Into the Bronze Age: May 1971 (Part 6)

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Hello Internet travelers, and welcome to the final edition of Into the Bronze Age for May, 1971!  We’ve got three tales to finish out the month, and though quality varies, there’s plenty here to enjoy.  I hope that all of my readers are safe and sound, having escaped from the various disasters plaguing us at the moment.  Speaking of escapes, let’s do just that, find our way to a world full of heroes and find solace in the fantastic and the wondrous!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #400
  • Adventure Comics #406
  • Batman #231
  • Brave and Bold #95
  • Detective Comics #411
  • The Flash #206
  • Forever People #2
  • G.I. Combat #147
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #83
  • Justice League of America #89
  • New Gods #2
  • Superman #237
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #110
  • World’s Finest #202

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #110


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“Indian Death Charge!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Werner Roth
Inker: Vince Colletta
Cover Artist: Dick Giordano

“The Face of Fate”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

Well, we’ve got quite a cover on this month’s Lois Lane issue.  I…hardly know where to begin.  It’s beautifully drawn by Dick Giordano, but it certainly is unusual.  Lois protecting a Native American baby is one thing, that getup is something else.  It really is a pretty striking image, with a crowd of angry white faces threatening in the background, even throwing rocks.  Given the attitudes about racial mixing that still exist today, you can imagine what it might have been like in 1971, seeing a white woman with an Indian baby, claiming it as her own.  The ridiculous elements of the image aside, it still probably created something of a stir.

The story within seems an obvious attempt by Kanigher to capitalize on his success with his previous excellent racial story.  Sadly, this one isn’t nearly as good. It begins in a similar way, with Lois pursuing a feature in the ghetto of Metropolis, where she is interviewing candidates for the Daily Planet’s “Mother of the Year” contest.  Yet, just as in the previous book, she is rebuffed by the natives of the place, though this time not because of her race.  Instead, a mother rather unkindly attacks the reporter because she is not a mother and so is unfit to pick one.

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The career-minded Lois replies with biting sarcasm and flippant wit…oh wait, no, she is immediately consumed by an existential crisis because a stranger pointed out she doesn’t have children, and she weakly tells Clark that she would have a family, if only Superman would marry her.  This little scene bothered me a bit, though I suppose I should have expected it.  I want Lois to be the confident, self-assured woman we’ve been getting glimpses of lately, and this seemed a bit weak for her.  Nonetheless, she begs off the story with Perry and is sent to cover a Pueblo Indians rain dance on a reservation in the west, with Clark along to cover the same story for TV.

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ll110_07While there, we get a cross-section of the tourists, all saying various terrible things, which sets the tone for the encounter.  The Pueblo tribesmen declare that they won’t hold the dance, as it is a religious ceremony and not a circus.  The crowd gets ugly, and Superman has to intervene to prevent a riot.  He whips up a dust storm to blind and separate the crowds, and while he is working, Lois tries to help a young Indian mother get her child to safety, but the girl declares “My baby must learn to expect hurt from the white man!”  Wow!  Yeah, no-one in this country has gotten a worse deal than the Native Americans, but I’d still say that doesn’t exactly make her mother of the year material, what with the willful endangerment of her infant and all!

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As the crowds break up, Lois follows the Pueblo people, offering to help.  They refuse her aid, but let her accompany them, telling their story.  It is a sadly familiar tale of exploitation and corruption, the eradication of the buffalo herds and the theft of land, but it has a particular wrinkle.  The Indian leader, Johnny Lone Eagle, shows the reporter a dam being constructed that threatens to flood their village.  What’s worse, the dam isn’t fated to provide power to a city or anything so useful or productive.  No, it’s only going to create a lake for a rich man’s fishing preserve.

The Pueblo tribesmen plan to attack and dynamite the dam, risking their lives, women and children too, to protect their homes.  Lois observes their war dance the night before the attack, but convinces their leader to let her report the story….with smoke signals.  Oookay.  That’s a bit much, and it rather undercuts the seriousness of the story.  A little later on, the young Indian mother, Singing Rain, is discovered laying on the ground, apparently badly injured, though she looks more like she just can’t be bothered to get up.

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Deathly ill or just mildly annoyed?

On the morning of the showdown, the Indians and the construction workers face off, about to come to blows, when Superman scoops up the entire dam, angry crowds in tow, and drops it into a mountain valley, quickly shaping the place into a replacement pond with super strength, and thus solving the problem.

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Yet, Singing Rain has apparently worsened, and she dies, but not before giving her baby son to Lois to raise as her own.  Lois is touched and promises to care for ‘Little Moon,’ though no-one, white or red, is happy about it.  We see her happily taking care of the little tyke, but things take a turn when a sleazy publisher who would give even J. Jonah Jameson pause tries to get her to sell the rights of her story.  When she refuses, the fellow twists the facts, claiming she approached him, and soon the foster mother finds herself the center of competing protests.

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Shortly thereafter, Lois is driving when she is forced off of a bridge!  In other words, it’s a Tuesday.  She and the baby plunge into a river, and though the reporter finds herself trapped, she desperately pushes the child to the surface, only to be rescued at the last moment by a Native American soldier.  She awakens in the hospital to find Joseph Bright Wing, Little Moon’s father, who was missing in Vietnam.  He was in the truck which sent her careening off the bridge, on his way home, having escaped from a V.C. prisoner of war camp.

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He thanks the girl reporter for caring for his son and notes that she almost gave her life for the boy.  She bids Little Moon a tearful farewell, and the story ends with an unexpected ceremony, wherein Lois Lane is surprisingly selected as the Daily Planet’s (foster) mother of the year.  Yet, one moron in the crowd can’t keep his mouth shut, and he calls out that she’s color-blind, caring for an Indian baby.  We get a real clunker in  her reply, as Lois answers back that: “It’s you who are blind!  My heart and Little Moon’s are the same color!”

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It’s…an unsatisfying conclusion, really.  Superman snaps his super fingers and solves the racial conflict, giving both sides what they want, despite the fact that the sides were not equal in merit.  The trouble is that the rich jerk who was willing to flood an entire village so he could take a private fishing holiday didn’t deserve to get what he wanted.  I’d have rather seen some of the social justice-oriented Superman we glimpsed in O’Neil’s run, smashing the dam and changing hearts, not just placating the bullies pushing around the little guys.  The ending to Lois’s plot is okay, but just packed full of convenience.  It’s positively deus ex machina.  She happens to run off the road right in front of the child’s father, who just happened to be coming home from Vietnam at that exact moment.  Kanigher is clearly trying to recreate the magic of the previous story’s powerful ending with their hospital room meeting, but this one just doesn’t come together naturally or effectively.

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This issue has a great message about the humanity and dignity of America’s abused native population and about the insignificance of racial difference, but they are rather lost in the shuffle of competing elements.  This comic ups the drama and the stakes compared to the previous tale of this type, but it moves too far too quickly.  There was something remarkably realistic, despite the fantastic trappings, in the previous yarn.  This one tries to cram a bit too much into the plot, leaving too little room for pathos.  Instead, it descends to bathos.  Yet, Kanigher’s heart is certainly in the right place, and it is interesting to see him focus on native peoples and the continuing themes of racial divisions.  Perhaps the most striking thing about this issue is the blatant racism on display in many of the background characters, an ugliness that is treated pretty straight-forwardly.  It’s surprising and arresting.

As for Roth’s art, for the most part it is beautiful and detailed, as it usually is.  I’m still really enjoying his tenure on this book, but there are a few moments where his work fails in its storytelling duties, as when the supposedly injured Singing Rain looks more like she’s mildly perturbed rather than desperately hurt.  Still, Roth fills the book with interesting and detailed faces and delivers some solid emotional work throughout.  All things considered, I’ll give this ambitious but rather flawed issue 2.5 Minutemen.  It just doesn’t manage to capture either the quiet dignity or the gentle impact of Kanigher’s previous effort.

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“The Face of Fate”


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Topping off this issue is another Kanigher-penned tale, the continuation of his Rose and Thorn feature.  This one picks up where the last left off, with the titular Thorn haunted by the spirit of a wronged woman that wants vengeance in order to find its peace.  The plea for revenge has found the right type of audience, and the next night, the Thorn sets out to find the girl’s killer, Albert Talbot, and bring him to justice!  On her nightly prowl, the female fury finds her boyfriend, Detective Danny Stone, getting his head handed to him by a pack of 100 thugs.  It’s just possible that Stone is really bad at his job given how often she has to rescue him!

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The Baleful Beauty comes on like Gang Busters and takes out the gunsels, only to discover that Stone’s sister may be following in her ghostly guide’s footsteps, falling for the charms and hollow promises of her target!  This is…a bit convenient and an unnecessary complication.  However, because the supernatural is involved, you could hand-wave it as the workings of fate.  A bit of dialog drawing attention to this fact would have gone a long way, however.

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Following the slightly dented detective’s lead, the Nymph of Night manages to locate Talbot’s estate/hideout, and she scales the fence, taking out a pack of dogs and then a passel of guards with various trick thorns in a rather nice looking set of sequences.  Finally, the Vixen of Vengeance earns her name by facing down the felonious fiend who murdered poor Selena.

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Talbot has taken Detective Stone’s sister hostage, but as he threatens her with a candelabra, he unwittingly sets the drapes alight in his panic, setting the whole house ablaze in no-time.  The Thorn saves the foolish girl, but she is unwilling to let even such a despicable lout as Talbot meet his fate in a fire, so she rushes in to save him as well.  She succeeds, pulling him from the flames, but he is horribly burned, meeting a similar fate as his victim.  To add ironic salt to his wounds, the Baleful Beauty leaves him the same mask worn by Selena years ago.  When she returns home that morning, the Thorn sees Selena’s spirit fade away, finally able to find peace.

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This is a brief and absolutely packed story!  It’s actually pretty good, which adds to my growing impression that Kanigher was actually best in small doses.  He really crams plot into these few pages, and though he over does it a bit, the end result is a pretty solid tale of vengeance. The final showdown is rapid-fire but quite dramatic, and the irony of the ending is pretty effective.  The villain meets a fairly grisly fate, and this type of approach to justice continues to set this feature apart from the rest of the DCU.  It’s rather refreshing to find a tale like this as the exception, rather than the rule in a superhero universe!  There are some slightly clunky elements, as with the random element of Stone’s sister and history repeating itself, but she does add to the tension in the final scene and add a bit more urgency to the plot.  I’m actually a bit surprised that Kanigher wrapped this arc up in just two issues.  I rather expected it to have a bit more buildup, and it may have benefited from such.  Nonetheless, the final effect was pretty solid, and Rose and Thorn continues to be a strong feature.  I’ll give this outing 3.5 Minutemen.

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World’s Finest #202


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“Vengeance of the Tomb-Thing!”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella
Editors: Julius Schwartz and E. Nelson Bridwell
Cover Artists: Neal Adams and Dick Giordano

Rounding out the month of May, we’ve got another adventure of the world’s finest team, and it’s a fairly solid one.  We’ve got a wonderfully dynamic cover with the two super-friends locked in deadly combat.  The strange enthroned figure behind them looks suitably alien, though the featureless orb isn’t as menacing as it might be.  I’m reminded a bit of the titular Robot Monster.  The cover text boldly proclaims that this image is not a cheat, which is certainly intriguing.  It’s a beautifully illustrated composition, which makes the opening splash page of the book, which largely recreates it, a tad disappointing.  Dick Dillin is a fine artist, but comparing his work to Neal Adams’ is a losing proposition in my book.

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The actual tale begins with a stormy night over a distant Middle Eastern desert, where a familiar flying red and blue form is struck by lightning, and, strangely, knocked out of the sky by the bolt!  A gang of desert bandits hear the impact and are soon astounded when Superman walks out of the rain and into their camp.  Even more amazing, the Man of Steel seems to have lost his memory, and the bandit leader, ‘Bedouin Brakh,’ decides to use the confused hero to forward his own nefarious goals.

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The next day finds Lois Lane (of course) covering a nearby archeological dig of the tomb of ‘King Malis,’ (I bet he was a real nice guy) when they are suddenly attacked by bandits.  The archeologists take a page from Dr. Jones and prove that any well stocked expedition is a well armed one, opening fire on the raiders.  Yet, one of them proves bullet-proof, and he smashes through the guards.  Lois, displaying rather insane levels of courage, bare-handedly attacks the man she just saw shrug off rifle bullets, revealing him as Superman!  Unfortunately, it’s an amnesiac Man of Tomorrow who doesn’t recognize her, and the girl reporter finds herself taken prisoner.  The bandits use the confused champion, dressed up as a ghost, to scare away other visitors and take over the dig in order to loot it.

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Back in the states, a certain millionaire playboy hears about the mystery surrounding these events on the news and decides that Batman should investigate, which is a tad random.  O’Neil gives us a few touches of realism as Bruce complains about the heat and closes his eyes to prepare to enter the tomb without being blinded by the change in light.  Such little details are welcome. and add to the slightly higher tone of the tale

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As the Dark Knight springs into the supposedly haunted tomb, he surprises the Bedouin guards and acquits himself well until Superman suddenly appears.  The Masked Manhunter thinks his friend is playing a part, so he goes along with what he expects to be a staged fight, but only too late does he realize that the conflict is in deadly earnest.  The Man of Steel chokes his friend out, and the bandits take the Gotham Guardian prisoner!

