracy, a mysterious electronics expert that Mr. Mild-Mannered realizes is wearing a disguise!

The quartet fly to the Fortress of Solitude, with “King” putting all the others to sleep, even his own son, remarking that a criminal can’t trust anyone. Once there, the electronics expert, Slesar, disables Superman’s security, and they break in (somehow without the gigantic key). Apparently the man-sized keyhole passes entirely through the door, which rather seems to defeat the purpose! Once inside, they lock Clark up and leave the boy to guard him, but a series of emergencies popping up around the globe force the undercover hero to create various distractions, allowing him to slip out and save the world, flying all the way around the globe, putting out fires and saving submarines (poaching in Aquaman’s domain there!), all in a matter of seconds, which is just plain ridiculous.

The power level of the Silver Age Superman certainly seems to be back to its full extent, and it is just plot-breaking. If the Man of Steel can zoom around the entire Earth and carry out various incredibly complex tasks, all in under ten seconds, than he certainly could have just zoomed away and captured the intruders without giving away his identity. This kind of thing rather bothers me. I’m fine with Superman using his super speed to zoom across a room and back faster than the eye can see, but when he does that on a planetary scale, it’s just too much!

Anyway, overblown power levels aside, the adventure comes to a head when “King” tells his son, worried about an apparently trapped Clark Kent, that he was just going to kill the reporter anyway, as ruthlessness is also required of a successful crook, a sentiment that “Slesar” shares, unfortunately for his partners in perfidy. The electronics expert reveals himself to be…Lex Luthor! It isn’t all that much of a surprise, but the revelation is still fun, and Luthor is truly nasty here, as he’s planted a bomb in the Fortress and plans on killing both the Andrews pair in cold blood to keep them from warning the Man of Tomorrow! “King” isn’t one to take such things meekly, however, and the two shoot it out, with Luthor”s lethal laser laying his foe low. That gives us another on-panel murder! The Comics Code Authority folks must have been asleep at the switch.

Just then, Superman returns and captures his nemesis (with a tap!), disposes of the bomb, and comforts the young Mike, who now sees the error of his ways and wants to avoid his father’s fate. Interestingly, the tale ends with the Action Ace asking Luthor if he truly hated him enough to sacrifice his own life to kill him, and Luthor’s sullen reply, “You know the answer to that, Superman” shows a surprisingly vicious portrayal of the character, which is striking.

Well, this was a solid, if unremarkable, story. The plot was pretty simple, with the secret identity antics, though fun to see thanks to Curt Swan’s lovely pencils, not terribly interesting to read. Yet, the different unique elements help it to stay entertaining. The understated arc of the young hoodlum, Mike Jr., and his discovery of his rotten father’s true character leading to his transformation is actually quite effective. Bates does a lot with those characters with very little “screen time”. Luthor’s plot and his cold ruthlessness are also an interesting addition, really marking him as an effective and threatening villain. It helps that he straight-up kills “King”, which is still a rarity in this era. Swan’s art is good throughout, and Superman’s side trips are quite striking. The ultimate result is a fine read that I enjoyed better than I expected. I’ll give it 3.5 Minutemen, as it is a little above average thanks to the subplots.


The Planet of Prey


This month’s backup is a lot more creative than our headline tale, resulting in a clever and interesting little sci-fi superhero adventure. It begins with the Action Ace returning home from a mission in space when he encounters a strange planetoid that veers into his path. When he approaches it, he finds himself besieged by the telepathic ‘squawking’ of a flock of alien avians. They swarm about the Man of Steel, but he easily and relatively gently dispatches them. Heading down to the surface, he discovers that the seemingly barren world has suddenly transformed into a miniature copy of Krypton, complete with micro-sized versions of his birth parents, Jor-El and Lara! They beckon him down, but Kal-El realizes they obviously can’t be his parents and heads back into orbit, feeling strangely drained from the effort.

And this brings me to the small but crucial detail that really made me appreciate this yarn. Bates throws something strange and intriguing at his hero, but he still has Superman behave like a rational, intelligent person rather than a gullible idiot. In the typical version of this type of plot, characters who have seen illusions masquerading as loved ones hundreds of times seem to instantly and foolishly believe the evidence of their eyes and ignore the impossibility of the situation, doing intensely stupid things as a result. I really enjoyed that Bates didn’t go the way I expected when I saw fun-sized Jor-El. Instead, our Kryptonian traveler is confused and suspicious, which is the rational response to such a sight, and I appreciate that type of logical consistency.

What gorgeous work Swan did on the faces of Kal’s parents! He really packed a lot of personality into these two.

Anyway, once back in space, the Metropolis Marvel looks down to see that the world has now turned into a scale version of the Earth, complete with a tiny crumbling Metropolis and bite-sized Jimmy and Lois trapped within. Even then Superman doesn’t just rush in like a moron, but perplexed, he lands nearby, and then the trap springs! The illusion vanishes and the very soil seems to reach out to swallow him as the gravitic pull of the world suddenly increases a thousandfold!

In another clever moment, the Man of Steel tries to emulate the Fastest Man Alive, trying out his friend The Flash’s vibrating trick to escape. It isn’t enough, but just then he begins to hear telepathic messages of hope, and the alien birds from the beginning of the story arrive and break him free. They explain that he is now vibrating at their wavelength, enabling them to communicate with him. They tried to warn him off earlier, but he thought it was an attack. Apparently they live in a symbiotic relationship with this strange, predatory planetoid, which uses psychic illusions to lure in unwary spacefarers in order to consume them. Superman wonders why they would deprive themselves of sustenance, but surprisingly, they inform him that it was a purely mercenary action, as they have learned that the world becomes unhealthy for them when it consumes sentient life!

What a fun, creative, and unusual story! I thoroughly enjoyed reading it. I love that Bates told a story that maintained psychological realism and logical consistency, creating actual. reasonable motivations for his protagonist instead of having things just happen ‘because of plot.’ Even better, the central concept, although not completely unique, is interesting, and he really does keep you guessing as the adventure unfolds. I also love that last touch, that the alien creatures saved our hero, not because of altruistic motivations, but simply out of self-preservation! It’s a simple story, but it’s quite well crafted with a lot of small but significant creative touches. The art, of course, is lovely, and Swan gets to stretch his creative muscles with the alien creatures, doing a good job of rendering the different scales of his hero and the illusions. I’ll give this brief but high quality little outing 4.5 Minutemen!


Adventure Comics #413


Supergirl: “The Walking Bombs!”
Writer: John Albano
Penciler: Art Saaf
Inker: Bob Oksner
Letterer: Ben Oda
Editors: Joe Orlando and Mark Hanerfeld
Cover Artist: Bob Oksner

Hawkman: “Earth’s Impossible Day!”
Writer: Gardner Fox
Penciler/Inker: Joe Kubert
Letterer: Gaspar Saladino
Editor: Julius Schwartz

Zatanna: “Zatanna the Magician!”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler/Inker: Gray Morrow
Editor: Joe Orlando

Robotman: “The Robot Ghost!”
Penciler/Inker: Frank Bolle
Editor: Whitney Ellsworth

Our Adventure Comics headline tale this month is an odd collection of elements that don’t quite fit together. It has some really charming touches, though, and Albano manages to give this Supergirl adventure some unique personality for the Maid of Might. All of this lies underneath a striking but strange cover. Our central image is pretty arresting, but it also doesn’t make a whole lot of sense. We’ve got a four-armed robotic walking bomb dressed up in a suit, apparently robbing a bank. If you were to take way the extra appendages, this would work reasonably well, capturing a moment of shocking discovery. However, if you think about the image for a minute, it make so no real sense. If you’re trying to pass off your android as a person, why in the world would you give him an extra set of arms? Other than that detail, which continues to bother me in the story itself, it is a nice-looking cover, which communicates the peril reasonably effectively.

The story begins with Linda Danvers rushing through town on some vital errand…specifically, she’s trying to get to a sale at a department store! In a fun detail, she thinks to herself that she can’t use her super speed to beat the rush because it wouldn’t be fair to the other shoppers. We join the disguised Girl of Steel as she tries on some different outfits, and the fashion themes of this book continue as Art Saaf indulges his inner fashion designer. Unfortunately, our young heroine indulges in a bit too much bargain hunting and has to head to the bank, only to discover that the place is being robbed! What’s more, the thief is a four-armed robot of all things! The Girl of Tomorrow ducks into a convenient alley and begins to change, only to discover that she’s got an audience in the form of a resident bum, who is quite happy to extend her hospitality. She is in too much of a hurry to find a handy telephone booth like her cousin, so she shoves the voyeur’s hat down over his eyes and completes her transformation into Supergirl. This whole exchange cracked me up. This is a hilarious and fun little scene that adds a sense of whimsy to the tale.

Once inside the bank, the Maid of Might is confronted with the towering android, who announces that if she interferes with his heist, he will blow the surrounding city blocks to smithereens! Just then, a young boy attacks the bank-robbing bot for stealing his mother’s deposit, and when the machine is about to strike the kid, it suddenly hesitates, and instead returns the money. How odd! Having no real choice, Supergirl lets the android escape in a flying sphere. She trails the fleeing felon to a secret underground lab, smashing in to find a turtleneck-wearing mad scientist who traps her in an electrical cage. The mastermind warns the Girl of Steel that if she breaks out, it will set off bombs in San Fransisco! As an aside, I hate it when writers mix real American cities with the usual DC geography. It blurs the lines of the setting, in my mind.

At any rate, our villain starts to monologue, and it is at this point that the major discordant note of the story enters the equation. The machine-making mad scientist tells his superheroic guest his tale of woe. His name is Robert Meekly, and he was a banker whose son suffered an accident that left him blind. The boy’s only hope was an operation that would cost $25,000, an astronomical amount for his hapless father. Meekly tries everything to raise the money, but his last hope, the president of his bank, refuses his loan, despite the fact that he’s served faithfully for 15 years. So, the desperate father does what he has to do and steals the money, going to prison as a result, but not before he gets his son the operation. To make things worse, while he was imprisoned, his wife took his son and disappeared.

Okay, now just hold on a minute…apparently our mad scientist learned robot building and bomb making…while working in a bank? Really? I know that super-science is easily accessible in the DC Universe, but come on! This is just ridiculous! Well, balmy bona-fides aside, the unfortunately named Meekly has come to deserve a less harmless name, as he now plans to get his revenge by robbing and blowing up banks across the country. He leaves our hobbled heroine to carry out his sinister scheme, and she prepares to escape, only to discover that her on-again-off-again powers are conveniently off again. Despite this limitation, the resourceful Supergirl manages to short out the electrical cage with a hair pin, which is another fun touch.

She interrupts Meekly’s machinations, only for him to try to strangle the powerless powerhouse! Even without powers, Linda is no pushover, and she breaks free. Then her powers return just as conveniently, and she smashes through the robotic roughnecks, but not before the mad Meekly manages to release some of his death machines, targeting two banks. The Maid of Might tells the irate inventor that his son is actually the teller at one of those banks! Meekly suddenly realizes his terrible mistake and agrees to help Supergirl stop the walking bombs. They split up, and he does indeed manage to capture his robotic bomber, but it blows up before he can dismantle it. While searching the wreckage, the authorities find the medal that Meekly was constantly playing with, and they realize that it was a little league award for his son.

Well, on that cheerful note, our tale ends, and we find ourselves with a discordant mixture of elements that just don’t really add up to a coherent whole. We’ve got a charming, off-beat opening, a tragic origin for our villain that doesn’t match his eventual M.O. at all, and then that downbeat ending. The banker-turned-supervillain mad scientist just doesn’t make any sense, but the basic plot is pretty straight-forward and works reasonably well. I find the little details of Supergirl’s shopping spree and changing challenges quite charming, and Albano seems to have a solid handle on her characterization. It seems that some of the themes that we’ve seen in this run of the series are continuing, with an ongoing emphasis on fashion and a uniquely feminine touch to some of the plots. That’s interesting, and I still find myself wondering just how much of the book’s contemporary audience was female and how well this focus worked. Despite those positive elements, I am already getting tired of the disappearing superpowers gimmick. I’d like to see more made of this or it wrapped up already. On the art front, Saaf’s pencils are quite pretty throughout, and he injects a ton of personality into his characters. I suppose this more or less all evens out, and I’ll give the whole kit and caboodle an average 3 Minutemen.


Zatanna the Magician


The highlight of the book and, quite possibly, the month, is this brief backup tale with Zatanna. It’s great fun, and boy is it gorgeous with Gray Morrow doing the art chores! It begins with our heroine’s retired father, Zatarra, researching “the realm of the supernatural” when he is ambushed by some spectral spooks who creep out of the woodwork in his study. Meanwhile, the Maid of Magic herself is in the basement talking to her manager, Jeff, trying to convince him that she should use legerdemain instead of her actual magical powers in her stage show. In a fun little sequence, Zatanna explains that, while real magic is very easy for her, almost like cheating, illusion takes skill and practice.