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Meanwhile, we see Superman…or rather, SuperMEN, smashing into icy cliffs in the arctic.  What is this?!  It seems that the real Metropolis Marvel has been at this Fortress of Solitude working on his Superman robots, trying to get them functioning properly.  O’Neil hits his one of his favorite notes as we’re told that the trouble is too much pollution in the air, which is making the bots go haywire.  That bugged me a bit, because it felt a tad forced.  An increase in radiation affecting the machines would make a certain amount of sense, but this just seems a bit silly, an excuse for mentioning the author’s pet subject.  Nonetheless, the Kryptonian decides that he can’t trust his doppelgangers any longer, despite his best efforts, and he discovers that one of his robots is missing.  Heading back home, he hears about Lois’s disappearance and streaks off to the rescue.

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Arriving at the tomb, he confronts the bandits, who have enslaved their prisoners, forcing them to excavate the site.  Of course the sinister Superman is, in fact, the renegade robot.  Interestingly, when the real Man of Steel orders his artificial android back home, it refuses for an intriguing reason.  While its master has never treated it as anything but a machine, Brakh has treated it as a friend, and so it chooses to stand with him.  That’s…actually almost touching if you think about it.  Superman is entirely unmoved by this and doesn’t bother to ask if androids dream of electric sheep, just smashing the apparently sentient super-bot without a qualm!

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Batman gets in on the action, dropping the bandit, but the tomb is opened in the struggle, and a strange red light escapes from it, weakening the Metropolis Marvel.  Suddenly he is no match for the renegade robot, who lays a vicious beating on him in revenge for his mistreatment.  The Dark Knight tries to intercede, but the machine easily cleans his clock.  Just then, a glowing figure emerges from the darkness of the sepulcher in a nicely dramatic appearance.  It’s a mummy with a glowing red globe for a head, and it starts smashing everyone nearby.  This could look rather goofy, but I find it a surprisingly effective design.

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Taking a gamble, the Caped Crusader comes to his senses just in time to rescue Superman, tossing his cape over the creature’s glowing gourd.  His hunch was right, the creature’s head is some kind of device that gives off radiation similar to that of a red sun, weakening the Kryptonian.  When the antagonistic android tries to intercede, Batman gets some revenge, smashing the machine, and when the recovered mummy attacks again, Superman returns the favor, knocking the shinning sphere off of its shoulders with a boulder and then smashing what is revealed to be its robotic body.

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The exhausted champions theorize that the legendary King Malis was actually some type of advanced android created by an alien race and imprisoned on Earth centuries ago.  Sure.  That makes sense in a comic book-y kind of way.  The heroes suspect they’ll never learn the details of this weird case, but the Man of Steel notes that, whoever those beings were, “they had problems very like ours!”

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Ohh!  Batman with the bad-A one liner!  Nice!

That’s a droll ending to a fun adventure.  O’Neil gives us a solid romp here, full of dramatic peril and heroic efforts.  While Batman’s ignominious defeat by the Superman robot the first time is a bit disappointing, for the most part we see the wit and energy here that characterizes O’Neil’s better stories, as when Superman casually notes that he’d have to be foolish to make his own robots stronger than he is.  Strangely, despite the fact that O’Neil is doing such a bang-up job on the Batman books at this time, he doesn’t quite seem to capture the Dark Knight’s voice in this yarn.  Other than that, there are only two real flaws here, one being that the Masked Manhunter is captured, but not turned into the Maskless Manhunter, which makes no sense.  Why in the world wouldn’t the villains want to unmask Batman?  It’s a common trope, but not a good one.

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Perhaps more significantly, nobody at all seems even mildly concerned that this robot has suddenly developed sentience and free will, perhaps making it, in C.S. Lewis’s terminology, hnau.  Instead, his creator seems just mildly miffed that his walking toaster is talking back to him.  Frankenstein this ain’t, is what I’m saying, but as has often been the case with the stories we’ve encountered so far, this tale raises the specter of themes that it doesn’t have the interest to pursue, and that’s a shame.  Still, despite that oversight, O’Neil delivers a fun read here.  It might have benefited from being a two-parter and developing Malis and this strange alien race some more, but we’re left with the impression of depth.  Dillin’s art is really quite good throughout as well, and we’re not seeing some of that stiffness that often accompanies his JLA work.  There are several really nice sequences in this story.  I suppose I’ll give this adventure 3.5 Minutemen, as it is fun, but not quite living up to its potential.  On an unrelated note, it looks like the next issue features Aquaman.  Yay!

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The Head-Blow Headcount:

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We’ve got no additions to the Wall of Shame this month, but we’ve still collected quite a list of characters.  Who knows how many head-blows the future holds?


Final Thoughts:


Well, it took me a while, but I’ve gotten through another month in our journey!  Quite a month it was, featuring the return of legendary (and legendarily bad) Bat-villain, the Ten-Eyed Man…for some reason!  The ridiculousness of that story alone made this month of comics worth the read for me!  Still, there was a lot more here than just the Emperor of the Occulus.  We’ve also got Batgirl’s fashion adventures, an (almost) guest appearance by Spiro Agnew and Richard Nixon, and a cameo by Alfred Hitchcock.  You don’t see that every day in comics!

We encountered my least favorite JLA issue to date, thought it was certainly fascinating as a cultural artifact, providing a brief glimpse of the pop-culture production of the early 70s, as well as some biographical elements of a famed sci-fi writer.  Perhaps most notably, it pointed to Harlan Ellison’s involvement with comics in this era and the overlap and cross-pollination between mediums that is always the case.  The Flash continues to be a real, real drag, ironically enough, though the inclusion of an Elongated Man backup should help to lighten the blow.  O’Neil’s Superman, on the other hand, is staying surprisingly strong, delivering fun, even somewhat thoughtful, comics.  Now that he’s got full-length books to work with, it is paying off well.  It’s a shame that his Green Lantern/Green Arrow work can’t evince the same sense of adventure and wit.  I suppose he is trying too hard in that book.

On an even more exciting note, Jack Kirby’s Fourth World saga continues to develop, and with second issues, we’re starting to get into the meat of his stories.  Having read through his Fantastic Four run since the last time I read these books, I have a new perspective on how he is developing as an artist and storyteller, and it is fascinating to see.  Of course, it continues to be really interesting to see the context of his efforts in the Fourth World, and what is going on in the rest of the DCU really illustrates just how innovative and different his work was.  This month’s brief glimpse of cosmic, psychedelic elements in the Forever People is just a hint of such difference, but it is a telling one.

In terms of cultural significance, we saw a continued interest in the turmoil on campuses in both the Robin backup and our weird Supergirl tale this month, though it isn’t given as much focus as it has been.  Lois had another racially charged adventure this month, and despite its lack of success as a story, it points to the increasing social awareness in the DCU and, in particular, a focus on Native American issues.

Notably, we also saw the creation of a character by the ever unpredictable Bob Haney that really defied expectations for this era in the form of the feminine yet entirely independent and self-possessed Ruby Ryder.  Strangely, this was actually one of the elements of the month’s books that I found most interesting.  When even heroic women like Black Canary are still occasionally depicted as shrinking violets, it’s interesting to see Haney’s femme fatale hold her own in a man’s world, a businesswoman in an era when that type of thing was exceptionally rare.

Well, that will do it for the month of May, 1971!  I hope that y’all enjoyed the ride as much as I enjoyed the reads.  Stay safe out there in the real world!  For those of you in the paths of hurricanes, fires, floods, or earthquakes, I wish you all the best, and you’re in our prayers in the Grey household.  Remember folks, do what you can to help out, as there is a lot of need.  Until next time, keep the heroic ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: April 1971 (Part 5)

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Look!  Up in the sky!  It’s a bird!  It’s a plane!  No!  It’s….Into the Bronze Age!  And I’ve got quite a suite of stories for y’all today, mostly starring Superman!  We’ve got everything from emotional epics to spooky specters to menacing monsters, and with Jack Kirby thrown in to make it extra special!  The features below vary in quality, but they were all at least interesting reads, so see what awaits you as we travel further Into the Bronze Age!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #399
  • Adventure Comics #405
  • Aquaman #56 / (Sub-Mariner #72)
  • Detective Comics #410
  • The Flash #205 (Reprints, won’t be covered)
  • Mr Miracle #1
  • The Phantom Stranger #12
  • Superboy #173
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #109
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #137
  • Superman #236
  • Teen Titans #32

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #109


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“I’ll Never Fall in Love Again!”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Werner Roth
Inker: Vince Colletta
Cover Artist: Dick Giordano
Editor: E. Nelson Bridwell

“The Mask of Death!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

Look at this cover.  Dick Giordano gets to ply his pencil and does a fine job (especially on Supes’ stunned expression), though the whole is a bit on the boring side.  The real significance of the design, however, is how it just screams drama.  I was all set for a silly, soap opera-ish story, but what I found was surprising in quality and content.  It’s over the top at moments, but not nearly to the extent I expected.

The tale begins with Lois receiving a note at the Daily Planet that is straight out of The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.  It invites those with painful memories to come to the ‘Denison Clinic,’ where a ‘laser surgery’ will allow them to leave with “a trouble-free mind.”  Having someone cut into your brain with a laser?  What could go wrong!

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Now, I expected for Lois to uncritically to just go right on in and volunteer for this insane-sounding procedure, but Bates impressed me by having the girl reporter just go to investigate this place, hoping for a story.  Once there, the elderly Dr. Denison suddenly traps her inquisitive guest in a chair with a “magnetic force” (is Stan Lee writing this?), and begins to harangue her.

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ll109_05 - CopyApparently this woman was once a professor at Hudson University, where she became a mentor to Lana Lang.  Learning of her love for Superman and her heartbreak when the Man of Steel started chasing Lois, Denison decided that she must do something to protect her young protegee.

Interestingly, she herself has a similar story, as the man she loved became an actor and eventually married a starlet, a woman whom Denison has already “punished.”  Clearly, this lady’s got issues!

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She subjects Lois to a procedure that she claims will give her an “emotional lobotomy,” and destroy her capacity for love.  The girl reporter passes out, only to awaken to see Superman and the police have come to her rescue.  The cops were looking for Denison because she stole her equipment, which, incidentally, has been fitted with a self-destruct device to keep anyone from learning how to undo her handiwork.

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Roth does great work with Lois’s ‘hazy’ vision.

Lois is shaken to realize that she can feel nothing for the Man of Steel, even when he carries her home and is forced to perform some dazzling heroics by destroying rogue meteors (radioactive meteors, of course).  When he brings her back to her apartment, the nervous newshawk snaps, screaming at the Metropolis Marvel to get out and that she doesn’t want “a costumed freak” meddling in her life.  The Action Ace takes this with remarkable patience, leaving graciously and reasoning that she’s just still reeling from her close call.

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The next day, Lois researches Denison’s previous victim and discovers that the actress had been institutionalized!  At work, Clark keeps an eye on her and begins to notice that something is off with his lady love.  Meanwhile, Lana Lang has heard about what has happened and has gone to Dr. Denison in jail to plead with her to reverse her procedure, telling her former teacher that she has moved on.

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That night, Lois and Superman go out on the town, which is a little weird, really, especially when they go to a disco!  Yet, after a passionless kiss ends the night, the Man of Steel realizes decides to check up on the reporter, realizing something is still off.  He spies on her diary entry, which isn’t as creepy as it would normally be in this instance.  Lois confesses to her journal that she is just continuing to date Superman because she enjoys the attention, despite the fact that she feels nothing for him.  In a surprising moment, the Man of Tomorrow smashes the spire of a building in anger over this discovery, though he still has the good manners to fix it immediately afterwards.  It’s a believable moment of weakness, though it’s a pretty huge lapse, when you think about just how powerful he is.  That’s why Superman will later have nightmares about just such a lose of control.

Finally, Lana convinces Dr. Denison to tell them how to restore Lois, but it seems that this can only happen when Lois decides she wants to be able to love once more.  In the following days, Lois stays relentless, cold, and unfeeling, which honestly just might make her a better reporter.  Nonetheless, when she sees a child fall into the path of an oncoming car, she instinctively leaps to her rescue, and with a little unseen assist from Clark, she saves the girl.  The deed triggers, just for a moment, a flicker of emotion, and loveless lovely decides she wants to remember what it feels like to be human.

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Superman flies her out into the country where they meet a minstrel with a magical harp that supposedly can cure her.  Lois is skeptical but listens, and is eventually lulled to sleep.  After she drifts off, the minstrel is revealed to be Roland Kirk, the actor and former lover of the bitter Dr. Denison, who played a part to hypnotize Lois in the guise of a believable fiction.  It turns out that the original procedure was really a form of hypnosis itself, and the cure required a counter-spell of sorts strong enough to break the mental block.  When Lois awakens, she is back to normal, and the two sweethearts are reunited.  Lana, for her part, decides to seek her fortunes elsewhere, heading to a job in Europe.