The pair head upstairs to get some coffee, only to be ambushed by her mind-controlled father, who banishes them into another dimension! The Mistress of Mysticism finds her powers outclassed and unable to transport them back, so they go in search of a natural “dimensional juncture” or meeting place between dimensions. She whips up a flying carpet, and away they go. Unfortunately, they suddenly find themselves under fire by a gang of barbarians. They land, and Zatanna whips up a sword and shield for Jeff, who objects that he doesn’t know how to use them. In a great sequence, the pair manage to hold their own for a few minutes but eventually get overwhelmed. Our tale ends with both dimensional exiles unconscious and in the hands of the barbarians, who remark that “the Master” will be pleased with them.

This is a great little story, just full of interest and color. It gives us an intriguing, all-too brief glimpse of the daily life of the magical pair and sets up an equally intriguing adventure, with Zatanna swept away into strange environs by her bewitched father. There’s some good action, some creative designs, and some nice character touches, with some good banter between The Maid of Magic and her manager, all packed into only 7 pages. Also, I’m tickled that the manager apparently gets his wardrobe from the same place as the ever-fashionable Geoff from Supergirl’s supporting cast, as he is dressed in the height of groovy 70s fashion. Of course, bringing all of this to life in inimitable style is Gray Morrow, who’s work is just plain lovely, while also being dynamic and full of energy. There’s never a panel where the characters are simply still and static; someone is always moving or interacting, with hair waving about or clothing in motion. It’s pretty impressive. The whole makes for a great story, and the only real problem with it is that there should be more of it, which is a great problem to have! I’ll give this delightful little adventure 4.5 Minutemen. I feel like Zatanna is a character with a lot of potential, but I’ve never really read a solo story with her, so I am quite looking forward to seeing more of her adventures!


Batman #237


Executive Editor: Julius Schwartz
Cover Artists: Neal Adams and Gaspar Saladino

“Night of the Reaper!”
Writers: Dennis O’Neil, Bernie Wrightson, Harlan Ellison
Penciler: Neal Adams
Inker: Dick Giordano
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Julius Schwartz

“The Screaming House”
Writer: Bill Finger
Pencilers: Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson
Inker: Bob Kane
Letterer: Jerry Robinson
Editor: Vincent Sullivan

Our Batman issue this month is, as usual, a cut above the average stories we’re seeing. It’s a pretty cool tale, with a fun setting and a surprising subject, though it has a bit of a tone problem, bouncing between spooky and funny, light hearted and heavy. We’ve got a pretty good cover, which is not much of a surprise from Neal Adams. It features a nice, menacing figure threatening Robin, creating good tension and interest, though the red background is a bit overpowering, I think.

The comic itself begins with a really striking splash page, featuring Batman pinned to a tree with a stake! How could this be? Well, it will be a little while before we get an answer, as we jump to a delightful two-page spread featuring Robin and three of his friends (who never get named, oddly enough), visiting the comic-famous Rutland Halloween Parade, which provided an opportunity for backdoor crossovers between DC and Marvel Comics in the Bronze Age. This real world phenomenon was a superhero themed event in Rutland, Vermont, which local writer and comic fan Tom Fagan, promoted in both DC and Marvel comics, featuring many attendees dressed as their favorite comic heroes, including comic book professionals. In the 70s, beginning with Avengers #83, both DC and Marvel creative teams began to use the event as a setting for unofficial crossovers between their characters. This Batman yarn is the second such and the first from DC.

Robin and his friends, who are apparently subtle cameos by comic creators (left to right, I think) Bernie Wrightson, Gerry Conway, and Alan Weiss, which is a really fun detail that I didn’t know until I started researching these “crossovers”. One of these friends, Alan, if my identification is correct, is a bit wacked-out because he’s been up for three days cramming for exams (and maybe taking stimulants more powerful than coffee!), and he’s obsessed with the floats. Also in attendance are costumed revelers dressed as such mixed Marvel and DC stars as Captain America, Hawkman, Havok, a bespectacled Aquaman, and a portly Man of Steel, among others. Unfortunately the festivities are interrupted by a fight, as three men jump a parade-goer dressed as….Robin! Dick and his buddies (minus the distracted Alan) charge over to even the odds, a concept that I always appreciate in fiction. Mr. Terrific would be proud!

Though the good Samaritans’ hearts are in the right place, they’re a bit outclassed, and soon Dick’s buddies get bashed, and he’s left to handle the situation by himself. He’s also got to do it without giving away his secret identity by fighting too well. He gets two of the toughs, but then Alan stumbles into him, giving the third an opening. Suddenly the Teen Wonder finds himself kissing pavement as the punks escape (I’m going to say that this doesn’t count as a Headblow for the Headcount, as Dick maintains consciousness). The roughed-up Robin replacement reveals that he doesn’t know what caused the attack, leading the real Robin to conclude that someone may have actually meant to target him, as the gunsels seemed like professionals. Slipping away, he dons his costume and starts to investigate, soon stumbling upon the transfixed Caped Crusader from our opening scene.

Tremblingly, the horrified hero approaches the tree, only to discover that the hanging form is not his pierced partner but a pegged party-goer in a Batman costume. As the Teen Titan tries to gather his wits, he’s attacked by the grim reaper, or at least a reasonable facsimile! Robin dodges a blow but trips on a rock and plunges over the cliff-side, striking his head on the rocks below (Man, Dick is really not coming off too well in this story, is he?). Fortunately, Batman arrives in the nick of time and pulls his imperiled partner from the drink before he drowns. The Dark Knight takes his sore sidekick to Tom Fagan’s house, where there is a Halloween party in full swing.

There Dick is treated by an aged German physicians, Dr. Gruener, who helps the Masked Manunter explain what he’s doing in Rutland. Apparently the doctor is a survivor of a concentration camp, a camp run by an escaped Nazi war criminal nicknamed “The Butcher.” They suspect that he’s hiding nearby, as the doctor having learned his former tormentor was in town. They hope that, since the Nazi was obsessed with masquerade parties, the superhero shindig of Rutland might lure him into the open. However, to complicate matters, Schloss, “The Butcher”, stole some gold from his fellow Nazis when he fled the sinking ship that was the Reich, and his former friends have found him as well and have dispatched a hit-squad to handle him.

That’s Tom Fagan in the top panel, who apparently always stayed in character during the parade

Leaving Robin to recover, Batman heads out into the party to search for his quarry, and here we get some more fun cameos. Not only do we see a rather homemade Thor costume, but we also see Spider-Man, or rather, “Webslinger Lad.” In addition to the mighty Marvelites, Denny O’Neil himself is chatting with Thor, while Len Wein, looking like Cain from House of Mystery, provides snide commentary nearby. This is another great little meta touch. However, if you notice it, it does detract a bit from the search for a Nazi war criminal. On that subject, the Dark Knight heads outside, and finds the reaper’s latest victim with the help of the still dazed and confused Alan. While continuing his search, the Caped Crusader notices a light in the tower of Fagan’s house, a light being used as a signal. The Masked Manhunter ambushes a few of the Nazis hunting his target in a sequence that is a bit cooler in premise than in practice, as Adams’ art doesn’t quite capture the action like you’d expect, but he makes up for it in the following pages. Batman hauls one of the assassins out a window and dangles him off a roof to interrogate him. The fellow confesses that they planted a bomb in the traitor’s car, which explodes, killing “The Butcher”, despite Batman’s best efforts. It’s a really rather spectacular sequence.

The Dark Knight is angry and frustrated, and when Robin tries to comfort him, he lashes out, telling his partner that the case isn’t over, as the Nazis don’t account for all of the killings. But he knows who does. The Gotham Guardian sets out on a grim business, tracking down the Reaper, who he finally confronts, calling him by name….Dr. Gruener! The Holocaust survivor acknowledges the truth of Batman’s declaration, explaining that he simply couldn’t let “The Butcher” get away without getting his revenge, revenge for his entire family who died in the camps. He reported his discovery of the Nazi to the authorities, but then he thought better of it and tried to kill anyone who he thought might get in the way of his exacting his own revenge, like the Dynamic Duo. The Masked Manhunter struggles with his sympathy for the Doctor and his quest, but he ultimately rejects the sentiment, proclaiming that no man has a right to play judge and jury by himself (which is a nice character moment and a key component of who Batman is).

The pair struggle, but their fight comes to an unexpected and tragic conclusion when Alan wanders back into the scene, still dazed and confused. He bumps into Gruener as the older man is running across a dam, prompting the desperate doctor to prepare to kill him, only to see the Star of David the young man is wearing and finally realize that he was himself becoming a monster like the one who destroyed his family. Staggering blindly backwards, the doctor falls to this doom on the ground below as Batman looks helplessly on. It’s a really well-executed moment, and Adams’ art is superb.

This is a good story, though it is a bit uneven in tone, with moments of comedy, clever cameos, horror, and tragedy all fighting for space and balance. You can certainly have comedic beats in a story that tackles serious themes (the Marvel movies have turned that into an art form), but it feels incongruous here, especially because the transitions between those moments are a little too sharp and because O’Neil is dealing with just about the heaviest of heaviest themes, the Holocaust. Once again, he deserves some credit for tackling a pretty dark and serious topic for this era of comics, and he does some good work with it, making the camp survivor, Dr. Gruener sympathetic and tragic in fairly little space. Apparently it was Harlan Ellison’s idea to write a story on that subject, which is why he gets the credit at the beginning of the issue.

On the lighter side, all of the cameos and the Rutland setting itself are really fun. I can only imagine what a thrill it was as a young fan to see Thor sharing the page with Batman, even if only as a joke. It would be several years before there would be any official crossovers between DC and Marvel, so this would have been an exciting and almost unprecedented experience. Of course, Adams’ art is quite good, moody and dynamic, really delivering on the tension and action in many scenes, but there are also a few places where his figures or poses end up looking a tad odd, which is unusual for him. All-in-all, this is a good and entertaining read, even if it doesn’t quite come together. I’ll give it a solid 4 Minutemen.


That will do it for this set of stories, and a fine set it was! I hope that y’all enjoyed my coverage as much as I enjoyed writing it! Please join me again soon for the next batch of books as we continue our voyage Into the Bronze Age!


Into the Bronze Age: November 1971 (Part 6)

Hello and welcome back my friends and readers! I hope and trust that y’all have all had a very merry Christmas and are enjoying the post celebration cheer. In any case, we have, after a two year hiatus (!), finally arrived at the end of November 1971! I’m very pleased to have gotten back to this little project, as it has always been something that I have loved. I have already been enjoying diving back into these classic comics, and even the duds have proven entertaining. Here at the end of this month we have two more tales to tell, and they are a mixed bag. I can safely say, however, that you won’t be bored reading these comics, even if one of them makes no freaking sense. So, without further ado (I feel like y’all have waited long enough as it is!), let’s continue our journey Into the Bronze Age!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #406
  • Adventure Comics #412
  • Batman #236
  • Brave and the Bold #98
  • Detective Comics #417
  • The Flash #210
  • Forever People #5
  • G.I. Combat #150
  • Justice League of America #94
  • New Gods #5
  • Superboy #179
  • Superman #244
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #116
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #143
  • World’s Finest #207

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #143


“Jimmy Olsen: Genocide Spray!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inkers: Vince Colletta and Murphy Anderson
Letterer: John Costanza
Editors: Jack Kirby and E. Nelson Bridwell

“DNA Project: The Alien Thing!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: John Costanza
Editors: Jack Kirby and E. Nelson Bridwell

“Newsboy Legion: The Rookie Takes the Rap!”
Writers: Joe Simon and Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Letterer: Howard Ferguson
Editor: Whitney Ellsworth

Okay….where to begin? So, the last issue, which we covered way back when, was crazy enough. Yet, this one really takes the cake for gonzo madness. After I finished reading, I sat staring at my comic for a few minutes, just pondering, ‘how in the world am I going to summarize this?’ Do we get an explanation for why vampires and werewolves are hanging around former NASA facilities? Sort of? We do get explanations, but they don’t make a whole lot of sense! But before we get into the madness inside, let’s take a look at this cove. We get an interesting image of ghostly figures rising from the “mini-planet” our heroes discovered at the end of the last issue. It works pretty well, and it looks fairly dynamic and spooky. The story it represents is not quite so fortunate!

We do get a really lovely two-page splash revealing the mysterious planet, Transilvane, complete with comparatively giant ‘horns’ (Can a planet be evil?) and a brace of hovering movie cameras(!). With no warning, we’ve gone from investigating a scientific laboratory to the set of a Universal monster movie, as The Man of Tomorrow finds a secret passage that opens into a chamber where the pals discovers a pair of coffins, presumably belonging to the apparently vampiric ‘Count Dragorin’ and his hairy henchman. Inside, they do find their supposedly undead antagonist, but they also find hi-tech gadgetry, and this seems to confirm Superman’s theory that these beings are actually from the mini-world, tiny creatures that use machines to grow large enough to interact on a human scale, like reverse Atoms. Just then, more of the classic movie monsters arrive, and we get a regular Monster Mash, as the Action Ace and the cub reporter fight this macabre menace, only to be struck down by a “micro-bomb” triggered by the cunning Count.

Kirby cuts us away at that point, shifting the focus to the Newsboy Legion, who we last left in an underground bunker, having discovered the gangster who killed the original Guardian, Jim Harper. The kids listen in as the unwary gunman spills his guts on the phone with his Intergang contact. Having heard enough, they jump him, planning to bring him to justice, but the torpedo turns the tables on your youthful heroes, literally, in a panel that looks more like a bomb went off than a desk was kicked over. However, his escape proves short-lived, as Intergang triggers hidden explosives in the hideout, tying up the loose end he represented and leaving the kids empty-handed. Dispirited, they eventually make their way back to the surface at last.

“ZONNKO!” You’ve got to love comic sound effects!

Meanwhile, what about the assembled cast of our extraterrestrial Adams Family and their feud with the Man of Steel? Well, they tie the Kryptonian to a torture device and attempt to force him to reveal the location of the elusive Dabney Donovan, but when Superman casually breaks free and tells his ‘captors’ that he doesn’t know where to find the missing scientist, they start talking about some kind of prophecy about a “Demon Dog,” which will destroy their world when it flies, an evil event that is at hand! While the horror movie rejects lament their fate, the Metropolis Marvel leaps into action, tearing open the stone floor and finding another high tech facility below the planet cradling catacombs, finally discovering the very Demon Dog itself, just as it takes flight!

The strange winged hound, it turns out, is a mechanical delivery system for a poison spray which was designed to eliminate life on the artificial planetoid….for….reasons? Whatever lunatic logic was behind its creation, Superman smashes the poisonous pooch and saves the day for Transilvane and its movie-monster denizens. At this point, Jimmy finally recovers from the explosion that knocked them out, and he joins his heroic pal to observe a fleet of flying coffins shrinking back into the mini-world, their mission accomplished, I suppose? At this point, Superman explains the situation….or at least, it’s as close to an explanation as we get. As we had already discovered, Dabney Donovan apparently somehow created this miniature world, along with an entire race of sentient life, and for some reason, he played classic horror films on the clouds as that life evolved, so they copied what they saw, becoming a race of B-picture players.

It’s basically the plot of the famous ‘gangster planet’ episode of Star Trek, “A Piece of the Action”, except even wackier and not nearly as charming. On top of all of that, apparently Donovan, completely unconcerned with the fact that he had created life had planned on cleaning the slate, for more ‘reasons’, presumably, and had cruelly declared this fact to the inhabitants of Transilvane, once more through cloud-movies. Superman and Jimmy decide to try to undo the weird, warping effects of Donovan’s choice of sky-entertainment (skyertainment?) by playing a different genre. Of all things, they choose a musical, Oklahoma!, and pull up chairs to watch the sky-screening. One can only wonder what kind of society would evolve from that choice…

So…that was certainly an interesting ride. It’s certainly not boring, but this tale is just so out there and disjointed, with so many different concepts pulling in so many different directions, that it just leaves you scratching your head and asking “why”? Why did Donovan hide his planetoid below a graveyard? Is he just a nutjob obsessed with horror movies? Why did he just abandon the experiment? Why bother killing the planet’s inhabitants if he abandoned it? What is the point of any of this? Well, we never learn any of the answers to those questions, and we never even meet Donovan. It’s a rather unsatisfying conclusion to an already weird adventure.

I do sort of enjoy the ending, with Superman and Jimmy sitting down to try to provide the Transilvaneites with something more wholesome to copy, though I rather question their choice. Kirby’s artwork is fun and dynamic, as usual, though I noticed several scenes that seemed stripped-down and unfinished, and I would wager that the infamous Vince Colletta is to blame for that. The Newsboys’ subplot was interesting, but it wrapped up rather quickly and dramatically, and I find myself wondering about its point as well. All-in-all, this issue just confirms the sense I had with the last one that this book is in need of a focus and a direction. Here’s hoping the next one will bring something more coherent from the mind of the King! I’ll give this one a disappointing and disjointed 2 Minutemen.


World’s Finest #207


Executive Editor: Julius Schwartz
Cover Artists: Curt Swan and Murphy Anderson

“A Matter of Light and Death!”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella
Editor: E. Nelson Bridwell

“Galloping Gold”
Writer: M.W. Wellman
Penciler/Inker: Edwin J. Smalle, Jr.
Editor: Whitney Ellsworth

“The Cosmic Idiots!”
Writer: Sid Gerson
Penciler: Gene Colan
Inker: Joe Giella

While this month brought us an issue of Jimmy Olsen with a cool cover but a weird, unsatisfying story, it also brings us this rather pleasant surprise of a comic, which is the exact opposite. Take a look at that cover. Despite the jeopardy of our heroes, it just about couldn’t be more boring. Oh no, Superman and Batman, the greatest super hero pair in the world, the eponymous “World’s Finest,” are being menaced by….a couple of guys? It doesn’t exactly fire the imagination. They have slightly more personality than the usual foot soldiers of the Generic Gang, but not by all that much, and the cover is largely blank, other than these four figures. And yet, the tale inside, which I fully expected to be a slog, held my attention and even kept me guessing, though the title sort of gives away the secret villain of the piece.

Our tale begins with a clandestine meeting, where three random guys, whose names I can’t be bothered to remember, are being contracted for a hit by a shadowy figure. The splash page reveals that the target is….Superman! That’s right, these random gunsels are being hired to whack the freaking Man of Steel. Even more surprising, the mysterious malefactor behind these mercenary machinations is none other than….Clark Kent himself! Well, as you might imagine, the hoods, not being complete morons, balk at being asked to kill the invulnerable alien sun god, but the not so mild-mannered reporter convinces them that he can provide them with magical means to complete the hit, and vanishes as proof (using super speed, of course).

This may seem quite silly; after all, what threat can three random guys pose to the Metropolis Marvel, but Len Wein actually does have a reason for this setup. In any case, as Clark flies away, we follow him to the arctic, where he uncovers a strange device that he calls the “Satan Staff,” which supposedly can kill his alter-ego. I rather expected that this was an artifact from an earlier story, so I was confused by the lack of an editor box, but once again, I was to discover that there was a reason for that. After stashing the device in a Metropolis park, Clark “wakes up” and realizes that had suffered from a blackout, apparently the third such episode! Afraid of what he’s doing with his lost time and unsure of how to solve the mystery enshrouding him, the Action Ace turns to the world’s greatest detective, the Batman!

Our scene shifts, and we join Batman taking out a gang. and doing a bit of bantering that would be rather out of place for the character these days but which is fun enough in context. Superman arrives just in time to help him clean up the captured crooks, and then shares his trouble with his friend. In response, the Dark Detective sets out to shadow the Metropolis Marvel in a series of disguises (which is a fun touch and gives us a nice montage), but discovers nothing through his trailing.

At the end of the day, Clark returns to his apartment to meet his ally, only to once again fall under strange influence and swat the Caped Crusader aside! Not to be deterred, the Dark Knight of course prepared for such an eventuality and preemptively planted a tracker on his pal. He trails the mind-controlled Man of Steel to another meeting with the assassin trio, where the reporter delivers the “Satan Staff”, and attacks after Clark leaves, smashing through a skylight in a wonderfully dramatic panel. After defeating two of the thugs in a skirmish, Batman is blitzed by the last one, who uses the magic device to trap the Masked Manhunter in a net summoned from thin air. The trio decide that, since they are businessmen, they won’t simply kill the Gotham Guardian for free; instead, they’ll auction off his death after they’ve taken care of his partner.

The Random Gang attempts to ambush Superman at the Metropolis Planetarium, where he’s setting up an exhibit on Krypton, which is a fun little touch, but his super hearing tips the hero off to their heinous plans. After a fun little fight, they manage to take him out by using the magic wand to bring a Kryptonian exhibit to life, which seemingly kills the Man of Might! The assassins trap his body in amber and return to finish Batman off, wondering when their contact will arrive with their fee.

It is then that our true antagonist makes his appearance, and it is none other than Dr. Light! This is the latest outing in his attempts to destroy the members of the Justice League by attacking them one at a time. He eventually reveals that he was the prime mover in this enterprise; having tapped into Superman’s brainwaves in a previous attack, he used that experience to hypnotically program his foe to arrange his own destruction with the Satan Staff, a weapon of his own devising. Dr. Light later explains that he developed the Staff after studying the magic of Zatanna, seeking to use such magic, Superman’s one remaining weakness, against his Kryptonian opponent. But why this elaborate charade? Well, it’s actually a rather funny reason. The Luminary Lunatic realized that, although he possesses the power to destroy the Justice League, he blows it every time he tires to defeat them, thus, he decided to work through intermediaries and to turn hes enemy’s own strength against him. That is both hilarious and reasonably clever.

At any rate, Dr. Light’s sudden arrival doesn’t have the effect on his contracted killers that he had hoped, as they want to keep the Satan Staff because of its power, so he straight up disintegrates them! That’s a great moment, and also stunningly brutal for a comic of this age. Yet, just as the bad Doctor is about to reclaim his weapon, a gloved hand beats him to the punch: the Dark Knight has freed himself! The two maneuver around, trying to get in position for a shot, but when the Caped Crusader fires the Staff, it passes harmlessly through the Lord of Luminescence, who then snatches the device and teleports away!

Is all lost? Not quite, as Superman suddenly bursts free from the amber, and Batman reveals that he foresaw Light’s avoidance of his attack, so he had maneuvered him in front of the Man of Steel’s yellow tomb so that the beam would strike it instead, breaking the spell and reviving his fallen friend. The Action Ace is steaming mad, so he leaves his partner in peril behind to settle the score with Light by his lonesome. The Kryptonian hero discovers his foe in a floating solid light fortress hidden in the Aurora Borealis, which is a really cool concept that Dillin’s art doesn’t quite capture.

Despite Superman getting the drop on him, Dr. Light is not without resources, and he hits the Man of Tomorrow with a red sunlight beam, weakening him, only for the hero to turn the tables on him by smashing through the floor and striking from an unexpected direction. It’s a great little action piece, and a satisfying conclusion to the conflict. Finally, the issue ends with Superman and Batman taking in one of Zatanna’s shows, where Batman laments the bruises he suffered through the contortions necessary to escape his bonds.

What a fun, enjoyable issue! I really had a good time reading it, especially considering that I thought I was in for a chore because of that clunker of a cover. The whole thing hangs together surprisingly well, with all of its different elements making sense once the mysteries are revealed. I really enjoy the interaction between Batman and Superman, and this tale accomplishes a feat that remains rare today, properly balancing the two character with their vastly different power levels. Both the Man of Steel and the Dark Knight get a chance to shine and be useful. And speaking of the Masked Manhunter, his portrayal here is fun, though a little too light in context of where the character is going in his own books. Still, I enjoyed this Batman, who doesn’t take himself entirely seriously, though he’s still mysterious and calculating.

On the villain front, it’s worth noting that, although Wein tries to give the trio of assassins a little personality, they are ultimately forgettable cats-paws, so much so that I really can’t remember any of their names as I write this, having read the issue just last night! On the other hand, Dr. Light is a great antagonist for this tale, and his portrayal is interesting and entertaining. Despite awful things done with the character in later days, I’ve always liked this classic version of Dr. Light. He’s got cool powers and a cool look. He’s generally a great ‘generic’ villain to throw at your heroes for a straightforward superhero adventure, as his motivations are pretty prosaic and simple. Dillin’s art was quite good as well, energetic, dynamic, and full of life, and we got a lot of lovely, creative panels throughout. Yet, there were a few missteps in there as well, like Zatanna’s horribly distorted legs in the panel to the left (she looks like she’s being viewed through a fun-house mirror!). All told, this is exactly the kind of superhero yarn I enjoy, creative, fun, action-packed, some mystery and surprises, and a touch of continuity and world-building to top it all off. I’ll give this entertaining issue a strong 4 Minutemen.


Final Thoughts:


Well dear readers, with these two books we at long last wrap up our trek through November 1971! I hope that y’all have found these tales worth the wait, though I don’t think even the best of them quite justifies the delay, ha! Nonetheless, I am pleased that we at least end on a positive note. Years between my posts has, I’m sure, tried your patience, and I appreciate all of those of you who have rejoined me now that I’ve emerged from the wild realms of a PhD program, busy semesters, and the general chaos of 2020!

It’s been an interesting month of comics, featuring more of the themes we’ve come to expect, with a little bit of environmental consciousness in one of our Superman stories, some more witches and occult outings, and the usual dash of counter-culture chaos. Interestingly, we are seeing both positive and negative portrayals of the counter-culture trends, with Robin’s ‘illuminating’ contact with a commune on one hand and Batgirl’s conflict with some truly heinous hippies on the other. We’ve had some unexpected gems, like Supergirl’s super-fun alien adventure, as well as some disappointing duds, like Jimmy Olsen’s visit to the planet of the Late-Late Show. We’ve also had more than our fair share of the wacky and the weird, with robo-Lincolns battling robo-Booths, and superfluous melting androids. It’s certainly been an interesting month, and I hope that y’all enjoyed joining me on our little trek.

I know that my wrap-up section here is shorter than normal, but there’s so much distance between me and the bulk of these stories now, since I read most of them ages ago, that I don’t have as much to say as usual. Nonetheless, I hope things will get back to normal in the months to come. I’ve also had to cut the “Headblow Headcount” for the moment, as I can’t figure out who to format it in the new WordPress editor. I’ll keep experimenting with it, and hopefully I’ll have that figured out by the next time a hero takes a crack to the cranium. So, until we begin our next month’s coverage, I hope that y’all will enjoy the final days of 2020, at least as much as possible. Here’s hoping that the next year will bring better fortunes and brighter skies for all of us! Until then, keep the Heroic Ideal alive, and join me again soon for another edition of Into the Bronze Age!