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This was a curious and unusual little story.  The concept is over the top in standard comic fashion, yet, it works reasonably well.  The emotional core of this tale is surprisingly sincere and effective.  Essentially, what Dr. Denison takes from Lois is not love, per se, or at least, not specifically romantic love, or eros, but what we used to call ‘charity.’  What she robs her of is empathy and the capacity for selfless love that comes with it, the capacity that links us with God.  It is through the ability to love, not acquisitively, but selflessly, ‘charitably,’ that we access the best of human life, the joy that echoes of heaven, and the coldness and emptiness of life without the ability to experience that emotion is really quite a chilling prospect.

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Bates doesn’t realize the full potential of his setup, but neither does he do too bad of a job.  He clearly does understand the significance of charity, and it is to his credit that he doesn’t just limit Lois’s loss to romantic love.  Dr. Denison’s bitter reasoning for targeting Lois is believable (in comic terms), and Lois’s moment of revelation is fairly striking.  Throughout, Werner Roth continues to turn out beautiful art, and his wonderfully detailed faces help to deliver the emotional impact of the story.  Throughout the comic, what could be silly and simplistic is actually treated with some level of thoughtfulness.  The last scene with the random minstrel set up is a bit odd, but I suppose that, in the DC Universe, a dude with a magic instrument is really one of the more believable possibilities for such a situation, especially if you travel in the same kinds of crazy circles as Lois Lane.  So, all told, I think I’ll surprise myself by giving this odd little emotional drama 4 Minutemen.

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“The Mask of Death”


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We continue the ongoing adventures of Rose and Thorn in this backup feature, and today’s adventure is certainly different!  Instead of cops and robbers, this issue plays ghouls and ghosts!  It begins in the normal way, with our favorite vicious vixen trashing some 100 goons.  She jumps a truckfull of hijackers and tears through them, crashing the vehicle.  Once more, Danny Stone is left to pick up the pieces, but this time we are joining the Nymph of Night at the end of her sojourn.

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When she returns to her home base, she discovers a weeping specter in a mask in the secret hallway!  What vision is this?  The figure transforms into a beautiful young woman who says she is the ghost of Selena Mason, an aspiring actress from years ago, and she proceeds to tell her story.

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In some senses, it’s a familiar tale.  A beautiful young woman who would be a star falls in with a controlling man that helps her career, at a cost.  In this case, the controlling fellow is not a director or the like, but a costumer, which is odd.  In fact, he owns the very costume shop that lies adjacent to Rose’s home, forming her base.  Still, he’s every inch the sleeze, and Selena sees him consorting with gangsters, using the Thorn’s secret passage to smuggle them in and out of his shop.

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The tailor, Albert Talbot, thinks he possesses Selena, and when the young starlet falls in love with her co-star, the maddened man throws acid in her face in a classic ‘if I can’t have you, no one will’ move.  It’s a brutal act, and the acid-splashed actress grabs a mask to cover her marred visage, running into the secret passage, where she died from her wounds.  Dark!  The ghost begs the Vixen of Vengeance to live up to her sobriquet so that her restless spirit can find peace, but before the Baleful Beauty can respond, she realizes that the sun is coming up, so she rushes to turn back into Rose and falls asleep.

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This is an interesting change of pace.  There’s no reason why pretty much any character in the DCU couldn’t encounter the supernatural, as ghosts and ghoulies are pretty well established as part of this setting, but it does rather come out of nowhere here.  It is neat to see an explanation for the super convenient abandoned costume shop and secret passage, though.  The spirit’s story is suitably tragic, and it is certainly something that is right up Thorn’s alley, a woman wronged.  Once again, Kanigher manages to split his story effectively, delivering enough to intrigue and entertain, but not so much that it really hurts for space.  I think, in many ways, the compressed backups in Lois Lane are pulling out some of his better work.  On the whole, it’s a good read, so I’ll give it 3.5 Minutemen.  I’m curious to see where it will go next issue.

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P.S.: The letter column for this issue, dealing with the surprising (and surprisingly touching) issue #106, is really noteworthy.  It’s full of praise for that story, including several letters from readers who are themselves part of a minority.  There’s one particularly arresting letter from a 15 year old black boy.  What must it have been like to be a minority comic reader in this era and suddenly see a story filled with black faces and focused on the subject of race amidst a medium that was almost 100% white?  This is pretty cool, and though stories focusing on race seem to be popping out of the woodwork in 1971 (Captain America and the Falcon shared a story arc focused on the theme the same year), the issue is still a special one.  The editor also helpfully informed us that the comic in question was inspired by the movie, Black Like Me, which sounds like a pretty powerful look at race relations in the Civil Rights era South.

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Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #137


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“The Four-Armed Terror!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta

For our second comic of the day, we’ve got more Jack Kirby goodness!  We return to Jimmy Olsen’s antics, and the King continues to deliver on the imaginative and wildly creative work he’s been doing on this book.  In fact, it seems that, with much of his setup work done over the last few issues, there is more time for him to play with what he’s created, and pretty much every facet of the strange Wild Area gets a check-in with this tale.  We begin by discovering what was in the enigmatic egg in the previous issue.  It’s a nicely hideous monster that looks a bit like Etrigan the Demon’s uglier cousin.  Etrigan is still a year away from his debut, but I have to imagine that Kirby liked this design, the yellow skin and the red eyes, and decided to do more with it.  Either way, this strange four-armed creature smashes through the forest of the Wild Area, driven by a mysterious hunger.

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It’s headlong hurry brings it into contact with the remnants of the Outsiders biker gang, who futilely try to fight it.  The monster shrugs off their weapons and wrecks their bikes.  Meanwhile, back in the Mountain of Judgement Jimmy Olsen is seated behind the controls of one of the most Kirby of Kirbytech devices I’ve ever seen.  It turns out to be a fancy instrument that converts “radio-signals from the stars and convert[s] them into mental musical images.”

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It’s the kind of far-out concept that can almost be grasped but stretches the imagination in the attempt, which is pretty cool.  This is an invention of the ‘Hairies,’ who are gathered with the Newsboy Legion for a performance.  The scene is only marred by Flippa-Dippa’s existence and incessant narcissism: “It’s like a movie musical-and everybody’s in it!  Includin’ me, Flippa-Dippa!”  Urg…it’s bad enough to shoe-horn yourself into every conversation, but it’s even worse when you do so in third person!

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What in the world is wrong with Superman’s hand?!

What follows, sadly, is not Flippa-Dippa’s grisly demise, but another beautiful set of Kirby-collages.  I’ve had very mixed feelings about this device in the past, but I have to say, I think it works very well in this instance, successfully capturing something abstract and unimaginable, and in this instance, because the images are not supposed to be phsyically real, the contrast between the character art and background isn’t problematic.  It’s a psychedelic scene, and another example of Kirby’s continued innovation.

 

Anyway, the sonic sojourn is interrupted by a sudden jarring tremor, and the crew learn that the base is under attack from an unknown source!  Superman rushes off to investigate, but he orders the Legion to stay behind, which they don’t take too well.  There’s a fun full-page scene where the Newsboys elect Jimmy their leader and decide to follow the Man of Steel in the hopes of adventure and a good story.  It’s just their heads gathered together in a huddle, and it’s a fun image, full of personality.  Meanwhile, our four-armed friend from the beginning is tearing his way through the earth in search of sustenance.  We discover that he’s after nuclear energy, which he seeks in the main power plant of the Wild Area.  Kirby’s narration is actually rather evocative and helps to crank up the tension.  I would say his writing is getting better, but I seem to recall some rough patches in the future.  We’ll see, I suppose.

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His efforts release a wave of atomic energy that rocks the entire wild world, wrecking the Habitat from a few issues back.  In a curious little touch, Kirby gives us a glimpse of the brutish Yango, one of the bikers, who surprisingly steps up selflessly during the crisis and directs the evacuation.  I wonder if we’ll see him again at some point in time and if we’re supposed to take his change of heart as inspired by our heroes.

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Either way, we quickly move back to Superman as the kids try to follow him in the Whiz Wagon, but the Action Ace has raced the Flash, and the Legion just can’t keep up with him!  The Metropolis Marvel finds the wreckage marking the monster’s passage, and soon confronts the creature.   Yet, even the Man of Tomorrow finds himself challenged by his atomic antagonist’s nuclear strength!  Superman takes a beating, though he manages to throw the beast off of him in time for the Legion to arrive.  Their efforts prove useless, despite a weapon the Hairies gave Jimmy, and the four-armed fiend uses his newly absorbed energy to trap the team in a cocoon of strange energy.

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The immediate threat dealt with, he continues to make his way towards the central atomic pile, while sinister eyes look on.  The guardians of the Evil Factory, Mokkari and Simyan who have unleashed this mutant D.N.Alien on our heroes admire their handiwork.  Their plan is for the monster to destroy the reactor, causing a nuclear explosion that will destroy everything in the area.  The last image of the book is of our two Apokaliptian antagonists looking on as a horde of other monstrous minions hatch from their eggs!

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jimmyolsen137-28Interestingly, we get a map of the whole place, and it doesn’t quite make sense.  We see the layout of everything, but we learn that the Project, Zoomway, Wild Area and the rest are all in a massive cavern under Metropolis…which doesn’t work at all with the first issue where the Legion traveled a long way overland to reach the place.  Kirby was constantly changing things as new ideas struck him, and this certainly seems like an example of that tendency.

This was certainly a fun issue, and the bizarre, imaginative musical journey at its start was a notable feature.  I admire Kirby’s attempt to give the adventure story more purpose than just fighting.  He’s bringing the same sense of exploration, of wide-eyed wonder at what might be, to this book that he brought to the classic Fantastic Four.  That’s important.  Such efforts are not to be discounted because adventure is about more than just punching bad guys; it’s about meeting marvels and seeing things you’ve never seen before.  There is value in wonder for wonder’s sake.  I think that’s something that Kirby understood. 

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That’s a heck of a cliffhanger…

The central conflict of the tale, the monster’s rampage, is suitably gripping, and the stakes are plenty high as an atomic explosion would destroy, not just the Wild Area, but Metropolis as well!  There are also some (perhaps unintentional) interesting thematic elements in the concept of a man-made monster powered by atomic energy threatening to destroy humanity.  There’s some good irony inherent in that setup.  In general, other than Flippa-Dippa’s grating presence, this is a great comic.  Of course Kirby’s art is great, and that three-page musical journey is particularly cool.  It’s a fun read, and the feature creature posses a believable threat to Superman.  That being said, the Man of Steel’s presence in the book really leaves the Legion starved for space.  It’s a shame that the King wasn’t allowed to tell the story he really wanted with them, but he certainly made the best of it!  I’ll give this inventive comic 4.5 Minutemen.

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And with that dramatic conclusion, I also end this post.  It’s really astonishing how much variety DC had back then, with earth-shattering, otherworldly plots in one book and emotion-driven drama (of a sort) in another.  It’s a testament to the versatility of the medium that such disparate stories can be told i it.  Well, I’m racing to get actual work done this summer, but I’m still trying to carve time out for this feature.  Even if it takes me a little while, I hope you will all join me again for another step in our journey into The Bronze Age!  Until then, keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: February 1971 (Part 5)

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Hello Internet travelers!  It’s been radio silence here on the Greylands for the last week.  Lady Grey and I traveled to Iceland over spring break, and we were busy taking the advice of Granger from Fahrenheit 451, who said “Stuff your eyes with wonder […] live as if you’d drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It’s more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories.”  We spent some time out there in this gloriously beautiful world, reveling in the unsurpassed glory of creation, and we had a great time.

We visited waterfalls, hiked on glaciers, and even snorkeled in a glacial river between two tectonic plates (and that was intense, let me tell you!).  It was a really wonderful and necessary break, and sadly now we have to come back to the real world with all of its endless problems.  At least there are bright and hopeful comics to keep us company!  Today, I’ve got a pair of titles and a trio of stories.  I hope y’all enjoy my commentary as we travel farther Into the Bronze Age!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #397
  • Adventure Comics #402
  • Aquaman #55
  • Batman #229
  • Detective Comics #408
  • The Flash #203
  • Justice League of America #87 (AND Avengers #85-6)
  • The Phantom Stranger #11
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #108
  • Superman #234
  • Teen Titans #31
  • World’s Finest #200

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Phantom Stranger #11


Phantom_Stranger_Vol_2_11“Walk Not in the Desert’s Sun…”
Writer: Gerry Conway
Penciler: Jim Aparo
Inker: Jim Aparo
Letterer: Jim Aparo

Underneath this suitably creepy cover, we’ve got about two-thirds of a really awesome comic that takes a hard left turn right at the climax.  The resultant story is a bit odd, but it still ends up being an interesting read with surprisingly sophisticated handling of some rather unexpected themes.  Gerry Conway makes his return to scripting DC books, and he is already displaying impressive maturity and skill.  The growing seriousness of the Bronze Age is definitely on display in this issue as well.