Into the Bronze Age: October 1971 (Part 2)

DC-Style-Guide-1

Welcome to another edition of Into the Bronze Age!  The world seems quite intent on falling to pieces around us, but let’s take a little time to look back at a simpler era and a better class of comic.  The big news in this edition is the finale of the (in)famous GL/GA drug story, but we’ve got a couple of other interesting books to keep that one company.

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #405
  • Adventure Comics #411
  • Detective Comics #416
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #86
  • Mr. Miracle #4
  • Phantom Strange #15
  • Superboy #178
  • Superman #243
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #115
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #142
  • Teen Titans #35

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Green Lantern/Green Arrow #86


Green_Lantern_Vol_2_86

“They Say It’ll Kill Me… But They Won’t Say When”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: Neal Adams
Inker: Dick Giordano
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Julius Schwartz

That’s right, at long last (longer because of my travels and distractions!) we come to the end of the GA/GL drug two-parter.  It’s a famous issue, and we examined why with the first one.  As we saw, these issues certainly deserve their iconic status, whatever flaws they may have, and I was surprised by how much better the first issue was than I remembered.  I was in for a similar shock with this story, which is a much more even-keeled offering than its predecessor.  We don’t have as many heavy-handed and goofy moments here as we did in the last one.  Even the cover has a touch more dignity…which is not to say it isn’t a bit over the top as well.  In fact, it is wonderfully, ridiculously melodramatic, especially with its bold tag-line.  I love Green Lantern’s ‘curse the heavens’ pose as well.  Still, it is effective, striking, and memorable, especially with the faces of the various drug victims making up the background.

Unfortunately, the touching image of Green Arrow carrying the fallen form of his ward isn’t quite what greets us inside, where things start off with a bang…or more accurately, a backhand.  Ollie follows up Roy’s dramatic confession from last issue with a smack to the face and a heavy dose of vitriol.  It’s a really stunning moment, and O’Neil hits us with it right out of the gate.  To see a hero, in his right mind, treat a faltering friend like this in 1971 was practically unprecedented.  It serve’s O’Neil’s purpose, immediately casting the Emerald Archer’s merciless dismissal of his surrogate son’s suffering in the worst light.  Unfortunately, he overplays his hand once more, and the result is a further stain on Ollie’s already fairly blackened character, though it is consistent with the strong views he evinced in the last issue.  It’s just an ugly moment, not helped by the fact that Roy isn’t at his most sympathetic after his weak story last issue.

green lantern 086 003

Speedy mocks his mentor for his violent response, hitting him with a major guilt trip, and Arrow throws the kid out.  Then we get a moment which ALMOST addresses some of the flaws of the previous story, as the Battling Bowman ponders the situation and points out that, even though he hadn’t paid his ward much attention lately, the kid shouldn’t have needed much at his age, being in college and all.  Then O’Neil once again turns Ollie’s jerk dial to 11, as, from that, he concludes that he is completely “innocent of blame,” which is a self-righteousness and self-deception that is breathtaking, even for O’Neil’s Green Arrow.  Still, in all of this melodrama, there is some realism.

After concluding that he’s father of the year after all, the Emerald Archer sets out to take revenge on the pushers who he blames instead, heading to the airfield where he previously traced their supply to pick the investigation back up.  Meanwhile the two junkies who betrayed our heroes last issue come to Ollie’s place looking for Speedy and, not finding him, decide to shoot up their reward.  The drugs are pure, and one of them overdoses in what is, admittedly, a pretty good scene, though Adams perhaps overdoes the revelation a bit.

Later, we find Hal Jordan still running through previous events, unable to shake the feeling that there is something wrong with Speedy, and when he heads to GA’s to check on the kid, he finds the junkie and begins his own investigation.  Ollie, for his part, turns the table on a guard at the airport who gets the drop on him and is sent into a trap for his troubles.  It’s a nice scene, emphasizing both his anger and his skill, that he’s still dangerous, even with a busted wing.

green lantern 086 012

In the meantime, the Emerald Gladiator finds Speedy passed out in an alley and discovers the truth.  They have an almost decent conversation, though O’Neil overdoes the youth’s rhetoric a bit.  The generation gap stuff he spouts is a little problematic given the fact that most of the members of the previous generation Roy knows are freaking paragons of virtue.  Nonetheless, Hal’s measured response and kindness is a very pleasant departure from his stupidity and naivete from early in the run.  The ring-slinger takes the kid to Dinah’s house for sanctuary.

On the docks, where the Battling Bowman has followed the guard’s tip into trouble, he finds the thugs he tangled with at the airport last issue.  We get a nice fight scene, with Arrow still holding his own, but it ends with him getting knocked out.  When he comes to, we meet the man behind the drug operation, a wealthy socialite named Saloman, whose massive yacht, stuffed full of important people, is just leaving.  He tells his men to dump the antagonistic archer into the drink as soon as he’s away.

green lantern 086 018Adams gives us a fantastic image of Ollie’s plight, as he’s tossed overboard tied to an anchor, but the hero manages to grab an acetylene arrow and cut through the chains, making a desperate and dramatic escape.  Just then, the Lantern arrives and disposes of the thugs with some green gorillas.  As they pursue the head honcho, Speedy is busy going through withdrawals, aided by Black Canary’s quiet compassion in another good sequence, improved by a lack of dialog.

In the Caribbean, Saloman Hooper visits his pharmaceutical lab, where he picks up a suitcase worth of dope (which doesn’t seem like enough to justify the scope of his operation), only to be caught in the act by the Green Team.  While Ollie takes out the mogul’s minion with a one-armed arrow shot (shades of Dark Knight Returns!), Hal tosses his friend his ring in order to deal with Hooper with his own two hands.  This is actually a pretty believable, satisfying moment, unlike the book’s tendency to have the Lantern just decide that he needs to use his fists to feel like a man.  He’s angry, and he takes it out on this privileged punk, but he has enough self control to do it ‘unofficially,’ so to speak, like a cop putting aside his badge to do something that needs doing but which falls outside of the law.  Notably, Arrow calls him on this afterward.

green lantern 086 019

The issue ends with the funeral of the junkie who overdosed, where Hal and Ollie are joined by Dinah and a recovered Roy.  Unfortunately, the newly clean Titan is in no mood to mend fences, and he lashes out at his former guardian, giving a speech about how people like him, who lack compassion, are contributing to the crisis that so many young people face.  As Speedy walks away from the closest thing to family that he has, Green Arrow finds himself proud that the boy has become a man.

green lantern 086 028

That final scene isn’t as heavy-handed as I remember, though the melodrama still sets my teeth on edge a bit.  What’s worse, it leaves the situation between our hero and his surrogate son unresolved and embittered.  That’s a shame, and this story’s consequences will be deep and long-felt.  On the whole though, this is actually quite a good issue, sensitive and perceptive, but also an engaging and exciting adventure, with some real, if sometimes discordant, character development to go with it.  Once again, the message of compassion and understanding towards drug addicts is powerful, and the theme of empathy, learning to see things from someone else’s perspective, is effective and an interesting continuation of O’Neil’s better efforts in this run.  I think the story itself would have been a bit more effective if we had met our villain a bit earlier, as he’s mostly just a convenient and morally acceptable punching bag, an outlet for outrage and despair.  Still, O’Neil manages to make the guy loathsome in very little space.  Roy’s sudden and complete recovery is more than a little silly, in regards to the reality of addiction, but I suppose allowances can be made for the medium.

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Adams’ art continues to be beautiful and compelling, really capturing the emotion and the power of the moments he portrays.  And yet, even with that focus on drama, he manages to give us some fun and funny moments, like with Ollie’s expression during his impromptu dive.  Once again, we see Adams’ power with a more intimate, personal story.  I just love his portrayal of Ollie.  Characters of that scale are really what he excels at, which is part of why his Batman run is so legendary.  All in all, this is a very good story, only slightly damaged by O’Neil’s excesses and his lack of forethought.  It is an important comic, culturally, and its themes and subject were incredibly groundbreaking in its time.  Heck, we’re still fighting some of these battles, and a story that reminds us of the humanity of those who are suffering is still relevant, perhaps moreso these days than in recent years.  I’ll give this milestone issue 4.5 Minutemen out of 5.  It isn’t perfect, but it really is a good one.

P.S.: To mark just how important his comic book was, it carries a copy of a letter from the Mayor of New York, commending the creative team for their work and pointing out the seriousness of the drug crisis.

 


Mister Miracle #4


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“The Closing Jaws of Death!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta
Editor: Jack Kirby

“The Romance of Rip Carter”
Writers: Jack Kirby and Joe Simon
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Joe Simon

“Jean Lafitte: ‘Pirate or Patriot?'”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Jack Kirby

We’ve got another marvel-packed issue of Mister Miracle here, and, as always, I was excited to read it, especially after the pulse-pounding excitement of last issue’s Paranoid-packed pandemonium.  Sadly, this one doesn’t quite live up to the thrill of the first half, though it does introduce us to a wonderful character and an important part of Scott Free’s supporting cast.  It’s got another great cover, like most of this series, though one wonders how our escape-artist hero gets from being locked in a trunk to tortured in a medieval dungeon.  The answer is, of course, Kirby madness.  Nonetheless, we get another death-defying scene in this cover, memorable and exciting, beautifully rendered by the King.

Inside, we don’t start with the miraculous one plummeting to his death, still locked in that suitcase, but back at his home, where a fretting Oberon finds himself with an uninvited guest.  A fierce and outlandishly armored warrior woman appears behind him, jarring the loyal fellow from his reverie rather violently.  She declares herself a friend of Scott Free and demands to know where he is, mentioning they both come from Apokolips.  When Oberon mentions Doctor Bedlam, the newly introduced Barda suddenly teleports after her friend, fearing for his life.

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Now we pick up where we left off, and Scott’s situation looks hopeless, but Barda appears in a flash of light and catches his suitcase in a feat of strength, casually ripping it apart, ropes and all, only to reveal that it is…empty!  Wonderfully, we don’t see how the eminent escape artist pulled off this trick just yet; instead, we see him perched on a balcony several floors up, where he is quickly swarmed by more crazed civilians.  They think he is a vampire and attempt to stake him, but Mr. Miracle is too slick for them, and eludes his pursuers in several fun pages, even sliding down the banister of the staircase like Errol Flynn.

mrmiracle-12Suddenly, he’s attacked by refugees from a Robin Hood picture, as a bunch of guys in medieval costumes capture the hero.  They drag him into a dungeon, which turns out to be a set in the Galaxy Broadcasting TV studio, conveniently located on this level.  Inside is a director, even nuttier than most, who directs his men to kill the interloper so that his death-throes can make for good television!  Despite his struggles, Scott is forced into an iron maiden, and all seems lost as the lid slams shut.  The whole scene is fun but utterly crazy.  It reads like a Fantastic Four issue from the era where Stan and Jack weren’t talking to each other and Stan was thrown into narrative gymnastics in an attempt to explain the bizarre and unrelated images Jack created as his imagination ran away with him.  However, this time, there’s nobody to blame for the sudden shift and strange explanation other than Kirby himself.  I guess he just wanted to draw an iron maiden, so he shoe-horned the setting in, logic be darned!

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Back in our original office-building setting, Barda is getting attacked herself.  She casually rips a stone column out of the lobby and tosses it onto a half dozen men, almost certainly crushing them all to death.  Despite Mr. Miracle’s insistence that she stay out of this so that his deal with Bedlam could be honored, she is worried, so she pursues her friend, smashing her way through the overly-excited extras in the process in a really nice panel.  Yet, when she pries open the torture device, it is empty, and Scott casually strolls up and greets her.  Once again, we don’t find out how he accomplished this yet, establishing a running joke in the issue.

The two press on, confronting the disembodied energy-form of their antagonist in another nice sequence.  Bedlam promises to unleash the entire fury of the building’s trapped inhabitants upon the pair, but the next thing we see is them teleport back home, greeting a worried Oberon and catching up.  The dialog in this section is pretty rough and stilted, especially when Scott awkwardly declares: “Maximum is the word for you, Barda!  I could never think of you without deep and genuine fondness.”  I know that line just makes the ladies swoon!  From the start, Barda and Oberon are sparring verbally which, despite the dull dialog, is still fun.  We learn that Barda helped her friend escape, but she didn’t go with him, and now she’s an officer in Darkseid’s Female Furies, as everyone helpfully spouts exposition.

In a fun little scene, Scott takes the domestic roll, preparing dinner for Barda, which is really striking in a comic from 1971.  That’s honestly somewhat groundbreaking.  I doubt you’d ever see Superman making dinner for Lois Lane!  It also establishes the unusual dynamic between these two characters.  As he works, the heroic homemaker reluctantly explains to his assistant how he escaped from the various traps he faced.  We’re introduced to the ‘multi-cube’, Scott’s multi-purpose escape tool, which will become a common feature of his stories, if I remember correctly.  Mr. Miracle used it to cut his way out of the trunk as it twisted in mid-air, which works pretty well as an explanation.

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Unfortunately, the other stories aren’t nearly as good.  He used a fast-acting acid on the back of the iron maiden and literally just stepped through it, which apparently no-body noticed.  Even more problematic, he literally presses the ‘off’ button on all of the panicked people in the tower, putting them to sleep with his multi-cube and just waltzing out the front door.  Okay……why not just do that in the first place?  That’s a pretty massively unsatisfying conclusion, which is a shame, because this is otherwise a really fun issue.  The yarn ends with Barda showing up for dinner, having changed out of her armor into something a tad more revealing, leaving Oberon picking his jaw up off the floor.

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This is a solid adventure, despite its glaring deus ex machina, though it is primarily worthwhile for introducing Big Barda, who will eventually become Scott’s partner and wife, creating one of the great comic relationships and partnerships.  Mr. Miracle without Barda is like Nick without Nora, and she is, even from this first appearance, a unique and interesting character, further credit to Kirby’s boundless creativity.  In addition, I absolutely love Scott’s laughing, devil-may-care attitude throughout the story, the extra element of flair and style to his antics, which really capture his personality and are part of why I love the character.  I also quite like the running gag of not explaining his escapes right away, however flawed the execution is here.  Hopefully Kirby will make better use of it in the future.

Art-wise, we’re seeing some rough panels again with this issue, and I think Colletta’s impact is still being felt.  On the plus side, it seems we get a new inker next issue!  Despite some weaknesses, especially with inking and coloring, there are some wonderful panels and some fun, dynamic sequences throughout.  Ultimately, I’m quite torn on the score.  This issue’s flaws are significant, especially the dialog and weak conclusion, but it is also a lot of fun.  I suppose I’ll be generous and go with 3.5 Minutemen, as the comic is carried along by the interest of Barda and the fun of Scott.

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The Phantom Stranger #15


Phantom_Stranger_Vol_2_15

“The Iron Messiah”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler/Inker: Jim Aparo
Colourist/Letterer: Jim Aparo
Editor: Joe Orlando
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

“I Battled for the Doom Stone”
Writer: Ed Herron
Penciler: Alex Toth
Inker: Alex Toth

“Satan’s Sextet”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Tony DeZuniga
Inker: Tony DeZuniga

“I Scout Earth’s Strangest Secrets”
Writer: Jack Miller
Penciler: Mort Meskin
Inker: Mort Meskin

What a wildly, wonderfully ridiculous cover image.  It’s gloriously strange and unusual and so very, very much something that could only happen in comics.  We’ve got an African witch doctor raising a zombie…but not just any zombie, a ROBO-zombie, complete with stainless-steel robo-zombie Afro, all while the shadow of the Phantom Stranger looms in the background.  It’s a thing of mad beauty, and I love it.  It’s beautifully illustrated by Adams, and it absolutely grabs your attention.  Could you honestly say you could see that image on the newsstand and NOT want to figure out what in the blue blazes is happening inside?  If so, I can only assume you’re an imagination-less wreck of a human being.

The story within doesn’t quite live up to the glory of the robo-zombie cover, but then, how could it?  It is an interesting and unusual one, though, and it begins, not with necromantic robotics (more’s the pity), but with a young African scientist named John Kweli, who is returning to his native country after having been educated in the West.  Suddenly, the train on which he’s traveling derails in a fiery crash, and the brilliant man would have died, if not for a Stranger pulling him from the wreckage.  Kewli awakens in the home of an old friend, Ororo (no, not that one).  She has treated his injuries, but she also bears bad news, his father, the tribal chief, has died.

John is prepared to come home and take over his responsibilities as chief, but he’s met with resentment for having gone away to be educated and built a life overseas.  His people feel like he abandoned them, including the lovely Ororo.  He also finds things greatly changed, with signs of unrest and oppression everywhere, barbed-wire and troops abound.  Ngumi, the village shaman also rejects John, promising that Chuma, the Warrior God, will free his people without the young man’s help.

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Ororo tells her friend about what has happened in his absence, that though their country has been liberated, they are now enslaved to the interests of big foreign business.  Driving away, John and Ororo encounter a lion and wreck their jeep.  The young scientist bravely prepares to sacrifice his life to lure the beast away, only to have the Phantom Stranger leap out of nowhere to tackle the feline fiend in magical fashion.

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The next day, Kewli goes to visit Amos Trent, the oil company’s man on the ground, but Trent isn’t interested in his pleas or his threats, so the young scientist decides to take matters into his own hands, so of course he builds a robot.  Some time later, a group of soldiers who are abusing the villagers are scattered, not by John, but by “Chuma”, the Iron Messiah, the android John has used his scientific skill to build in order to rally his people.  Over the next weeks, Chuma trains the villagers in the ways of war, and Ngumi, the shaman is revealed as an agent of the oil company.

Unfortunately, even iron will can be bent by such a burden, and Chuma begins to develop human feelings…and human frailties.  He declares his love for Ororo, and when she rejects him, saying she loves his creator instead, the Iron Messiah rejects his role as savior and leaves the people to the fate.  It is here that the Phantom Stranger intervenes once again, convincing the automaton that the only way to prove he is a being with a soul is to choose to help his people, to be better than jealousy and spite.  Back at the village, the government troops have attacked, and John has rallied the people, but they are losing without the power of Chuma to inspire and aid them.

Chuma charges into the battle, turning the tide, but his help comes at a terrible cost, as he shoots his creator in the back in a fit of jealousy, only to be witnessed and called out by Ororo.  The people reject their Iron Messiah and destroy him, thanks again to the Phantom Stranger, who leaves, pondering the enigma that is life and giving a speech about not “tampering in God’s domain.

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It’s…a little abrupt, really, and rather grim.  These 14 pages pack a whole lot in, and Len Wein has a very interesting story to tell…I’m just not entirely sure he’s finished telling it.  We get a robot who develops human feelings, including hatred who turns on his creator, a full on Frankenstein, but it is also sharing space with a story about the exploitation of Africa.  There’s just too much in too little space.  Chuma literally goes from his creation to his renunciation of his purpose in three pages, and John, who has until then been our protagonist, almost drops out of the story at that point.  The Stranger’s attempt at a moral just feels extremely tacked on, though it certainly has potential.  In the end, what exactly was the point of the Stranger’s intervention?  Was it to free the natives from both the outsiders and from their superstitions?  Whatever it is, it needs more development.  The whole thing is cramped, but it is also intriguing in a number of ways.

It is really noteworthy that we have a story set in ‘darkest Africa’ where the natives are not portrayed as ignorant savages, despite their belief and hope in Chuma.  Even more, the natives are not rescued by a white outsider.  Instead, the hero is a black man, and a black scientist at that, who succeeds, not through brute force, but through intelligence and cleverness.  That’s still very much a rarity in any media in 1971, much more so in comics.  We also have another example of the depredations of faceless corporations, as the oil company is pretty unambiguously evil here.  That is a sign of things to come, I’d wager.

The whole tale is beautifully illustrated by Aparo, who is handling all of the art chores.  He gives us some really striking panels and pages, and the art has a nice sense of drama, especially with Chuma.  I’ll give this rushed, slightly muddled story 3 Minutemen, as its strengths and weaknesses somewhat even out.

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“Satan’s Sextet”


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If you thought robo-messiahs were strange, you ain’t seen nothing yet.  Our Dr. Thirteen backup this month is in the style that I think works best, with the good Doctor doing his ghost-breaking on his own, without tangling with the Stranger.  Nonetheless, this particular outing isn’t exactly a home run.  It begins promisingly and strangely enough, with a group of seemingly sinister musicians leading a line of dancers into the sea, where they presumably drown, only for the band to emerge later, still playing.  Later that night, Dr. Thirteen happens to be driving along the beach when he sees a ragged, raving figure stumble out of the surf.

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The man claims to be the wealthy Willard Wentworth, who has a home on the beach.  He hired “Satan’s Sextet” for a house party because he was lonely, but they hypnotized all of the guests and led them to a watery grave.  Wentworth isn’t sure how he escaped, but he stumbled out of the water sometime later, shaken and terrified.  Thirteen agrees to investigate, but when they return to the beach house, they find it packed with people, a party in full swing.  The owner claims not to know any of them and accuses the band of murder.  Dr. Thirteen insists they stay and continue their investigation (Maybe he just wants to party!), and the pair are given love-beads.

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Suddenly, the band’s music becomes hypnotic, and they once more lead the party goers into the waves.  Thirteen is forced to follow, but his mind is working all the while, and he deduces that the beads are responsible, and he removes his and Wentworth’s necklaces.  Returning to the house, he overhears the convenient exposition by the bandleader, whose motives are…well, as prosaic as his methods are insane.

Apparently, he’s the millionaire’s disowned son, who got plastic surgery and planned this whole thing to kill his father so he could get his inheritance.  The beads had hallucinogens in them which were activated by the vibrations of the band’s music.  Ooookaaaay.  That’s pretty out there, even for comics.  Entertainingly, Thirteen overcomes the band with a massive mounted fish, and the police arrive to tidy things up.  Dr. Thirteen rides off into the sunrise, but not before laying some major guilt on Wentworth, pointing out that he must have really screwed up to raise a murderer!  Ouch!

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This is a fun concept that sadly doesn’t really deliver a good story.  The image of the Pied-Piper-esq murder is really neat and creepy, but the explanation and the motivations don’t live up to the cleverness of the gimmick.  I think this might have worked better as a Phantom Stranger story, with an actual supernatural explanation.  Nonetheless, it’s a decent enough read.  The sequence where Dr. Thirteen reasons his way to the solution to the mystery is quite solid, and it has a nice sense of suspense and stakes as he slowly drowns.  Tony DeZuninga’s art isn’t particularly impressive, but it does the job, though the inking is a bit overdone in some sections.  He tries to create a somewhat psychedelic feel to the band’s sections, and that is partially successful.  I’ll give the whole thing 2.5 Minutemen.

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And with those maudlin mysteries, this episode of Into the Bronze Age comes to a close!  It was a really interesting trio of books, flaws and all.  Thank you for joining me on this journey, and please come back soon for another edition of Into the Bronze Age!  Until then, keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: August 1971 (Part 4)

DC-Style-Guide-1

“Ping! Ping! Ping!”  Mother Box says, “Welcome to another edition of Into the Bronze Age!”  Clearly New Genesis technology is so advanced as to have developed excellent taste.  As proof, I’ve got a smattering of classic comics for you, including the next chapter in Jack Kirby’s epic Fourth World Saga!  It’s an honestly intriguing trio of books on the docket in this bunch, so let’s jump right in!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #403
  • Adventure Comics #409
  • Batman #233 (Reprints)
  • Batman #234
  • Detective Comics #414
  • The Flash #208
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #85 (the infamous drug issue)
  • Justice League of America #91
  • Mr. Miracle #3
  • The Phantom Stranger #14
  • Superman #241
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #112
  • Teen Titans #34
  • World’s Finest #204

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Mr. Miracle #3


Mister_Miracle_Vol_1_3

“The Paranoid Pill!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta

We start off on a great foot, with this Kirby classic where the King is starting to hit his stride with his unusual superhero.  Ironically, this is probably one of his Mr. Miracle run’s weakest covers, while also being one of his more memorable stories.  The crowd in the image looks suitably maddened, but the perspective is a bit wonky, and the coloring job lets it down, with the mixture of single color and full color characters being a bit distracting.  And why in the world is our hero completely white?  The composition feels unbalanced and crowded by the title, though it effectively captures the feel of the issue.

And the issue is definitely a good one, though it suffers from some of the Kirby-as-writer excesses we’ve been noting.  Having learned at the Stan Lee School of Exposition, where the only thing better than text is yet more text, the King overwrites throughout, starting with the first scene.  A number of silver androids, called “animates,” swarm through a Boom Tube into an empty room, where they set up an office, and the caption declares that “Sometimes, there are things that take place in empty rooms that defy belief, and so go unnoticed!”  Think about that for a moment, as written.  I don’t think that something taking place in an empty room is escaping notice because it “defies belief.”  It might just be because the room is…you know…empty.

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Nonetheless, we discover that these silver creatures are artificial constructs, all animated by a single mind, a creature that was once a man but has now become a being of pure energy.  This being is Dr. Bedlam, who slowly takes possession of one of his animates, molding it into the shape he wore in life.  Despite the overwritten dialog, this is a pretty cool scene, and there is a nice air of menace to the whole tableau.  What’s more, while this type of sci-fi concept is pretty common in the genre today, popping up in modern shows like Babylon 5 and the like, it strikes me that it must have been much more groundbreaking in 1971.  I can only think of one example in comics that predates it (though there may be more), and that is NoMan from the T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents, and I can’t think of any well-known sci-fi novels before this point that explored the idea of beings of pure energy inhabiting temporary bodies.  The use of actual brain transplants and such parallels are much more common and date back to the beginning of the century, as early as the John Carter novels (1927).  Yet, this seems pretty original.  Once again, Kirby is just casually tossing out fascinating and innovative ideas that could easily support much larger works.