It begins with the Phantom Stranger narrating a string of strange phenomena in the night sky over the western hemisphere, as people all over the world look up and see a sinister triangular shape of purple hanging framed against the stars.  Three nights later, the police in New York try to talk a desperate woman down from the Brooklyn Bridge.  She has just killed a man, and she screams that she will be her own master from now on.  As she rants, she slips off over the side and plunges into the fog, only to vanish before hitting the water.  Aparo gives us a wonderfully atmospheric two-page spread of the incident that adds to the mystery.  The police are baffled, and the sudden appearance and cryptic warning by the Phantom Stranger doesn’t do much to comfort them.

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Meanwhile, apparently the Weathermen have taken their bat-guano insanity inter-planetary, as a pair of dropouts have somehow managed to hijack an Apollo spacecraft and are planning to crash it into Washington D.C. in protest of the space program’s ‘waste’ of resources.  Really?  That’s what you’ve got a problem with?  Not the war in Vietnam, the race problems, or police brutality?  I’m glad you boys have your priorities right.  Despite the pleas of mission control, it seems like this inexplicably capable pair of nutjobs is going to make good on their threats, but the capsule suddenly goes off course and splashes harmlessly into the Atlantic, empty!

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the phantom stranger (1969) 11 - 05The Stranger has noticed all of these events, and after spotting a story about a glowing pyramid suddenly showing up in the Sudan, he decides to investigate.  How does he get there?  Why, by flying commercial, just like everyone else.  It’s a weird sight to see the Stranger just walking through the airport.  Does he even have a passport?  Or money?  Either way, on the flight, he meets a young woman named Lynn Berg (Lindbergh reference?) who wants to talk to him because she gets nervous on flights.  The Stranger’s slightly odd response is perfect, as he says “Feel free to speak.”  Not the most warm and welcoming, is the Phantom Stranger.

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You have to wonder if he uses his powers to skip the lines…

They arrive in Israel, and in a move that really surprised me, Lynn begins to talk about the current troubles in the Middle East, philosophizing about the conflict and war in general, wondering if there can ever be a right or wrong in such conflicts.  Just as the Stranger begins to share his own critique of warfare, Lynn’s brother arrives to pick her up, only to run right into a terrorist attack.  The Stranger foresees it moments before it occurs but too late to prevent it.  A pair of (presumably) Palestinians throw grenades, which kill Lynn’s brother, shouting “for my dead father!”

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In response, the young woman, consumed by grief and rage, chases after the pair, attacking them, wrestling a knife away from one of them and actually killing him with it!  The Stranger sort of ineffectually calls after her and watches helplessly (which doesn’t really make a ton of sense), as the dead terrorist drops the grenade he’d been holding, causing an explosion and apparently vaporizing Lynn.  This is an incredibly effective scene.  Just as the traveling companions are talking about war and the cycle of vengeance, that very cycle plays out before our eyes.  In revenge for some unknown act that cost them their father, two men kill an innocent.  In response, the dead man’s sister is herself blinded by vengeance and kills one of them, dooming all three.  It’s a powerful and surprisingly subtle demonstration of the endless nature of revenge.  The effect is rather arresting.

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But, this is a comic, and we’ve got other, stranger fish to fry, so the scene shifts to that mysterious glowing pyramid our enigmatic hero read about.  Inside, a masked figure in Egyptian regalia holds forth to a gathered crowd, explaining his evil plan, and evil it is.  In attendance are all of those people warped by hatred and selfishness who were snatched away from their deaths, including the girl from the bridge and the two pseudo-astronauts.  Evil-tut explains that he is the ‘Messiah of Evil,’ and has drawn all of them together in order to build ‘an army of evil’!  Strangely, Lynn Berg is in a cell there as well, drawn thither because her heart was filled with hate at the moment of her death.  Suddenly, the Stranger is there in her prison, and he comforts the girl.

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Just then, guards burst in, and when the Spectral Sleuth tries to fight them, he encounters a powerful force-field.  What’s more, they knock him out with just a touch, which also seems odd.  The Stranger is brought before the fiendish pharaoh, who reveals himself to be…Tannarak!  That’s right, the promising villain from the last  issue returns, and in grand fashion!  Apparently, at the moment of his death beneath the falling statue, he was snatched away by powerful beings who called themselves the ‘Gods of Hate,’ who chose him as their champion, as the Messiah of Evil and charged him to build an army of the like-minded with which to seize power.

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The Stranger shouts that such an agenda would “upset the very balance of the universe” and invokes the concepts of chaos and order, declaring “this must not be!”  He strikes down the guards, somehow now able to do so, despite the fact that a few pages before he couldn’t’ even touch them, and then charges Tannarak.  Yet, the sorcerer is not to be taken so easily, and he zaps the hero with a beam that turns his own hate and anger against him.  The mysterious one realizes that his rage is self-defeating, so he calms his mind and strikes out, not in anger and not for revenge, but for justice, and delivers a great blow.

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Yet, he and Lynn are still badly outnumbered, so they flee, and here is where things get weird.  Well…weirder, in context.  They race into a chamber filled with advanced machines, alien machines!  They trigger a defense mechanism and are bombarded by terrible rays, but each selflessly tries to shield the other.

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The apparently mechanical sentries of the machines note that they had thought Earth the perfect place to build an empire of evil, as they had found the planet’s inhabitants purely selfish beings, but this act of sacrifice makes them reconsider.  They decide that they must seek what they want elsewhere and decide to destroy their base, the pyramid, because their mission is a failure.  When the rays shut off, the Stranger and the girl flee, leaving Tannarak and his minions to face a cataclysmic explosion!  In a really surprisingly grim touch, Lynn is driven mad by the experience.  As the Stranger says, her “mind has escaped whither they cannot follow.”

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Wow.  Okay.  Where to even begin with a story like this?  It has some really fantastic elements, and the scene with the terrorist attack is unquestionably quite strong and touching.  There’s probably no clearer symbol of the endless cycle of vengeance in the modern imagination than the conflicts in the Holy Land, and that scene was handled with surprising maturity and subtlety.  I love seeing Tannarak return as well.  I think he’s got a ton of potential, and his being chosen as a champion of evil makes perfect sense.  After all, he was a completely selfish being, putting his own continued existence above every other concern, and what is evil but the ascension of selfishness, the triumph of will?  At the same time, that’s why the trappings of his ‘army of evil’ were slightly disappointing to me, as I’d have liked to see just a slightly more sophisticated treatment of their morality.  Evil very rarely owns the fact that it is evil; instead, it is much more common for that type of utter selfishness to hold itself up as the greatest good, as it so often does in our own society.

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Of course, then there’s the alien element which just comes out of left field.  Why not just have Tannarak’s backers be mysterious and sinister beings?  Making them some kind of aliens just doesn’t fit with the rest of the story, and it certainly doesn’t fit with the Egyptian motif without some type of explanation.  Tannarak was raised in Egypt, so we could have just hand-waved the pharaoh act if left to his own devices.  Add to this the different moments that just don’t quite make sense, like the invulnerable guards suddenly becoming conveniently vulnerable and the Stranger’s unexplained commercial flight, and you’ve got a very uneven story.  All of those rough edges could have been smoothed over with a bit of thought (perhaps the Stranger took a dive in the first fight, and perhaps he was on the flight to keep an eye on Lynn), but we don’t get any such attention in the comic.  In the end, it’s a story with a ton of potential, but the final result is just a bit too clumsy.  I’ll give it 3.5 Minutemen on the strength of its treatment of its themes, but it loses plenty because of its oddities.

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Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #108


Superman's_Girlfriend,_Lois_Lane_Vol_1_108“The Spectre Suitor”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Werner Roth
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: E. Nelson Bridwell

“Mourn for the Thorn!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito
Editor: E. Nelson Bridwell

We’ve got a super gimmicky cover, once again focused on a troubled wedding for the Man of Steel and the glamorous girl reporter, which seems something of a tradition for this book.  While the story inside isn’t quite as gimmicky as its wrapping, it is more than a little weird.

lois_lane_108_03The strange tale opens at the home of Sir Noel Tate, a wealthy man who Lois is interviewing.  However, when we join them, they have put the question and answer session on hold in order to investigate sounds coming from the old fellow’s souvenir room.  They interrupt a trio of thieves in the process of robbing the join who knock Tate out and begin to threaten Lois.  The plucky girl reporter holds her own for a while, but just as one of the thieves is about to skewer her, mysterious things start to go wrong for him and his confederates.  They’re attacked by an unseen assailant and driven away.  When Tate comes to, he tells Lois that she’s in danger…from a ghost relative of his!  Interestingly, Lois scoffs at the idea of ghosts, as if that’s even slightly less believable than half of the ridiculous stuff she encounters on a daily basis.

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Back at the Daily Planet, Sir Noel’s efforts to warn the journalist are intercepted by an invisible presence.  It apparently possesses Jimmy to lure Lois out of her office, then poses as her on the phone to Tate.  Next, for some reason, it draws Lois into the slums of the city, where she observes an interesting scene.  A desperate young man holds a slum-lord at gunpoint, and despite the fat-cat’s pleas for mercy, the gunman insists that he’s preyed on his tenants too long and too viciously to be spared.  It’s a scene somewhat reminiscent of the infamous Green Lantern/Green Arrow #76.

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What makes this moment fascinating is the social commentary present in it.  There’s nothing really sympathetic about the slum-lord, despite the fact that he’s got the law on his side in this encounter, and it is implied that men like him are the reason for the deplorable conditions in the slums.  Before the would-be murderer can finish his grim deed, his landlord has a heart attack and dies, courtesy of the mysterious ghostly suitor, who is himself moved by the plight of this area.  Cryptically, he mentions how it reminds him of London’s East End from 83 years ago.

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Meanwhile, Superman arrives for a romantic dinner with Lois, and we get one of the strangest scenes in the book.  After the couple shares a kiss, the ghostly stalker realizes that he’s got some pretty powerful competition.  So, he uses the power of plot to conjure a vision of Kal-El’s mother, Lara, in Lois’s eyes.  The vision is super vague, but it’s presents the Kryptonian woman in horror at the approach of something, and this creeps the Man of Steel out.  When Lois starts laughing uncontrollably, he freaks out and almost hits her!  Horrified at his reaction, Superman flies away in disgust.  The whole scene is just odd.  It doesn’t really make sense, at least in part because the ghost’s powers are so vaguely defined that we’re not sure what is his doing and what is reaction (or overreaction).  The end result is just rather disjointed and seems like a clumsy excuse to get the Metropolis Marvel out of the picture.

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That night, Lois has a nightmare about her wedding with Superman being interrupted by her spectral suitor, only to awake and find a letter from his ghostly hand that declares he’s going to bring her to his spirit world soon.  Despite her best efforts, the ghost prevents the desperate reporter from revealing her plight by stealing her voice and freezing her hands, and the next night, he summons her to Sir Noel’s estate, where she steals the knight’s nefarious ancestor’s dirk.  A frightened Tate calls Clark Kent in search of Superman, but before the hero can arrive, Lois is transported back through time to London’s East End in the 19th Century, through the ill-defined power of the ghost and his dagger.

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She arrives and is confronted by a mysterious figure emerging from the mist, but just as he’s about to stab her, he declares that she’s “not like the others.”  Lois realizes that her spectral suitor is none other than the ghost of Jack the Ripper!  Just then, Superman arrives, having scoured time to find her (and I like the detail that he didn’t know exactly when to look), and takes her home, where Sir Noel fills in the blanks.  Apparently, his ancestor was driven mad by the deplorable conditions of London and set out to punish the women who represented those conditions, the prostitutes who walked the streets, which seems pretty monstrously unfair.  The ghost sent Lois back so that his living self could kill her, but the Ripper realized that she was an innocent and couldn’t bring himself to do it.  Confused yet?  Fortunately, the dirk was destroyed when Lois was sent back in time, so the spirit is now banished for good.

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This is just a weird, wandering tale.  It has some effectively creepy elements, and there is some definite menace as poor Lois is hounded by her invisible, unstoppable stalker.  The fact that a story featuring Superman manages to conjure up that sense of helplessness is actually fairly impressive, but the plot is just too random and too rushed to be entirely effective.  Even Werner Roth’s usually beautiful art isn’t quite up to the standards we’ve gotten used to in the last few issues.  There are several spots where his figures seem awkward and stiff, especially his Superman.  I’ll give this one 2.5 Minutemen.  It isn’t bad per se, just a little off.

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“Mourn for the Thorn”


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Unfortunately, this issue’s Rose and Thorn backup isn’t much better.  The usually impressive series suffers from some really goofy elements and an altogether rushed plot in this outing.  It begins, strangely enough, with the strip’s protagonist dead!  Lois and Superman look on as the valiant Thorn lies dead in her golden coffin, apparently finally having fallen prey to the 100.  We then get a flashback that tells us how the Nymph of Night met her fate.  She cornered #24 on her hit parade and took him out in an alley, only to…die…somehow…because of car exhaust?  It’s an exceedingly silly scene.