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The unique Dr. Bedlam, after taking possession of his body, dismisses the rest of his animates and, with super overly dramatic dialog, picks up the phone and calls Scott Free!  I quite like Bedlam’s design, in keeping with many of the other Apokoliptians we’ve seen so far, but bearing his own sinister identity.  His call finds Mr. Miracle in his usual position, strapped into an elaborate trap and preparing an escape.  It’s a great splash page of wonderful Kirby art.  Scott and Oberon have a fun back and forth as the escape artist asks his assistant to get the phone, completely unconcerned about the nearness of a rather messy death.  Poor Oberon.  This job can’t be good for his blood pressure.  Casually escaping the trap with a full second to spare, the hero answers the phone and receives a challenge, which he accepts.

 

After the call, Scott tries to explain what Bedlam is, offering that he is pure mental energy, making him very dangerous, but adding that Mother Box is fortunately able to guard against such psionic assaults.  What follows is a fairly cool sequence that doesn’t get enough explanation.  Mr. Miracle conducts a seance of sorts with Oberon in which he contacts Dr. Bedlam and experiences a mental attack, and using Mother Box, weathers the storm.  It’s a creepy and suitably imaginative scene, but the purpose and motivations behind it are really unclear.  Does Scott do this to head off an attack he expects, or is this just a way to show Oberon Bedlam’s power?  Kirby’s slightly muddy writing doesn’t clarify.  Yet, the scene does have the effect of establishing the power and threat of the bad Doctor, which is something.

 

After scaring poor Oberon half to death, Mr. Miracle takes to the sky and heads to a high-rise where he is to meet the Apokoliptian.  There, Bedlam offers the escape artist a choice, either surrender to his citizen’s arrest, or escape from a trap of his devising.  It’s never made clear why Scott would show up in the first place, but he is the kind of guy that likes to face danger head-on, so I can at least partially hand-wave that.

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Anyway, the Dr. tells the slippery superhero that all he has to do is descend through the 50 stories of the building and walk out through the front door, but to make things interesting, he shows his foe the substance of his trap, a concoction he calls the Paranoid Pill, which he drops into the building’s ventilation system.  Soon the drug does its work, turning the everyday inhabitants of the office building into madmen, and the tower is full of “an army of unreasoning, unpredictable, unstoppable enemies!”  Mr. Miracle lashes out, but Dr. Bedlam simply abandons his animate, which is a nice touch, a villain that cannot really be fought.

 

mr miracle 03-13 the paranoid pill

A great page, absolutely full of menace.

 

Kirby provides a wonderful illustration of the Paranoia Pill taking hold, with people panicking and running wild throughout the building, and it isn’t long before a gang of maddened men burst into the office that traps our hero.  Sensibly, Scott tries the window, only to find it charged with “cosmi-current,” leaving him only one way out.  He flies along the ceiling in a great sequence, dodging the ad-hoc attacks of the panicked populace flooding the halls.  He narrowly escapes into the elevator, only to be attacked by a gun-totting citizen and forced to flee a host of ricocheting rounds on the 45th floor.

 

Unfortunately he leaps right into the arms of another crazed crowd, who, in their delusional state, mistake him for a demon.  The carry him along and lock him into a trunk, which they bind closed with rope and chains before deciding to dispose of this “demon” by chucking him down the central shaft of the building.  The comic ends on wonderful cliffhanger, with the trapped Mr. Miracle plummeting 45 floors to his doom!

 

This is a great issue, featuring a really unique and fitting challenge for the character.  The tower-turned-death-trap is a big enough threat to fill the comic (and then some), and the trope of innocents turned into threats is always a good twist to throw at a hero.  Kirby does a great job with the art throughout this issue, but his work on the crowds is just fantastic.  They’re individual and varied, as are their reactions to the gas itself.  Mr. Miracle’s desperate race through the high-rise makes for good action, and it’s nice to see him use his wits to escape rather than just plot devices and “Applied Phlebotinum.”   Bedlam makes for a good villain, and his gimmick is suitably creepy and outlandish.  Once again, I find myself in awe of Kirby’s creativity and the casual way in which he pours out innovative concepts.  Other than the overwritten sections and the lack of clear explanations, this is a good, solid adventure tale.  I’ll give it 4 Minutemen.

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Superman #241


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“The Shape of Fear!”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: Curt Swan
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Editors: Julius Schwartz and E. Nelson Bridwell
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

“Superman’s Neighbors”
Writer: Bill Finger
Penciler: Wayne Boring
Inker: Stan Kaye

“Superman’s Day of Truth!”
Writer: Leo Dorfman
Penciler: Curt Swan
Inker: George Klein

Here we are at the penultimate issue of Denny O’Neil’s innovative but rather weird run on Superman.  This comic is no exception to that description either, featuring a strange mix of elements.  Beginning with the cover itself, which is, of course, beautifully illustrated by Neal Adams, the issue is full of rather odd choices.  I like the image of the monster dragging our defeated hero and his doppelganger away, but the design for the monster itself is a bit curious, with its tail coming out of the center of its back rather than out of its tailbone as you might expect.  Also note the sign referencing New York.  Randomly, this story seems to be set in New York rather than Metropolis, down to including several New York landmarks.  Strange settings aside, it’s a solid enough cover, if not exceptional.  You can’t help but wonder what could defeat two Supermen.

The story itself begins where last issue left off, with the former Man of Steel, now just the Man of Flesh, having defeated the Intergang assassins.  I-Ching offers to complete the ceremony to restore the hero’s powers, but Superman refuses!  In a surprising and rather moving twist, Clark has a crisis of doubt.  He’s tasted what it’s like to be a mortal man (ignoring for the nonce that he’s experienced that TONS of times over the course of his career), and he sees now a chance to be free of the loneliness and crushing responsibility of being Superman.  It’s a great moment, but O’Neil doesn’t give it enough space to breathe.  No sooner does it begin than it is already ending.  I-Ching emphasizes that “one does not choose responsibility!  It is often thrust upon one!” and “To refuse it is to commit the worst act of cowardice.”  Despairing, the Kryptonian relents, and tells the old mystic to work his magic.

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I-Ching draws Superman’s spirit out of his body and sends it soaring off to find his dusty duplicate.  When the hero’s soul-form encounters his double, it drains the creature of its stolen powers, leaving it weakened and helpless.  When his spirit returns to his body, the Man of Steel finds himself full powered once more and rushes off to test himself.  He smashes a meteoroid, races around the Earth, and then spots a purse snatcher upon whom he can test his powers.  Faster than a speeding bullet, or a running thief, for that matter, the Action Ace builds a complete jail cell around the startled man in the middle of the street.  The people of Metropolis aren’t too pleased, and thus begins a display of classic Super-dickery.

 

superman 241 p_015The hero has suddenly become overbearing, brash, and more than a little selfish, and he begins to handle even the most minor of crimes with outlandish responses, like when he picks up a speeding car and deposits it on top of the Empire State Building (like I said, we’re suddenly in New York).  He also meets I-Ching up there at the blind man’s request.  The mystic points out this strange behavior and tells Superman that he thinks the Man of Tomorrow suffered brain damage when he was mortal, which enrages the hero.  Unable to convince the Metropolis Marvel that something is wrong, I-Ching turns again to magic, all the while talking about how it is a really bad idea because he doesn’t really know what he’s doing.  I knew they should have contacted Dr. Fate!

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The martial arts master conjures a spell to track the Sand Superman, and when he and Diana Prince find the weakened creature, they learn its origins.  Apparently it’s a being from the “Realm of Quarrm,” which I-Ching helpfully describes as “a state of alternate possibilities!  A place where neither men nor things exist…only unformed, shapeless begins!”  Sure, why not?

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The explosion that destroyed the world’s kryptonite ripped a hole between dimensions between Earth and Quarrm, and the energy that leaked out mingled with that of Superman as he lay stunned in the sand, eventually giving form to the formless.  Each time the two got close to each other, the Sandman gathered more and more power from his opposite number.  In a desperate bid, I-Ching plans to use this creature to drain Superman once more, but unbeknownst to them, a new tear has opened, and more energy begins to leak into this world.

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Sneaking into Morgan Edge’s apartment (for some reason), Diana calls Superman to lure him into their trap.  When he arrives, his dusty duplicate drains some of his powers, but the headstrong hero manages to escape.  Meanwhile, a shadowy figure watches from a soundproofed room.  Mysterious!  Down on the street, fate takes a hand as nearby in Chinatown a parade is underway and the energy from Quarrm seeps into a statue of an “Oriental War Demon,” which suddenly comes to life and runs amuck.  The Man of Steel stops his flight in order to investigate, showing that he is still somewhat himself, only to be drained once more and fall from the sky, to collapse helplessly at the mercy of the Quarrm-demon.

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There’s a lot going on in this issue, and you have to give O’Neil credit for creativity.  He’s certainly telling new stories.  Whether or not they’re also good stories…well, that’s a different question.  In this case, there are definitely strengths that recommend this yarn, like the moment of mature emotion that grips Superman when he is faced with the prospect of a normal life.  It’s just a shame that this dilemma isn’t given more (or any) development because it has a lot of potential.  Also, despite how time-worn the Super-dickery trope is, at least it is given a fairly reasonable explanation here, as the Man of Steel took a blow to the head while he was vulnerable.  How do you force a demigod to get help if he doesn’t want it?  There are some weaknesses here too, though, including a general sense of disconnectedness between the different elements of the plot.  I-Ching’s vaguely defined abilities and general inscrutableness don’t help matters, really.  The sudden return of Superman’s powers once again illustrate how over-powered he is in the Silver Age.  I find myself hoping that, once this arc is finished, O’Neil will leave him at least a little weaker.

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Curt Swan’s art is largely great, as usual, but I’m noticing that in the current iteration of Superman, he tends to draw the character’s legs as too short and stumpy at times.  His work on the demon is alternately nicely rendered or a bit cartoonish.  The creature’s design in general and the sudden injection of Chinese elements into the tale seems a bit incongruous, despite the involvement of I-Ching, because these events seem to have nothing to do with him.  Thus, the fact that the Quarrm energy just happens to inhabit a Chinese demon statue ends up feeling rather random.  So, in the end, this is a solid continuation of the story, even if it doesn’t quite come together successfully.  I’ll give it 3.5 Minutemen.

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The Phantom Stranger #14


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“The Man with No Heart!”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler: Jim Aparo
Inker: Jim Aparo
Colourist: Jim Aparo
Letterer: Jim Aparo
Editor: Joe Orlando
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

“Spectre of the Stalking Swamp!”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler: Tony DeZuniga
Inker: Tony DeZuniga

What a cover!  That is a wonderful composition, with the incredibly menacing swamp monster rising from the water, his shape only partially defined and gloriously creepy in its uncertainty and inhumanity.  Apparently muck monsters are just in the zeitgeist over at DC at this time!  It’s a great scene, very fitting for a monster story with the blissfully unaware couple in the foreground, though I’m not entirely certain what I think of the Phantom Stranger’s outline hanging out there in the background.  This is especially true because, unusually, this cover does not relate to our headline tale.  Instead, this is an image from the Dr. Thirteen backup.

Nonetheless, I think any kid with an interest in horror or the supernatural would be hard pressed to resist the lure of that image.  Inside, despite the disappointment of not finding the Phantom Stranger locked in combat with shambling swamp monster, we still find a gripping and arresting story.  It begins on a stormy night in New York (Again with New York!  What happened to Metropolis or Gotham?), where the Phantom Stranger pays a visit to a somewhat Lex Luthor-looking fellow named Broderick Rune.  Interestingly, Rune doesn’t react the way most do when they see the Stranger, instead seeming positively pleased to see him, and as the mysterious wanderer steps into the man’s penthouse apartment, we see why.  Suddenly, the Spectral Sleuth is caught in a glowing pentagram, and “sorcerous fumes” knock him out!

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A Hindu servant named Rashid arrives and we discover that this is all part of a plan, just as the wealthy rune topples over from what is described as “the final attack.”  Both the Stranger and his captor are rushed to a private hospital, where a hesitant doctor performs a bizarre transplant, stealing the Ghostly Gumshoe’s immortal heart and giving it to the ruthless Mr. Rune.  The procedure is a success, but while under, Rune dreams that he is confronted by the Stranger, who demands the return of what is his.  There’s a nice little back and forth about the importance of a soul above all else that is reminescent of Christ’s question, For what shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?” 

 

When Rune awakens, he is panicked, but things continue to get more bizarre!  Two thugs trying to dispose of the Spectral Sleuth’s body, only to discover their bag is empty when they try to dump it.  Just then, the Stranger appears behind them, and shock of the confrontation shatters their minds!  Meanwhile, Rune recovers, but he is plagued by visions of his mysterious adversary.  Finally, he decides to try and escape his guilt by heading to a castle in Europe.

 

the phantom stranger (1969) 14 - 15This gambit seems to have worked for a time, but on another stormy night, Rune once again sees the Stranger stalking out of the darkness.  In desperation, his servant, Rashid, who had originally trapped the mysterious hero, tries to conjure another spell to banish his spirit.  Unfortunately, his power is not up to the task, and in the midst of his incantations, the Stranger appears!  Despite the loyal Hindu’s desperate efforts, when Rune flees out into the storm, the Spectral Sleuth follows, and the stolen heart stops beating!  Finally, Rune’s allies find him, dead, and lacking a heart!