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Thorn is standing in an alley when the killer’s partner backs his car towards her.  Does he run her down?  Pin her against the wall?  No, don’t be silly.  He stops next to her and poisons her with carbon monoxide.  Now, I know that emissions standards were worse in the 70s, but I’m still thinking that simply running your car in an alley didn’t create the equivalent or mustard gas or anything.  It’s such a ludicrously impractical way to kill someone and so unnecessarily complicated that it takes you right out of the tale.

After the Thorn is killed, the 100 apparently take her body back to their funeral parlor front, not bothering with the authorities or anything, and nobody notices that there’s a murdered woman just sitting in the front window.  Later, a woman with the “Friends of the Friendless” comes to claim the body.  She’s a member of the 100 who is playing a part, despite the fact that the funeral parlor’s owner is their leader, which doesn’t make much sense.  The whole sequence feels unnecessary, as the killers could have just taken her body and done whatever they wanted with it, skipping this whole dog and pony show.

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The criminals bring the boxed Baleful Beauty to a sinister looking old house called ‘The Mansion of Mourning,’ which is an admittedly cool name.  It’s a front for the 100 as well, providing a hideout for their wanted members.  As they prepare to plant the Thorn in a grave, her perfidious pallbearers drop the casket, and rain splashes on her face.  Suddenly, the Vixen of Vengeance revives!  She rises from the grave in a pretty fantastic panel that, if the story had more space, would have made a great splash page.  Apparently, the vigilante took some medicine to fake her death when she realized she was trapped, and she claims she always wears nose filters which prevented her from asphyxiating.  Ooookay.

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Well, the Thorn makes swift work of the gathered hoods in a nice full-page action sequence and then drops another set of numbers on her newest catch.  Returning home, she awakens as Rose, who finds herself weeping at the news of the vigilante’s death, despite the fact that she doesn’t know her.

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This story has some great elements.  In fact, the big reveal of the Thorn’s return from the grave and the last moment with Rose’s unexplained connection to her alter ego are both quite good.  Yet, the story overall is a bit on the weak side.  It’s clear that Kanigher is really struggling with his page count in this one.  While he’s done a great job at creating condensed, simplified plots that worked remarkably well in only 8 pages, this issue’s effort is just too convoluted.  The silly method of the heroine’s “death” combined with the unnecessary complications involving her burial and the funeral parlor break too much with verisimilitude without explanation or excuse and they take away from an interesting story idea.  The resulting yarn is worth only a substandard 2 Minutemen.

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I hope you enjoyed my coverage of these two comics.  We’re almost done with February, just three more comics to go!  In the next post, we’ll see what Denny O’Neil’s got in store for his Superman revamp, which I’m excited about.  I hope you’ll join me again soon for my coverage of that and more!  Until then, keep the heroic spirit alive!

Into the Bronze Age: January 1971 (Part 3)

DC-Style-Guide-2.jpg
Hello my dear readers, and welcome to my penultimate post about January 1971!  Today, we’ve got my first coverage of a Superboy issue, as well as some Superman’s Girlfriend, so we’ve got tons of super-action.  We’ve also got G.I. Combat, for a more serious story, and the trio are a good set of books.  Please join me as I work my way through them.

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #396
  • Adventure Comics #401
  • Batman #228 (reprints, won’t be covered)
  • Brave and Bold #93
  • Detective Comics #407
  • G.I. Combat #145
  • Superboy #171
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #107
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #135
  • Superman #232 (reprints, won’t be covered)
  • Superman #233

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


G.I. Combat #145


gi_combat_145“Sand, Sun and Death”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Russ Heath
Inker: Russ Heath
Editor: Joe Kubert

“A Hatful of War”
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: Mort Drucker
Inker: Mort Drucker
Editor: Whitney Ellsworth

“The Iron Punch”
Writer: Ed Herron
Penciler: Arthur F. Peddy
Inker: Arthur F. Peddy

gicombat145-03“Hot Corner”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Joe Kubert
Inker: Joe Kubert

“Mile Long Step”
Writer: John Reed
Penciler: Jerry Grandenetti
Inker: Jerry Grandenetti

“Glory Drive”
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: Joe Kubert
Inker: Joe Kubert

“Missing: 320 Men”
Writer: Sam Glanzman
Penciler: Sam Glanzman
Inker: Sam Glanzman

The Haunted Tank crew rides again, and it seems we’re back in North Africa.  Once more, the ghostly guardian of the tank is singularly unhelpful, appearing in precisely one panel.  I’m beginning to grow frustrated with this book, despite the fact that most of its stories are fairly entertaining.  As I’ve said before, it just feels like a waste of a great concept when the ghost has no impact on the plot.

In this particular comic, J.E.B. tells Jeb that “there is more than one ghost in this battlefield,” which proves as pointlessly prophetic as usual.  Just as the tank commander begins to ask for something actually useful, the desert sands around them begin to erupt with tank fire, and the Stuart finds itself in the crosshairs of not one, not two, not three, but FIVE panthers!  It’s a wonderfully dynamic double-page spread, but it also seems ridiculously improbable that a light tank could last for five seconds in such a situation, much less actually get away.  The crew conducts a running fight as they flee, but eventually run out of ammo and escape into a dust storm.

The German commander pursues but loses them in the swirling sand.  Once the dust settles, the Tank is confronted with a strange sight, a battle damaged but intact B-25, just sitting in the middle of the desert.  Out of ammo and low on fuel and, more than anything else, just plain curious, the crew investigates.  They find the bomber’s co-pilot and gunners all dead, but the pilot is missing.  Suddenly, that very pilot appears, looking quite the worse for wear.  He holds them at gunpoint, and it quickly becomes apparent that he’s been driven mad by his experiences.

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The pilot, a lieutenant, was on a bombing mission with his crew, their very first combat mission, and they ran into an absolute forest of flak and fighter power.  Everyone onboard was killed but the pilot, and he turned back, limping the plane down into the desert.  He can’t face the reality that all of his men are dead.  Just then, the German armor shows up, and the Lieutenant agrees to help the tank crew hold them off, swearing he won’t fail his men a second time.  Arch, Slim, and Rick man the turret positions on the bomber, and Jeb himself, with the Lieutenants help, cooks up a surprise for the tanks.

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Now, here we get to an even more ridiculous moment, as the crew manages to take out two German tanks…with machine guns!  A B-25 is armed with a mixture of .30 and .50 caliber machine guns which MIGHT be able to mess up a lightly armored vehicle but would be about as useful against an actual battle tank as a spitball.  What’s more, the German armor apparently has a hard time hitting the gigantic, stationary plane.  It’s a cool scene, but it makes no sense!

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Well, improbable firepower aside, Jeb and the pilot sneak behind the tanks and hit them with Molotov cocktails, which is actually much more believable, especially because the loony Lieutenant gets gunned down while doing so.  The battle won, the pilot asks to be put back in the cockpit, and he passes away, determined to see his crew back home at last.

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This is an okay story, so far as it goes, though it’s got several really unbelievable bits, and I’m not even talking about the Confederate ghost!  It’s one thing to show your light tank, crewed by a heroic quartet and guided by a ghostly guardian, able to take out heavier opponents.  That is, technically speaking, possible, though it is wildly unlikely.  If you hit it just right, it’s within the realm of possibility that a Stuart’s main gun could knock out even a tiger tank if the stars were aligned properly.  On the other hand, a machine gun isn’t going to do more than scratch the paint of a medium or heavy tank.  At most, you might get lucky and put some rounds through the view ports. This kind of thing bothers me, especially in a setting like this that aims, to a certain degree, at verisimilitude.

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The pilot’s pitiful break from reality caused by his horrific first mission and the deaths of his crew is moderately affecting, and his delusional death manages to strike that melancholy note that so many of these stories strive for.  It’s also interesting that his decision to turn back is treated with sympathy and made justifiable in context.  That said, I don’t think he gets quite enough space to be entirely effective.  Of course, Russ Heath’s art is as beautiful and striking as usual.  He’s really a fantastic fit for this book.  In the end, this story is just so-so.  I’ll give it 3 Minutemen.

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Superboy #171


superboy_vol_1_171“Dark Strangler of the Seas!”
Writer: Frank Robbins
Penciler: Bob Brown
Inker: Murphy Anderson

This was a surprisingly enjoyable issue.  I had braced for some hokey silliness, though I had some hope because AquaBOY had a cameo, which seemed like fun.  I was surprised to find this comic very much a fitting offering for 1971.  Teaming Superboy and Aquaboy is a great idea, and I’m rather surprised that it took this long for DC to come up with it.  After all, what other DC hero could easily have been active at the same time as Superboy?  Batman was out traveling the world and getting his education, and everyone else was still living their regular lives for the most part.  Aquaman, however, was wandering the seas as a young man, and he could definitely have shared some adventures with the Boy of Steel.

The plot of this yarn centers around something that surprised me, namely, oceanic oil spills.  I didn’t expect to see this issue getting attention way back in 1971.  I thought that the focus on oil pollution was a bit more recent, centering around some of the big spills of the 80s and 90s.  Looking at a list of oil spills, though, I see that there were a few major ones around this time, so the issue would definitely have been in the zeitgeist.  The story itself begins in striking fashion, with a pair of fishermen struggling to pull in a strange catch, and when Superboy happens by and gives them a hand, a dark, humanoid shape is pulled up out of the surf.

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The Boy of Steel realizes that this is a human being covered in crude oil, and he rushes him to an industrial detergent factory, where, with the help of the workmen, he manages to clean the oil off and reveal…Aquaboy!  Holding his head above the tank to prevent the strange youth from drowning, Superboy unwittingly nearly dooms the young Marine Marvel.  In desperation, the Prince of the Sea slips out of his hands and catches his ‘breath’ underwater, taking the opportunity to explain to his super-powered savior what happened.

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In a surprisingly touching scene, Aquaboy relates how he encountered a dolphin covered in oil and drowning because of it.  Despite his best efforts to clean the oil off, the creature died before his eyes, and the Marine Monarch set out to seek revenge for the needless death.  He found an oil tanker, leaking a constant stream of crude, and they ignored his orders to heave-to.  Not to be deterred, he launched a one-man boarding action and started cracking heads, but he sliped in some oil and….oh no!  That’s right, it’s Head-Blow Headcount time, as he took a belaying pin to the back of the head and got knocked out.  The crew threw him overboard and then attempted to drown him in oil.  Fortunately, his finny friends towed him to shore, hoping humans could help their prince.

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superboy-171-0011Superboy is aghast at this callous disregard for life, and he agrees to help the young Sea Sleuth seek justice.  They fly to the offices of the tanker’s owners, Trans-East Oil Company, and they let them know that they’d better fix their fleet of tankers or face the consequences.  In a further sign of the shift in values going on in comics and in the culture, the company’s owners are classic industrialist villains, much more concerned with their bottom lines than any cost to the environment.  Shades of Captain Planet!

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Not to be denied, the youthful heroes decide to take matters into their own hands.  Aquaboy begins locating leaking tankers, and Superboy begins rounding them up, taking them to the middle of the desert, dumping out their oily cargo, and then dropping them into dry-dock to be fixed at their owner’s expense.  It’s a rather delightfully chaotic scheme, ignoring laws in pursuit of what is right.

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Unfortunately, the Oil Company execs are not about to take this threat to their bank accounts lying down, so they plan a trap.  After the next tanker roundup, they track Aquaboy and lure him in to an ambush with a look-a-like for his girlfriend, Marita, who looks just like Mera.  I half suspect that Frank Robbins didn’t know what Mera’s name was or when she showed up.  Either way, it seems that Arthur definitely has a type!  The crew of a tanker filled with nitroglycerin(!) hang “Marita” from their rigging, and in a pretty cool sequence, Aquaboy jumps from one leaping dolphin to another dolphin to board the ship in great, swashbuckling fashion.  Yet, as he’s about to free the fire-tressed femme fatale, she frees herself and he is trapped in a net instead!

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I hear some classic, Errol Flynn-esq swashbuckling music in my head when I see this scene…

When Superboy arrives, the corrupt captain orders him to swear to leave the company alone, or they’ll drop Aquaboy into the nitro and blow him to kingdom come (no, not that one).  The young Marine Marvel is adamant that his partner can’t give in, no matter what happens to him, but the Boy of Steel has plans of his own.  He races away, seeming to give in, only to turn back and grab the Prince of the Sea, shielding him in his cape, and hurling the pair through the ship’s hull at super speed, so fast that they pierce the nitro before it can react.  They’re deep underwater by the time the ship blows, and all that is left is to do is haul the would-be blackmailers back to their employers to let them know who’s really boss.

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This is a fun adventure with an environmental focus that is just tailor-made for its guest-star.  Aquaman is a character who is perfect for tackling environmental themes such as pollution and man’s impact on this planet.  It’s fascinating to see that connection made this early on.  It’s also really fun to see the young heroes acting as champions of justice, rather than upholders of law.  It looks like there is some effort to create a more mature sense of morality in these characters, getting beyond the law=good paradigm that dominated portrayals in the Silver Age.  It’s also rather fitting for this to happen with a couple of fiery teen heroes who might naturally be a bit more rebellious and impetuous.