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This is a really good Phantom Stranger story, taking full advantage of the mysterious nature of the character and supernatural trappings of the setting.  You can ask questions about how the Stranger’s heart was able to be taken in the first place, but given the way things worked out, I’m rather inclined to think that this undertaking was always intended to end like this.  The story tackles rather similar themes of guilt and conscience as the Edgar Allen Poe classic, “The Tell-Tale Heart,” with its protagonist who is slowly driven to desperation by the knowledge of his crime.

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Like Poe’s own brand of Gothic horror, this tale is wonderfully atmospheric, with menacing oozing from every panel, and the oppressive threat of outer night seeming to press against every scene.  Aparo’s art is fantastic, bringing Rune’s selfish self-confidence to life, as well as his growing terror.  The looming menace of the Stranger is wonderfully rendered as well, and our mysterious hero has rarely scarier.  It’s short, but tightly plotted and effective.  I’ll give it 4.5 Minutemen, an excellent supernatural thriller.

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“The Spectre of the Stalking Swamp”


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Our Dr. Thirteen backup sadly doesn’t live up to our wonderful cover either.  It presents a rather unusual tale for the Good Doctor, though it is also a pretty entertaining one.  It starts in the swamp, right enough, with a young couple out for a walk.  The youthful Romeo’s efforts are interrupted by a strange sight, a green monster arising out of the swamp! The creature scoops up the frightened girl and carries her off into the murk.  The next day, the local sheriff, Rufus Taylor, explains the mystery to Dr. Thirteen.

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The boy who witnessed the abduction is now comatose from shock, but he and the girl are not the only victims of this monster.  Apparently people have been disappearing for weeks.  According to local legend, a hundred years ago a settler got separated from his family and wandered off into the swamp, where the essence of the bog infused his body, turning him into the specter that haunts the silent spaces.  Thirteen, of course, is having none of this, and he insists on going out into the wild to investigate.

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That night, the monster attacks his boat, and the Ghost Breaker disappears, apparently broken himself!  Despite his strict orders, his wife follows him, persuading the sheriff to help her, and they find the doctor’s boat.  Maria manages to convince Rufus to continue the search, even though he insists it’s hopeless, and they stumble upon a strange sight deep in the swamp, a gleaming domed city. Finding their way inside, the pair discover the populace moving like zombies, blank-eyed and listless.

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Upon a throne in the city’s center, the encounter the swamp monster, actually a man called Professor Zachary Nail, who is wearing a suit designed for “protection against the filth outside–the polution that infects your dying world!”  Nail has created his own Eden in the swamp and kidnapped the locals to populate it.  When the sheriff bravely tries to capture the madman, the Professor shots him with a bizarre ray, which converts the lawman into a plant!  Shades of Batman: TAS!

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Nail takes the terrified Mrs. Thirteen for a tour of his city, explaining that the place is powered by a nuclear reactor (!), and that he has hypnotically controlled the populace so that they are utterly subject to his will.  He then leads her to her husband, who is also under his power.  The Professor orders Dr. Thirteen to take his wife to the “Submission Room” (which doesn’t sound too pleasant), but the strong-willed Ghost Breaker resists his control.  In an overly written sequence, Thirteen throws off the brainwashing and attacks Nail.

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Just then, the foliage of the swamp starts growing exponentially and begins to smash the dome.  The Professor runs off in an attempt to save his Eden, but the Thirteens have better sense and begin to evacuate the place.  They get the placid populace out just in time, as the vegetation of the wilds reclaim the city, destroying it utterly.  Know-it-all Dr. Thirteen theorizes that the waste from nuclear reactor must have caused the plants to grow super fast, but Maria thinks maybe Mother Nature was exacting her revenge “for the crimes he committed in her name!”

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This is a solid and entertaining story, if quite rushed.  It is not, however, really a Dr. Thirteen-style story.  This character is best suited by relatively conventional mysteries with exceptional or sensational trappings, and this type of science fiction yarn is a little out of his wheelhouse.  He doesn’t even really solve the mystery here.  The villain just captures him and conveniently explains his plans.  The actual plot is an interesting one, and the eco-terrorist villain archetype is one that will emerge more often in the future, most notably when R’as Al Ghul is given his chance to shine in future issues.  Clearly the concept of radical action on environmental issues was in the zeitgeist, which is interesting.  I rather thought the spread of such characters was a more recent development.

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Poor Sheriff Rufus, despite looking the part, surprisingly didn’t conform to the usual trope of the small-town Southern sheriff.  These characters in fiction tend to fat, incompetent, and corrupt.  Rufus, on the other hand, was brave and apparently honest and dedicated, even losing his life trying to perform his duties.  I’m so used to the tropes that I was surprised by this.  We can give credit to DeZuniga and Wein for subverting expectations there.  Wein, for his part, is a bit overly purple in his prose, especially in his narration, throughout, but the writing isn’t bad.  On the art front, Tony DeZuniga does a solid job, and some of his character work is really quite good.  We don’t really get a good sense of the city, though, which might have more to do with the lack of space than anything else.  His design for the swamp monster is effective considering what we eventually learn of it, but it certainly isn’t as cool as Adams’ cover version, sadly.  On the whole, I feel like his style is a good fit for these types of horror/suspense comics.  So, all-in-all, I suppose I’ll give this rather cramped and odd tale 3 Minutemen.  It’s enjoyable but forgettable.

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P.S.: Notably, I think that this concept of a futuristic city hidden in the swamp will be recycled in the first Swamp Thing run, though I can’t remember which issue.  That run, of course, was begun by Len Wein, for a bit of synchronicity.

 


Eco-terrorists, Chinese demons, and energy beings, oh my!  A fun set of books, these, and I had a good time going through them.  There is certainly plenty creativity in this batch, whatever their quality.  I hope that y’all enjoyed reading my commentaries and that y’all will join me again soon for another edition of Into the Bronze Age!  Next post, we close out August 1971!  Be there, or Mother Box will be disappointed!  Until next time, keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

 

Into the Bronze Age: August 1971 (Part 3)

DC-Style-Guide-1

Welcome to another edition of Into the Bronze Age!  We’ve got a really famous comic on the docket for this post, or perhaps it might be more accurate to say that it is infamous.  I’m speaking, of course, about the drug issue of Green Lantern/Green Arrow.  I can’t say I’ve been looking forward to reading this one again, but it should certainly prove an interesting subject for study and reflection. First, a little background.

Green Lantern/Green Arrow #85 is, without a doubt, the most famous issue of this famous run, and justifiably so.  Whatever it’s quality, this issue arrived like a thunderclap, and it became massively influential.  Interestingly, the origins of this tale lie, not in the offices of DC, but in the Marvel Bullpen.  You see, in 1970, the drug epidemic was a major concern, and the Nixon administration asked Stan Lee to publish an anti-drug story.  The Marvel editor chose to do so in The Amazing Spider-Man #96-98 in 1971, leading to the first comic since the advent of the Comics Code Authority to depict drug use, which was not allowed, even in a negative light, under the Code.  This caused a minor furor, and the folks at the Code refused to sign off on the issues, so Lee published them anyway, removing the Code seals.  This was an important moment in comics and especially in the growth of maturity in the medium.  When Denny O’Neil and Neal Adams came to tackle their own treatment of the drug problem (because where one of the Big Two goes, the other inevitably follows), the powers that be at the Code reevaluated the matter and approved the issues.  The rest, as they say, is history and led to the gradual loosening of Code restrictions.  Thus, this issue had an impact on the superhero genre at large, as well as its immediate cultural influence.

Of course, we can’t let that comic completely overshadow our other classic books, which include a solid issue of the Flash and another of JLA/JSA crossover, which is always a blast.  So, we’ve got plenty to cover in this post!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #403
  • Adventure Comics #409
  • Batman #233 (Reprints)
  • Batman #234
  • Detective Comics #414
  • The Flash #208
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #85 (the infamous drug issue)
  • Justice League of America #91
  • Mr. Miracle #3
  • The Phantom Stranger #14
  • Superman #241
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #112
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #138
  • Teen Titans #34
  • World’s Finest #204

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


The Flash #208


The_Flash_Vol_1_208

“A Kind of Miracle in Central City”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Editor: Julius Schwartz

“Malice in Wonderland”
Writer: Len Wein
Penciler: Dick Giordano
Inker: Dick Giordano
Editor: Julius Schwartz

“Flash’s Sensational Risk”
Writer: John Broome
Penciler: Carmine Infantino
Inker: Joe Giella
Editor: Julius Schwartz

We’ve got a rather off-beat Flash tale this month,  though it has some similarities to the themes of an earlier issue in this run.  This comic has an equally unusual cover, with its scene of piety and the seemingly providential arrival of the Flash.  It’s not the most arresting of images, but it is unique enough to catch your attention if you actually take a moment to figure out the story it tells.  It’s not a particularly great piece, but it is certainly fitting for the tale within.  That particular yarn begins with a group of teens bearing an offering of stolen goods to an abandoned church, only to be greeted by an unlikely trio of gunmen.

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They’re dressed like refugees from the 19th Century, with one a Yankee soldier, one a Confederate cavalryman, and the leader an Indian brave.  I’ve always got a soft-spot for gangs in themed costumes, but I’m not really sure how this gimmick fits these small-time hoods.  At least it’s better than another appearance of the Generic Gang, I suppose.  Either way, as they gather their ill-gotten gains, a troop of nuns march into the crumbling edifice and confront them.  One of the sisters pleads with her actual brother, the leader of the teens, to stop the thieves, but he rejects her.  Fittingly when dealing with such unrepentant rogues, the sisters bow and begin to pray to St. Jude, the patron saint of hopeless causes (the concept of which appeals to my Romantic sensibilities).

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While the nuns can’t convince the thieves to change their ways, they at least drive them out of their hideout, but while meeting on the top of a building, the larcenous louses decide that someone must have tipped the sisters off to their location.  Who could be a better suspect than the brother of one of those sisters?  So, the thugs toss young Vic right off of the roof when he asks for his payment!  Meanwhile, the Flash is on his way back from Istanbul and makes a small but significant mistake.  He forgets that it is Saturday and heads to the office, only then realizing his error and heading home, which brings him by that building at the exact moment Vic makes his precipitous exit.  The Sultan of Speed whips up an updraft to break the kid’s fall, but inexplicably (and unnecessarily), “electromagnetic interference” somehow messes up his efforts…which consist of wind…somehow.  Nonetheless, the Scarlet Speedster saves the boy,  but the youth won’t tell him anything.

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This leads to a fun scene where Barry ponders how to help the kid, realizing that saving the world is important, but so is saving one misguided teenager.  As he thinks, he paces, unconsciously zipping from one end of the world to another, and we get a glimpse of how tumultuous the world was in 1971, with protests from Japan to Paris.  Having made his decision, the Flash zooms back home, only to find Vic having come to his senses and gone to his sister for help.

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Clearly these scenes represent some issues which don’t make our history recaps but were in the zeitgeist at the time.

The Fastest Man Alive overhears him confess and add that the kids want to give back the stolen goods, but they can’t find the gang’s new hiding place.  So the Monarch of Motion takes a hand.  He conducts a super speed grid search of the city, locates the loot, and then races past Vic and his girl, pulling them along in his slipstream right to the cave where the spoils lie.

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Unfortunately, they aren’t the only visitors.  Their anachronistic antagonists make an appearance as well, but the invisibly vibrating Flash jumps in again, swatting their bullets out of the air and lending an super-speed hand to Vic’s desperate fight against his foes.  I enjoy the touch of characterization this provides Barry, as he doesn’t need the glory from this deed, preferring to give the kid something to make him proud.  Later, the teens are granted leniency by a judge, and the nuns host a social at their renovated church.  Vic, for his part, is convinced that the strange events that led to this happy ending were a miracle.  Flash notes that it was the miracle of super speed, but we see a caption that quotes Dylan Thomas, saying that, to those who believe, “the moment of a miracle is like unending lightning.”

 

I like the light touch of religious themes in this story, with the whole tale having the appearance of a fairly straightforward superhero adventure, with the Flash as the usual arbiter of justice and redemption.  Yet, there is the admirably subtle twist of our hero’s wrong turn at the beginning of the story that brings him into contact with the lost soul in need of rescue, a wrong turn that is easily explained as just a random occurrence but which takes on greater meaning in the context of a story filled with prayer and faith.

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The yarn is nothing special, but Kanigher does a good job with suggesting the possibility of divine intervention.  The final quote makes that subtle connection stronger, but it is rather deeply and unintentionally ironic.  You see, that line comes from Dylan Thomas’s “On the Marriage of a Virgin,” which describes a sexual experience of a virgin, probably that of Mary, the mother of Jesus, in contrast with her experience with the Holy Spirit.  That makes its use here an…odd choice.  The line, taken out of context, works pretty well, but its context certainly provides a weird perspective on the story!  Nonetheless, it’s an entertaining read, and Dick Giordano does a solid job on the art, really acing the secret super-speed confrontation with the villains at the end.  The thieving kids’ arc is probably the biggest weakness of this issue, as it feels like it is missing something.  With all of the costumed criminals constantly talking about “The big man,” the tale feels rather unfinished when it ends without some type of reveal or resolution involving this big time baddie that supposedly is running things.  I found myself wondering if I had missed a few pages when I got to the end. Nonetheless, I’ll give the whole thing an above average 3.5 Minutemen based on the strength of its themes.