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Here we’ve got our two protagonists breaking laws, violating international borders, and generally carrying on a personal crusade without the slightest shred of justification other than their sense of right and wrong.  Superboy, for his part, is much closer in line with the early portrayals of the character during the Golden Age, where he was a champion of the oppressed against the rich and powerful, an interpretation that I understand has made a comeback in recent years.

I would have liked to see more of the two teens’ personalities, as there isn’t much to differentiate them as Super and Aqua BOYs rather than their full-grown counterparts, but that’s a minor complaint.  I’m also not crazy about the rather unequal partnership between our two heroes.  Aquaboy doesn’t get a whole lot to do, and he’s rather overshadowed by his super-partner.  That’s a constant problem for Superman, though.  Despite those minor criticisms, this is an enjoyable, entertaining read with some really intriguing trappings.  I’ll give this story a good score of 4 Minutemen.

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P.S.: Interestingly, this issue also came with a one-page brief on Superboy’s chronological setting, an acknowledgement of the sliding time-scale of DC Comics, which I found curious.  The editor notes that, because Superman hasn’t aged, his youth has to keep moving forward, so they’ve updated the setting fro his adventures as Superboy.  Notably, they did so inside a story, where the Boy of Tomorrow time-traveled, returning to a different year than he left, which is a clever, if problematic way to handle the issue.  I bet this is one of the first times something like this has been addressed directly.


Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #107


lois_lane_107“The Snow-Woman Wept!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Werner Roth
Inker: Vince Colletta

“My Executioner Loves Me”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

Our Lois Lane story today isn’t quite as gobsmackingly profound and compelling as our last one, (how could it be?) but it’s a fun, charming, and imaginative read.  I continue to think I may have misjudged Robert Kanigher.  He wrote a lot of clunkers that I suffered through, but I’m starting to suspect that he’s coming into his own now.  I suppose time will tell.  At any rate, let’s check out this story, and y’all can judge for yourselves.

We begin at the office of the Daily Planet, where our old friends Clark Kent and Lois Lane are getting their assignments from Perry White, assignments that aren’t sitting too well with the girl reporter.  While Clark has been tasked with ferreting out the secret behind a Nobel Prize winner’s new research, Lois has been given a story on Superman being made the king of Raleigh College’s ‘Winter Carnival.’  Fun fact: apparently Lois graduated from Raleigh College.  Well, alma mater or not, Lois isn’t having any of this, and she yells discrimination at Perry.

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The exchange is a bit surprising and rather entertaining.  Perry’s unperturbed response, “don’t wave the women’s lib flag at me,” cracked me up.  There’s a touch of social concern in that scene, downplayed because the lady journalist’s main motivation is her professional pride.  She’s driven by the desire to get the biggest and best story, a classic example of the intrepid reporter archetype, and a nice return to her roots as a character.  It’s interesting to see Lois display some of the fire and independence that I’ve always loved about the character, traits she carries throughout the issue but which have been absent in other portrayals.

When she and Clark arrive at Raleigh, she meets a snow sculptor, a college romeo who tries to put the moves on her (bold kid!), but Lois lets the boy down easy, posing for a sculpture for him and telling him that he’ll meet a nice girl his own age before too long.  Meanwhile, Clark manages to get an interview with Professor Bridnell and his assistant, Dr. Tort.  We learn that the assistant is actually a defector from behind the Iron Curtain, and then the good professor explains his research.

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Apparently he’s invented a serum that can turn an air-breathing creature into a water-breathing one, and he explains how his invention will allow humanity to colonize the seas and escape the damage done to the surface world, giving a new lease on life to society’s cast-offs.  Wow, I bet Aquaman would have something to say about that!  In a surprising concession both to the stability of the setting and to realism, the Professor notes that there are years of testing ahead of the usability of his invention, which I enjoyed.

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Pictures: An Atlantean nightmare

Bridnell shows Clark a pistol-like device that can administer his serum and explains that he’s built an antidote into it as well, just in case.  However, when the reporter leaves, Dr. Tort suddenly attacks his employer, revealing himself to be a communist spy!  He meets with a team sent to retrieve him and the professor’s research, and he explains the potential of truly aquatic soldiers who could stealthily disable America’s nuclear subs, destroying our retaliatory ability and enabling a successful Soviet first strike!

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Just then, Lois happens to come snooping, hoping to scoop Clark.  She overhears Tort’s plans, and he uses the invention on her.  Unfortunately, the untested device has an unexpected effect, turning her into a statue of snow!  They hide her with the other snow sculptures on the quad, thinking that the sun will dispose of the evidence for them, but when Superman arrives for the carnival, he notices her ‘melting’ in a strange way that almost looks like…tears!  He touches the liquid and realizes it is salty, deducing that something bizarre had happened to Lois.  That would be a bigger leap if Lois didn’t end up in crazy situations on a daily basis.

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Seeking to get help for her, the Metropolis Marvel rushes the frozen female to Prof. Bridnell’s lab, only to interrupt Tort and the commies (sound like a 50s rock band!) preparing to sneak out in costumes among the carnival crowd.  They hit him with the same device, and the Man of Steel turns into the Man of Snow!  Apparently, he’s suffering from a mysterious occasional weakness which began in the “Kryptonite Nevermore” story we’ll encounter in the next post.  Frozen solid, the hero can’t do much to help his situation.  In a desperate maneuver, he uses his heat vision on the lab’s lead door, hoping that it will reflect enough heat to set his molecules back in motion.  This succeeds, but Lois is still trapped in an icy prison.  The Man of Tomorrow captures the commie crooks and uses the Prof.’s invention to restore his lady love in another gamble, as he’s uncertain if it will work.  Fortunately, the device cures her, and Lois and Superman play king and queen of the Winter Carnival.

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I have to say, I’m enjoying these Lois Lane issues much more than I expected.  I’m liking the portrayal of Lois herself, and the more sedate pace of these yarns allows an opportunity for character development and the chance to meet some interesting secondary characters.  This one is just a mostly straightforward adventure, but the story comes with a good deal of personality and charm, with the addition of little touches like Lois’s frustration at her assignment and the festivities of the Winter Carnival, not to mention the Cold War paranoia of the nefarious Soviet operatives and their apocalyptic dreams.  Speaking of which, it’s interesting to see the Cold War tensions raise their heads, as we really haven’t seen much of that in recent comics.

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Werner Roth returns to the art chores on this story, and I am impressed once more.  His work is just lovely and detailed, full of individual personality and distinctive faces.  He does a great job on the people, but he also turns out fine work on the very different scenes featuring the destruction of the commie plans.  In terms of the plot, the techno-babble is just a tad stretched between the initial concept and the snow-statue effects of the ray, but I’m willing to give it a pass because it mostly works in the usual comic book sense.  I don’t see why a ray designed to make someone a water-breather would turn them into snow, but I suppose unexpected side-effects are a thing.  I liked the range of imaginative ideas in this book, from underwater colonies to Soviet schemes.  There’s a healthy dose of wonder in it.  So, all in all, I’ll give this enjoyable little tale 4 Minutemen.

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“My Executioner Loves Me”


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The saga of Rose and Thorn continues, and it also continues to fascinate me, perhaps a tad more than the stories themselves entirely merit.  The concept is just so innovative that it transcends the material to a certain extent.  Yet, despite the fact that these stories are crammed into eight page backups, they have the advantage of a rolling continuity, one tale leading directly into the next.  We’re definitely not seeing an established status quo, rather a constantly evolving, even if in short hops, narrative.  That’s pretty unusual for this period.

This particular offering opens in media res, with the Thorn being chased by a trio of the 100’s gunmen, and it seems that she has a few more tricks up her nonexistent sleeves!  She has developed a Batman-esq utility belt, which she calls her ‘Thorn Arsenal Belt,’ containing various small ‘thorns’ that carry different gimmicks.  One might ask where she would get such things, especially since she couldn’t do any of her vigilante shopping in her other pesonality, but it is fun enough that I’m willing to let that slide for the moment.  In this instance, she throws some concussion grenades at her pursuers’ car, putting it out of commission.  She then handles the thugs themselves with her fits after tossing a smoke grenade for cover.  I have to say, I’m not a huge fan of Ross Andru’s art on this feature, but this action scene looks great.

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The Thorn has developed another new gimmick, as she is marking the 100’s killers off, one by one, leaving numbered calling cards with her victims when she leaves them for the police.  It’s a cool and different idea that helps to highlight how the Thorn differs from other heroes.  She’s not out for abstracts like justice; she’s out for revenge, plain and simple, a visceral, primitive motivation, one that drives her peculiar madness.

The next day, we once again check in with the secret head of the 100, Vince Adams, who also happens to be Rose’s boss.  The docile half of this particular dynamic duo accidentally walks in on a meeting between Adams and the latest killer to be assigned to the Thorn’s contract, and then Kanigher briefly checks in on the other subplots, Rose’s ironic burgeoning romance with Adams, the golden coffin, and her complicated relationship with her father’s partner, Danny.

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Then, night falls, and we’re back to the Thorn!  She heads out on patrol, only to be ambushed on the docks by the new assassin, a gentlemanly gunman whose scruples allow her to get the drop on him, dumping him overboard.  He strikes his head and begins to drown, and Thorn has a nice moment of indecision where she debates whether or not to let him die.  What finally makes up her mind is the thought that her father wouldn’t want her to become a murderer, which seems very fitting.

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The Baleful Beauty dives in and saves the guy, which blows him away.  The girl realizes that she saw him meeting with Adams, and she wonders what he was doing at the funeral parlor.  As for the waterlogged gunman, he is moved by her risking her life for him right after he tried to kill her, and the fellow, Beau, falls for her.  He asks the Thorn to run away with him, promising he’ll protect her.  Just then, more assassins attack, and now Beau’s neck is on the block as well for failing in his mission.  The pair rush to his car, and they engage in a running fight, finally eluding their pursuers with the help of some ‘thorn-nails’ that shred their antagonists’ tires.

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Beau is making plans all the while, and promises to smuggle the pair of them out of the country.  They share a kiss, and then the Vengeful Vixen leaps out of the car, leaving her hitman turned hunk to realize that she’s dumped him in front of the police station!  She tells him that he’ll be safe from the 100 in jail, and that “I forgot myself for the moment!  But I’m the Thorn!  And you’re number 22!”  Man, that is cold!  It also happens to be extremely awesome.  I love that touch, and really, that whole little episode, condensed though it is.  Finally, the Thorn heads back home and changes back to Rose.  Yet, her hand was grazed by a bullet in the fight, and Rose wakes up wondering how she scratched her hand.  That’s an intriguing development, and I am looking forward to see what Kanigher does with these seeds he’s planting!

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These eight pages are just packed with story and with action.  Kanigher is stuffing plot and development in hand-over-fist, and its’ a bit strained at times, but it works surprisingly well on the whole.  The story is just so darn enjoyable, and the beats are so interesting, that you can’t help but forgive it for its limitations.  I found this little tale very readable, and I’m intrigued by the setup Kanigher has established.  I’m definitely in to see where this goes.  This series is just good, clean adventure fiction, but with a really fascinating twist.  I’ll give this chapter of the Rose and Thorn saga a solid 4 Minutemen, and if it had more room to breathe, I’d have to think it would climb even higher.

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The Head-Blow Headcount:

Aquamanhead.jpgBatmanhead.jpgshowcase-88-fnvf-jasons-quest0robin2 - Copy.jpgPhantom_Stranger_05.jpgrobin2 - Copy.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpgAquamanhead.jpg3072564469_1_3_hCmU7jwq.jpg

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Sadly, Aquaman adds ANOTHER appearance on the wall of shame, making two in a row!  The Sea King is not off to a great start in 1971.  Of course, things are going to get worse for him soon, when his book gets cancelled, but I suppose there’s no sense borrowing trouble.  I wonder who the next star of the Headcount will be!


That does it for these books.  I hope you’ll join me again soon for the last two books of January 1971.  Thanks for reading, and please feel free to share you thoughts and insights in a comment!  Until next time, keep the heroic ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: October 1970 (Part 5)

DC-Style-Guide-1

Welcome to another edition of Into the Bronze Age!  Today we’re covering the first appearance of the unique heroine, Rose and Thorn, which is pretty cool, but much more excitingly, we’re also going to encounter the triumphant return of Jack “the King” Kirby to DC Comics in his inaugural issue of Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen!  We’ve finally reached the event that DC had been plugging for months.  I’m definitely looking forward to covering the unfolding saga of the Fourth World in all of its bizarre, insanely creative glory.  I’ve included some general reflections on Kirby and his career, so this post is a bit longer than normal.  Let’s see what these books have in store for us!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what its all about.

Roll Call (You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #393
  • Adventure Comics #398
  • Aquaman #52
  • Detective Comics #404
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #80
  • Phantom Stranger #9
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #105
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #133 (Jack Kirby’s debut!)
  • Superman #230
  • Teen Titans #29

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #105


lois_lane_105Death House Honeymoon!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

“Night of the Thorn”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

I was quite uncertain as to how this book was going to go, but I have to say that I was pretty pleasantly surprised.  First off, it was a Robert Kanigher script, which hasn’t worked out too well so far in my experience.  Second, it was Lois Lane, which I didn’t really expect to be reading to begin with.  Yet, the inclusion of Rose and Thorn intrigued me enough to pick it up, and I’m glad I did.  The story inside is actually fairly enjoyable, though there is one glaring problem caused by Kanigher apparently forgetting Superman’s powers.  I suppose there are a lot of them to keep track of!  Still, I think this new character is promising.

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Our first glimpse of the mysterious botanical beauty is in the form of flyers dropped all over Metropolis, informing the members of the ruthless criminal organization known as the ‘100’ that she is out to destroy them  These flyers contain a picture of the beautiful Thorn, as well as the challenge, which seems somewhat short-sighted.  Clark Kent and Lois Lane discover these circulars and are split on how to treat this character.  Lois wants to chase down the story, while Mr. Mild Mannered is afraid that if they do, they’ll make this woman a target for the 100, though it rather seems like that particular cat is already well out of its bag.  We also get a bit of somewhat unusual misogyny from Perry White, as Clark convinces him the story is too dangerous for a woman.  Instead, the editor tells Lois that a convicted murderer named Johnny Adonis, awaiting his fate on death row, has asked to see her in his final hours.

Once she arrives (Superman having saved her from a car wreck on the way, just to stay in practice), the girl reporter discovers that the convict has a very unusual request.  He wants her to marry him for the short time he has before his date with the chair.  Adonis points out that she can have the marriage annulled as soon as he is gone, and then he declares that she owes him a debt.  We discover that he had saved her life years ago when she fell through the ice of a frozen lake while on vacation.  Feeling that she owes the killer her life, Lois agrees.  Of course, there’s a small dose of obligatory drama with Superman because of her choice, but nonetheless, the deathhouse is soon the scene of a grim and joyless wedding.  Yet, the wedding is just a smokescreen, and as soon as the Man of Steel has left in disgust, the prisoners stage an escape, using the new bride as a hostage!

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Meanwhile, the Metropolis Marvel encounters the enigmatic vigilante known as the Thorn for the first time.  He finds her taking it to a trio of 100 thugs and intervenes just in time to save her from a bullet.  Before he can talk with her, though, she vanishes into the night.  That’s right.  She slips away and hides in the shadows….hides from the man with X-Ray vision.  In the shadows.  Are shadows made of lead in the DCU?  This is the only real problem with the story.  Apparently Kanigher forgets how Superman’s powers work.

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“Shadows!  My kryptonite…err…wait a minute…”

Next we cut back to the escaping prisoners, who, clear of pursuit, decide to dispose of their hostage.  They push their car into the river with Lois inside, and her pleas for help seem to fall on deaf ears, her new “husband” coldly ignoring her plight.  Yet, just then Thorn arrives, pulling the reporter out of the river and attracting the bullets of the surprised convicts.  That’s just too much for Mr. Adonis, though, and he turns on his fellows, struck with a sudden attack of conscience.  He gets a few of them, but they get him as well.  Fortunately, Superman arrives just in time to stop the rest of the gang, though too late to save Lois’s new groom, who dies in her arms.  Her work done, Thorn sneaks off into the fog, and we get the dumbest line in the book, as captions tell us “vainly Superman stares through the curtaining vapors.”  Really?  It’s a shame Superman doesn’t have any powers that let him do things like see through fog or shadows.

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It’s really silly, but despite that goofy little oversight, this first chapter is pretty entertaining.  We don’t see much of Thorn (or Rose for that matter) in this first tale, but what we see is enough to pique our interest, as she is a relentless, capable crusader, pursuing this 100 organization.  It’s not a bad introduction, and the next story will fill us in on who she is.  This headline plot seems like it’s going to be pretty goofy, with the gimmicky “Lois is marrying a prisoner” thing, but it actually works out pretty well.  Lois does have an obligation to the guy, and though his request is absurd, Kanigher manages to make the case for it at least well enough for the world of comics.  In context, it’s less absurd than Superman losing Thorn in the fog.  We don’t get to know Adonis well enough for his death to have much of an impact, but his little arc is moderately interesting.  All in all, it’s a solid story, worth an average 3 Minutemen.

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“Night of the Thorn”


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This is the real meat of the issue, the backup tale that gives us the origin of the fascinating character Rose and Thorn.  How can Rose AND Thorn be one character?  Well, that’s the gimmick, and it’s a good one.  Her origin even makes ‘comic book sense,’ which is enough for me in this context.  It’s a standard superhero origin, but with a great twist.

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We first meet Rose Forrest at the grave of her father, police detective Phil Forrest.  She obligingly fills us in on what happened to her dearly departed dad, who was on the police force of Metropolis and who was investigating the activities of the vicious new criminal organization, the 100.  He and his partner, Danny, make enough trouble for the gang that the hoods put a price on their heads.  Eventually, they manage to take Forrest out in a fiery running gunfight which left him at the bottom of a river.  For some reason, Danny seems to think it would be a good idea to bring his partner’s daughter to see daddy get fished out of the river, but the sight is too much for her, and she suffers a breakdown.

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While in the hospital, the doctors observe her sleepwalking, and they helpfully tell us that “her ego personality as Rose is incapable of violence[,] but her id, her unconscious self, is different!”  Now, that’s mostly nonsense, but the result is that, once she is released, she begins to live a double life.  Every night she wakens, no longer Rose, but with a new personality in control of her body.  This Thorn persona crosses through a convenient secret passage in her brownstone home to an abandoned and even more convenient costume shop in a neighboring building.  There she dons a wig and dresses in a strange disguise, then takes to the street to exact her revenge on the killers who took her father from her.  On this particular night, she interrupts the gang’s ambush of Danny, disabling the attackers, and then running off before the stunned policeman can ask her any questions.

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She ends the night by chasing another set of killers into a bowling alley and bowling a very unlikely strike, pitting bowling balls against bullets and somehow not becoming a bullet-ridden corpse.  It’s a bit silly, but it’s entertaining enough.  The night spent, she returns home and transforms once more into the passive and peaceful Rose, who remembers only a strange, disjointed dream.

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This is a fun story, but it’s real strength lies in the power of the concept rather than the particular execution.  It’s a great idea, and I am very much looking forward to see where it goes from here.  I was particularly surprised by the fact that the portrayal of the main character’s psychosis, though handled with traditional comic book exaggeration and sensationalism, is actually more or less accurate.  You see, Lady Grey has a doctorate in psychology, and while this particular type of thing is not her area of expertise, when I ran it past her, she told me that dissociative identity disorder (the official name for what is colloquially known as multiple personality disorder) can work more or less like this.  I was quite astounded that the science in the story wasn’t complete nonsense.  That is, of course, ignoring the sleepwalking component, as the two are unrelated.  So, good on Kanigher!  This backup is too brief to do much more than set up the concept, but it succeeds at that well enough, though the last encounter in the bowling alley is a bit of an odd fit, not quite meshing with the rest of the tale.  I’ll give this one 3 Minutemen as well, and we’ll have to see what else Rose and Thorn have in store for us.

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Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #133


jimmy_olsen_133“Jimmy Olsen, Superman’s Pal, Brings Back the Newsboy Legion!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Pencilers: Jack Kirby and Al Plastino
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: John Costanza
Editors: E. Nelson Bridwell and Murray Boltinoff

Okay gang, strap in for the beautiful, gloriously insane madness that is Jack Kirby’s Fourth World.  The most mad, and strangely, at times, also the most glorious, is his Jimmy Olsen!  So we’re in for a wild ride.

I love Jack Kirby.  He’s hands-down my favorite comics creator and, arguably, the most important figure in the history of superhero comics.  I’ve read most of his genre-defining work at Marvel produced with Stan Lee, and it is a fascinating experience to read through those amazing early Marvel books from the dawn of the Silver Age, watching step by step as that unparalleled team built the Marvel Universe line by line, panel by panel, but even more so because at the same time they were transforming superhero comics forever.  The work is often silly and Silver Age-ish, undeveloped and simplistic, and always overwritten.  Stan Lee never meet an unnecessary caption that he didn’t like, and calling his prose purple is like calling the sun a candle!  Nonetheless, there has never been an era like that one.  If you’re interested in the legendary King of Comics, let me recommend this fascinating documentary about his life and work.

Stan and Jack were the ultimate creative partnership, generating countless concepts, a seemingly bottomless well of imagination and innovation.  Not all of their ideas were hits, and there was probably a dud or two for every success in those early days.  Yet, they created entire worlds of possibilities, and their successors have had long and illustrious careers merely mapping the landscapes first explored by comic’s most dynamic duo.

Unfortunately, (or fortunately, for DC Comics) that golden age didn’t last.  Marvel in general and Stan Lee specifically didn’t treat ‘the King’ properly for a peasant, much less for comics’ royalty.  There’s a good deal of ‘he said,’ ‘she said’ about the events surrounding Kirby’s departure from Marvel Comics, and I won’t get into the ugly details of the matter.  While what I’ve read has made me more sympathetic to Kirby than Lee, the real details of those days are probably lost to history, and there’s no sense fighting ancient battles all over again.

Suffice to say, the man who had at least half credit for building the Marvel Universe found that familiar space no longer home and set out for new horizons.  He came to DC Comics, and the company was only too thrilled to have such a comics luminary working for them.  Kirby did not come empty handed either.  He brought with him an entire new universe full of characters, concepts, and wonder without end.  The King was given the opportunity to explore this new world, though the folks in charge never quite understood the idea, which made them continuously nervous and eventually contributed to the early demise of the various Fourth World books.  They were definitely different, and the books teemed with life and creativity, just as the early Marvel books had.  This was an era of imagination much like that earlier age, with Kirby pitching out idea after idea, filling each book with eye-popping, astounding sights.  Just like his earlier work, they weren’t all hits, but they expanded the DC Universe tremendously.

As part of his new contract, Kirby was tasked with salvaging DC’s lowest selling book, Jimmy Olsen, the price he must pay for the chance to bring his new ideas to life.  There’s an apocryphal story that Jack told DC, ‘give me your lowest-selling book and I’ll turn it into your highest-selling book.’  True or not, DC didn’t have much to lose, because, much like the other Superman books, as we’ve seen, Jimmy Olsen was stuck in a Silver Age-ish rut.  Its stories were formulaic and silly, and readers were tiring of the routine.  Kirby brought something entirely new to the series, breathing new life into a book on its last legs, and that is where we begin today.  Prepare yourselves.  The journey is a wild and wonderful one.

One of the most noteworthy features of this first issue is the return of a previous Jack Kirby creation, the Newsboy Legion, to the pages of DC Comics.  It’s quite fitting that Kirby’s return should also coincide with his reviving of an old concept from the 40s, one that was near and dear to his heart.  These plucky kids were one of the many ‘kid gang’ groups that crowded into comics during the Golden Age, and Kirby drew on his own experience in a neighborhood gang to create them.  Originally, they were a group of orphans who sold newspapers to survive and got into all kinds of adventures.

This new set are the descendants of the original, which is a fun angle, and they are working for Galaxy Broadcasting, the new parent company of the Daily Planet, as child reporters…because that makes sense and is totally legal.  They include a fun set of walking archetypes: Gabby, the loquacious one, Big Words, the brainy one, Tommy, the normal one, and Scrapper Jr., the tough one.  Unfortunately, the King has added in a new member, likely in an effort to add some diversity to the cast, named, and I kid you not, “Flipper Dipper,” who goes everywhere dressed in a S.C.U.B.A. diving outfit, complete with mask and fins.  It’s…an odd choice.  He’s a ridiculous character who can only contribute to a story through the force of plot.  All the other kids have a fairly normal, conventional gimmick.  What does this poor schmuck get?  Diving.

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Inexplicably, the kids have built an incredibly hi-tech vehicle called the ‘Whiz Wagon,’ capable of flying, underwater travel, and a host of other incredible feats.  Morgan Edge, the mysteriously sinister new president of Galaxy funded the construction of the vehicle, which was designed by resident genius, Big Words.  This is just number one of the crazy, imaginative concepts that Kirby is going to squeeze into this issue.  Take a look at this thing.  It looks like a suped-up version of the ‘o-matic’ 60s Fantasticar.  It is certainly neat looking.  After all, no-one could design a gadget like Jack Kirby!

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The Legion, led by Jimmy Olsen, are going to use this fancy contraption to travel to a mysterious place called the ‘Wild Area,’ an ill-defined spot of unspecified dangers, there to plumb its secrets.  It’s supposed to be wildly unsafe, so, naturally, they’re sending kids to cover it.  This doesn’t sit too well with Clark Kent, who confronts the slimy Morgan Edge about his choice, but his efforts to protect the youths are rebuffed.  Edge insists that the inhabitants of the Wild Area, the “Hairies,” don’t trust anyone over twenty-five, meaning that the crew has to be young.  As you’ve probably already guessed, this story is going to be about the generation gap, in insane Kirby fashion.