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“Malice in Wonderland”


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Despite how much I enjoyed the religious themes of the cover story, I have to say that my favorite part of this book was this delightful Elongated Man backup.  Like many of Ralph Dibny’s adventures I’ve been able to read, this one is just plain fun.  It begins in rather unusual fashion, with our unhurried hero stopping off at a small town named Dodgson, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in a rather unique way
Apparently the festival is, oddly enough, Alice in Wonderland themed because the town’s founder was a descendant of Lewis Carroll, and a costumed ‘Alice’ gives the visiting detective a free copy of the children’s classic, which he decides to read in the pack.  As he relaxes in that idyllic setting, reliving his childhood and admiring the original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel, which provide the official aesthetic for the town’s celebration, he is startled to see a running rabbit, late for a very important date!
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Of course, no self-respecting detective could pass up such an odd occurrence, so Ralph hurries off after the harried hare.  Before he can catch up, the White Rabbit hops into a cab and speeds away.  Using his stretching powers, the Elongated Man is able to pursue the rogue rodent through the town for a while before losing him, but after an informative conversation with a helpful ‘Mad Hatter,’ the Ductile Detective follows a hint and heads to the library, where a first edition of Alice is on display.
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Flash208-22Sure enough, the hunch pays off, and the hare is there.  When the bold bunny sees the superhero arrive, he calls out to another costumed character, who tosses down a smoke bomb.  Together the two steal the valuable tome while Ralph and the townsfolk take an impromptu nap.  Upon awakening, the Ductile Detective deduces where the thieves will be hiding, from a scrap of paper he snatched from the rabbit.  The notes reads “Mushroom Float,” and the hero realizes that the crooks plan to make their escape in plain sight, by hiding out among the costumed cast of the town’s anniversary parade!
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Meanwhile, those same thieves are slowly winding through town aboard, you guessed it, a float of the hookah-smoking caterpillar atop his mushroom.  As they congratulate themselves on their cleverness, an arm suddenly stretches out of the caterpillar’s hookah and snatches their loot.  The criminals draw weapons, but the wildly stretching sleuth proves too hard to hit.
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There’s some really fun (and funny) action in this scene, as when the villains try to smother our hero by shoving his head into the smoke from the hookah, only to have him stretch his nose free of the cloud, all while stretching a foot around the float to give his opponents the boot!  With the criminals corralled, Ralph explains what originally tipped him off about the rogue rabbit.  The town’s celebration was based on Tenniel’s illustrations, but the ignorant thief had based his costume on the Disney movie, making him look out of place.  This set the detective’s ‘mystery loving nose’ to twitching.  There’s a lesson in there for you, kids: Don’t just see the movie; read the book!
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This is just a charming little adventure.  It’s a lot of fun, and Ralph is entertaining throughout, both in dialog and in his wacky stretching.  Dick Giordano’s art is great in this tale, really doing a wonderful job with the whimsical world that best suits Ralph and his exploits.  All of the colorful costumed characters look great, though they also don’t really look like people wearing costumes.  Still, Giordano does a really good job with the final fight, providing entertaining and creative uses of his hero’s powers, which is always important for a stretching character.  There’s not much to this story, but Len Wein manages to make it feel complete in just eight pages, which is always a challenge.  I’ll give this whimsical little visit to Wonderland a thoroughly entertaining 4 Minutemen.
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Green Lantern / Green Arrow #85


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“Snowbirds Don’t Fly”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: Neal Adams
Inker: Neal Adams
Colourist: Cory Adams
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Julius Schwartz

Here we are at last.  I’ve been talking about this comic since we began the GL/GA series.  Of course, I’ve been dreading rereading this issue.  I  rather cordially disliked it upon my first read, finding it massively heavy-handed and generally goofy and melodramatic.  Imagine my surprise when, upon begrudgingly rereading the comic (the things I do for you, my beloved readers!), I found the story much better than I remembered.  It’s certainly not perfect, but it’s far from the worst issue of this run, and it is undeniably important and groundbreaking.  So, without further ado, let’s examine this landmark issue.

First, I’d be remiss not to talk about this justly famous cover.  It’s not exactly subtle (what in this run is?), but it is immediately arresting.  Can you imagine browsing through the newsstand, seeing the collection of fine and conventional covers of this month’s books arrayed in front of you, only to have this piece jump out.  It had to be an incredible shock to audiences back in 1971.  I’d say that this is one of the few cases where cover dialog or copy is absolutely necessary.  I think a little context, at least in 1971, was probably called for.  The central image, of Speedy strung out, shaking, hunched and ashamed, is really a powerful one, though Ollie’s reaction might be a bit exaggerated to the point of being comical.  The overall effect is certainly gripping, nonetheless.

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The legendary story this cover represents had to be even more shocking to fans.  It begins with the conventional scene of a mugging, but unusually, these muggers are uncertain and possessed of a strange desperation.  Unfortunately for them, they pick Oliver Queen as their pigeon, which goes about as well as you might imagine.  Apparently, Dinah has broken things off with Ollie (maybe that fight last issue was more serious than it seemed?), and he’s got a bit of aggression to work out.  Things take a turn for the serious, however, when one of the muggers pulls out a crossbow of all things!  Oddly, the guy who uses a bow and arrow as a superhero mocks the weapon and doesn’t take it seriously, which makes the quarrel that embeds itself in his chest all the more surprising!

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In a modern day reimagining of the beginning of the Good Samaritan parable, the badly wounded hero crawls through the streets in search of aid…and is promptly ignored by a well-dressed couple, a cop (!), a taxi, and even the nurse at the emergency room…at least until he keels over.  It’s an effective little commentary on the dehumanizing affect of urban life.  After all, we’re only six years after the murder of Kitty Genovese.  Once he’s patched up, Ollie checks out the quarrel and notices that it is rather familiar and, on a hunch, he calls up Hal Jordan for some backup.  When the Green Lantern arrives, Ollie suits up and admits to his friend that the quarrel has him worried because he hasn’t seen Speedy in a month, and it could have come from his wayward ward.

 

green lantern 085 011The heroes begin their investigation in the basement of Ollie’s own building, where he’d seen the kids who jumped him before.  Downstairs they find one of the punks begging a charming fellow named Browden for a fix.  It seems that Browden is a pusher!  He turns away the junkie with a savage kick, and the partners decide to ask the jerk some questions.  The guy proves suicidally brave, taking on two Justice Leaguers with a fire axe, but surprisingly this doesn’t prove to be the best idea.  After capturing both the drug dealer and his client, the heroes plan to interrogate their prisoners.

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Next, we get a scene that I found cringe-inducingly bad when I read it the first time.  I found it much more palatable this time, but there’s still plenty here that is on the silly side.  We join our other two would-be muggers in an apartment in China Town, and they are suffering from withdrawal.  To take their minds off their pain, they admire a wall of ancient weapons, the source of the nearly deadly crossbow.  One of the boys is an Asian American, and he mentions that the weapons are his fathers, who collects them as an outlet against the injustice that he has to deal with day in and day out as a minority.  This leads to their discussions about why they are using drugs, and the dialog is a bit goofy, but there is something worthwhile here as well, though I didn’t appreciate it on my first reading.

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What…what is that kid doing in the last panel?  Interpretive dance?

The scene is ham-handed, and in it O’Neil commits a cardinal sin of writing, having his characters simply declare how they feel, rather than delivering that information organically.  Despite the clunky and, at times, ridiculous dialog where these characters just helpfully hold forth about their motivations and feelings, O’Neil links their drug use to the racial issues of the time.  While his connections are wildly overly simplistic, effectively equating to “I use drugs because people are racist,” there’s no denying that there was and is a disproportionate percentage of addiction in minority communities in the U.S..  This is tied into a host of other social ills, but it’s noteworthy that O’Neil makes the connection and gives us a sympathetic portrayal, not only of addicts, but of minorities as well, identifying the social pressures that play a role in their problems.

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green lantern 085 016Their group-therapy session is interrupted by the arrival of the Green Team, who fly in and capture the fleeing kids, only to be surprised to see that one of them is…Speedy?!  Ollie instantly assumes that his ward is there undercover, and when one of the junkies helpfully offers to take the heroes to their suppliers, Arrow tells his young friend to stay behind while they wrap things up.  On the way, the heroes talk with the kids, and in a notable inversion, it is the Emerald Archer who is the inflexible, judgemental one, while Hal takes a more thoughtful, moderate approach.  It seems that Ollie has no patience for the kind of weakness that leads to drug use.

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Another Headcount entry!

When they reach their destination, a private airport, the Emerald Gladiator quickly disarms the smugglers operating there, but then he falls prey to that perennial superhero foe…the headblow!  One of the junkies unsurprisingly turns on the heroes and clocks the Lantern with a wrench!  His green-clad partner does his best, but the wounded Archer is quickly beaten down, and instead of killing the helpless heroes, the smugglers decide to dope them up and leave them for the cops.  The addicts get a fix for their efforts, and as the cops arrive, it seem that the Green Team is doomed for disgrace and jail!  Just then,  Speedy arrives and manages to rouse Hal, who unsteadily tries to use his ring to escape.

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His efforts result in a monstrously distorted construct produced by his drug-addled imagination, but the Emerald Crusader wasn’t chosen to wield the most powerful weapon in the universe for nothing.  Hal summons all of his willpower and manages to focus enough to get them away.  It’s actually a really good sequence, and I love that Hal is portrayed as having enough iron willpower to overcome even the drugs in his system this way, however unrealistic it might be.

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Back at Green Arrow’s apartment, the heroes recover and discuss what would lead someone to put that kind of poison into their body.  Roy quietly offers a suspiciously specific example about a young boy ignored by a father figure and turning to drugs for comfort, but his mentor simply shrugs it off.  After Hal leaves, Ollie walks back into his rooms, only to discover Speedy in the process of shooting up!

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green lantern 085 029The reveal is, of course, not that surprising after the cover, but the twist of an honest-to-goodness superhero, not just a supporting character, becoming a drug-addict, must have been earth-shattering to fans in ’71, especially at DC.  We’re still not very far removed from the era where DC heroes were spotless, flawless paragons of all virtues, and this is a huge departure from the line’s conventions.  You simply didn’t see things like this in comics, especially DC Comics.  This makes the issue itself an important milestone, in many ways representing the high-water mark of social relevance for the era.

The portrayal of DC heroes as fallible was amped up by an order of magnitude with this story, for better or worse, and not just with Speedy’s succumbing to heroin.  No, the moral culpability of Oliver Queen shouldn’t be overlooked.  This is actually one of my biggest problems with this comic.  O’Neil does here what often happens with such “nothing will ever be the same” twists: he tells a massively disruptive story, revealing a huge change in the characters, but with no plans to follow it up or manage the fallout from it.  Thus, these two issues will go on to haunt poor Speedy for the rest of his comics career.  Hardly a story will be written about him that won’t be affected in some fashion by this choice, and while Ollie isn’t as marred by these comics as his poor ward, the character is marked by his cavalier irresponsibility towards the kid that was effectively his son, which helped lead to this moment.  These factors make this tale a pretty grave disservice to these characters.  As bad as the incredibly self-righteous, Godwin’s Law invoking Green Arrow of the earlier run might have been, this twist, which turns him into an incredibly selfish, irresponsible jerk is significantly worse.

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Translation: ‘I should not be allowed to care for a kid.’

Despite this, the story itself is significantly better than I remember, and there is a good tale to be found here, with the examination of drug use and the damage it causes, as well as the desperation of those caught in the claws of addiction.  Unfortunately, the dialog of the junkies is more than a little silly at times, and the characterization problems, with both Ollie’s selfishness and Speedy’s rather weak reasons for his drug use seriously impacting the overall effect.  Apparently Roy was abandoned by his father figure…while he was in college.  At that point, you’d think he’d be able to handle it.  A lot of kids go off to college and don’t see their parents for months at a time.  I certainly did.  So, his motivations seem a bit insufficient, and this portrayal also contrasts rather noticeably with the happy, well-adjusted kid concurrently appearing in Teen Titans.  A little more groundwork would have gone a long way to making this tale more successful.

Despite these weaknesses, seeing this comic in the context, both of its preceding run and of the rest of the DC line at the time, is really revelatory.  In that light, it becomes apparent that is the culmination of much of O’Neil’s work on this book.  In it, the major themes of O’Neil’s social relevance campaign come together in a surprisingly sophisticated (for its time and medium) combination that illustrates a compassionate understanding of the drug problem that is often still lacking today.  It is clumsy in places, clever in places, poorly thought-out, yet innovative and daring.  The issue is helped greatly by Neal Adams’ beautiful, realistic art.  It elevates the material and adds a touch of humanity to the characters whose suffering and struggles might otherwise not have nearly as much weight.  This flawed comic is definitely worth a read if you want to understand both its era and Bronze Age comics at large.  I’ll give it 4 Minutemen, certainly a higher score than I expected to award, but it is definitely hurt by O’Neil’s abuse of his characters.