Leaving the office, the disguised Man of Steel is run down by a car, which, of course leaves him unscathed.  It seems that Morgan Edge has been annoyed by his questions, and the car was full of Intergang’s hired killers.  Still following me?  We’re only a few pages in!  With Kent pretending to be home recovering from his “accident,” the Whiz Wagon sets out on an incredible journey by sea, sky, and road, heading to the ill-defined Wild Area, where they encounter a group of hi-tech bikers called ‘The Outsiders’ that only Jack Kirby could have imagined.

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They ride crazy, over-designed bikes, wear outlandish gear more fitting for space travel than cycle riding, and employ sci-fi weapons.  Jimmy and his youthful pals take fire in the Wagon, and so they immediately do the sensible thing and attack these heavily-armed Star Wars rejects barehanded.  Their insane courage is rewarded rather than earning them messy deaths, and when Jimmy knocks out the gang’s leader, they immediately put him in charge.

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Following the ancient rule, in his own book, Jimmy’s sort of awesome.

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Meanwhile, Superman sets out to find the Legion, sure they are in over their heads.  He employs a power I’m pretty sure he’s never evinced before or since, as he uses his heat vision to detect the afterimage of the heat created by the Wagon’s passage.  Oookay.  I hope that if I’ve got any readers who are Superman experts, they’ll correct me if I’m wrong about that, but it seems like a weird addition.  Arriving in the Wild Area, the Metropolis Marvel discovers the home of the ‘Outsiders,’ only to be attacked by the gang, now lead by his old friend!  Before the two can straighten things out, one of the bikers shoots the Man of Tomorrow with a weird ray, conveniently packed with kryptonite…that this random guy just had..in case Superman ever showed up.  It’s a very Silver Age-ish moment, silly in the extreme and an example of that kryptonite-as-plot-device trend I hate.

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Well, the Man of Steel recovers and meets the Legion in the wondrous, Kirby-esq city known as ‘the Habitat.’  It’s a glorious full page splash, and it makes absolutely no sense.  Superman points out that a ‘dropout society’ like the Outsiders could never have built anything like it, but the origins of this bizarre arboreal urban sprawl will remain a mystery for the moment.  With things calmed down, the hero meets with his young friend, who apologizes for the zapping and fills him in on the Legion’s assignment, ‘The Mountain of Judgement.’  You’ve just got to love the portentous names that Kirby assigns everything.  One of the bikers tells them what little that they know about it, which isn’t much.  Apparently it’s some type of gargantuan mobile structure at the end of some type of dangerous path called ‘the Zoomway.’  Just then, a tremendous sound shakes the entire city, heralding the presence of the Mountain of Judgement!

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I want to live in Jack Kirby’s world.

Okay, catch your breath, gang!  This utterly mad issue was just the start, and what a start it was!  Kirby is simultaneously introducing a new supporting cast for Jimmy, establishing a bizarre and exciting new setting, and planting the seeds for the Fourth World.  This issue, as irrational and silly as it is in many regards, is just absolutely chock full of imagination and wonder.  That’s perhaps Kirby’s greatest strength, the conjuration of wonder, and it will be a common accomplishment in the Fourth World books, even at their weakest. He manages it here, with the strange societies of the Wild Area, the mysterious, alien structures of the Habitat, and the pure ‘Kribyness’ of the visuals.  I’ve left a lot out of my summary, because there is no way to capture all of this colorful craziness.

I was not very fond of these early Jimmy Olsen issues when I first read them some years ago.  All of the sillier elements grated too much on me, but I’ve developed more appreciation for such wild stories in the interim.  As bizarre as this issue is, it is also undeniably fun and imaginative.  It’s even zanier and even more creative than an outing with Zany Haney.  It has plenty of weaknesses, with the stupid kryptonite convenience at the top of the list.  It’s also worth noting that, while Jack Kirby was an artist of unparalleled skill and creativity, with his talents matched only by the bottomless productivity of his ever-working imagination, his skills as a dialog writer are not quite as legendary.  The 60s slang that fills the book, while not as horrible as some of the earlier Teen Titans issues, can be pretty cringe-inducing.

The whole generation gap angle of the story also feels a bit dated, even in 1970.  The angst of generational conflict, which will be felt more next issue, bores me.  I suppose that’s because I was an angsty teenager once and am now keenly aware of just how stupid I was. Of course, as we’ve often noted, Superman is certainly a fitting symbol for the established order, having remained almost entirely unchanged for years, so I suppose there is something more clever here than I had really given Kirby credit for.  In the context of the social relevance trends, the revamping of characters, and the greater social engagement sweeping through DC Comics, this theme is actually quite fitting.  Who is more a symbol of the previous generation than Superman?  Of course, Jimmy is not really the first character I’d pick for a rebellious avatar of teen identity.  Still, I’ll have to see how the other issues strike me.  Perhaps they’ll read better on the second pass.

The dropout societies of the Wild Area, and even the name that Edge gives them, the ‘Hairies,’ obviously references the hippies of the 60s, but they are much more exciting.  Hippies with ray guns and Kirby-tech might even be moderately tolerable.  Nonetheless, the final result is intriguing.  You couldn’t read this issue and not want to know just what in the blue blazes was going on.  And that is nothing to laugh at.  There’s an undeniable charm and frenetic energy to this story, so despite its goofy elements, I’ll give it 3.5 Minutemen.  We’ll see better Kirby stories before long, but even with its weaknesses, this is a fascinating beginning!

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Well my friends, that’s it for this milestone edition of Into the Bronze Age!  The King is here, long live the King!  Please join me again soon for our last two issues of the month, which promise to be interesting at the very least.  I hope that y’all are enjoying our trek as much as I am.  Until next time, keep the heroic spirit alive!

Into the Bronze Age: September 1970 (Part 1)

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Hello dear readers, and welcome to another installment of Into the Bronze Age.  I imagine that many of you out there are thunderstruck by the results of the American presidential election, no matter who you favored.  This entire election has been bizarre beyond words.  Many of you likely feel like the world is spinning madly out of control.  Perhaps some of you are feeling pleased and hopeful.  Whatever the case, I imagine we could all use a break from politics and from a national discourse that has grown ever more poisonous and vicious.  Don’t worry, I’m not going to talk about politics.  I’m neither going to lament nor cheer.  No, instead, I’m going to publish this post about, of all things, 1970s comic books.  What a thing to do at a moment in history that, whatever comes, is sure to be remembered for years.  Yet, it’s at times like this I think that these silly little superhero books can do us the most good.  They are bright, hopeful, and they espouse, at their best, the only true heroism, the self-sacrificial love that marks the highest apex of human virtue, mirroring as it does divine virtue.  They remind us that we are at our best, not when we are doing for ourselves, but when we are doing for others.  They are a good escapist refuge from an ugly and uncharitable world, but they are also a reminder that humanity is capable of good things, beauty, joy, and laugher.

So, without further ado, welcome to September 1970.  Let’s see what awaits us within, shall we?

This month in history:

  • Palestinian terrorists hijack ten different planes during what is known as the “Black September” civil war in Jordan
  • Psychedelic drug evangelist and all-around wack job Timothy Leary escaped from prison
  • IBM announces System 370 computer
  • USSR launches Luna 16; returns samples from lunar Sea of Fertility
  • President Nixon requests 1,000 new FBI agents for college campuses
  • Unrest and conflict continues in Ireland

We have a tie between two extremely awesome songs at the top of the charts this month, with both Edwin Star’s “War” and Diana Ross’s “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough.”  These are two very different songs, but they provide a nice cross section of the time.  “War” is certainly a very striking piece, given the conflicts filling our list above.

It is certainly an interesting month in history, with all kinds of crazy things going on.  I learned a lot reading about this month, and I was fascinated by both the Black September conflict and the bat-guano insane life of Timothy Leary.  The guy was like a real-life supervillain.  It’s very interesting for those of us on the path to the Bronze Age that we see evidence in this flurry of skyjackings of the trend we heard about all the way back in Batman #219.  Clearly calling this period “The Golden Age of Skyjacking” is rather appropriate.  The Space Race continues as well, giving us something a bit more positive happening in the skies, but there are still signs of unrest everywhere.  Well, enough of all this real-world drama, let’s talk about some superheroes!

Roll Call (You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #392
  • Batman #225
  • Brave and the Bold #91
  • Detective Comics #403
  • G.I. Combat #143
  • Green Lantern #79
  • Justice League #83
  • Showcase #93
  • The Flash #200
  • World’s Finest #196

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.

Action Comics #392

action_comics_392“The Shame of the Super Son”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

“The Legionnaires Who Never Were!”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Win Mortimer
Inker: Jack Abel

Once again, this issue follows what is becoming a familiar pattern.  The Headlining Superman tale is just goofy Silver Age fare, but the Legion backup is just plain good.  The Superman tale continues the Saga of the Super Sons and repeats many of the silly domestic farce elements that annoyed me with the last one.  Once again, everyone seems to just spend all day and night in their costumes, even when doing the most prosaic and pedestrian activities, giving us some really unintentionally funny panels.  I’m actually reminded a bit of the Tick…

In our last issue, we ended on the cliffhanger of Superman apparently taking away his goofus of a son’s powers with gold kryptonite.  He makes this pretty huge choice with ridiculous suddenness, deciding that his hard-luck screw-up of a teenage son, or, you know, a teenager, was too dangerous and incompetent to have super powers.  Apparently Clark doesn’t remember what it was like to be 13 or so.  After all, I know I know I certainly didn’t have everything together at that age…of course, I still don’t, but that’s neither here nor there!  This issue picks back up with the elder Supes as he returns home, sullen and silent.  His son runs off as soon as they are home, justifiably angry at his father for, you know, stripping his powers away permanently without so much as a heads-up.  I have to say, this surprised me a bit.  I was sure that the previous issue’s cliffhanger would be a cheat of some sort and that this one would reveal the kid’s powers weren’t permanently lost just because he’s a klutz, seeing as how that would be insane and incredibly cruel.  I was certain that this issue would reveal it was all just a lesson for the boy, but no, Kanigher amps up the crazy by barreling ahead quite earnestly.

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And Kanigher cranks up Superman’s jerk dial a dozen more notches, as the Man of Tomorrow wordlessly brushes past his wife, who can tell something is wrong, and locks himself in his study, while the wife, increasingly panicked by his complete freaking silence, repeatedly demands to know what happened to her son.  Wow, you’re just bad all around at this family stuff, aren’t you Supes?  So, what does Mrs. Man of Steel do?  She runs across the street to the neighboring mansion of Batman and asks him for help.  In so doing, she interrupts the Caped Crusader lounging in his den, watching TV in full costume.  That’s got to be one of the most ridiculous images in the book, but it has plenty of competition.

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Check out Batman’s swinging 60s den!

The Dark Knight (not so dark here) gets the story out of his friend, who has NOW decided to be remorseful for ruining his son’s life (a little late there!).  Next we get a montage of scenes where the former Boy of Steel gets humiliated in various ways, all while continuing to wear his costume as he engages in even more normal activities.  He nearly drowns while swimming (in a cape!), has to pick up his date on a Bat-bike (the pedal-powered kind), and gets one-uped by Bat-boy.  There’s a lot of silly in these pages.

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Things take a turn when Superman is ambushed by a bunch of criminals from the Generic Gang who happen to have gotten their hands on the most plentiful element in the Silver Age DC Universe, kryptonite!  The Super Son, having lost his powers, is somehow unaffected, and he manages to free his not-so-super father.  I’d have sympathized if he had left him to the crooks.

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This prompts a change of heart in the Man of Tomorrow, who brings his son to the Bottle City of Kandor for his 14th birthday.  While there, they don a set of bracelets that, supposedly signify their bond.  When they come back to the Fortress, they discover one of the dangerous zoo animals escaped , and Superman doesn’t seem to have the power to stop it.  His son belts the beast and discovers that his powers have returned.  Apparently, the bracelets actually gave the elder’s powers to the younger.  The issue ends with father and son reconciled and the Man of Steel, now powerless, retiring and letting his son take over the family world-saving business.  It really seems like he got there the hard way.

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Well, this was a bonkers issue, picking up from the last bonkers issue.  Superman really comes off pretty terribly, both with his ridiculously abrupt and insanely severe punishment of his son and with his callous treatment of his justifiably frantic wife.  The ending would be heartwarming, if it wasn’t made necessary by the Man of Steel’s being inhumanely cruel in the first place.  In the end, this is more or less what you might expect of such a story.  It’s ludicrously Silver Age-y , and I had to check again to make sure it wasn’t really written by Bob Haney.  The domestic farce in this one was even worse than the previous one, and there’s little goofier than the entire set of super families hanging out and swimming in their own pool, all in full costume.  That kind of zaniness costs this issue a half Minuteman over the previous one.  I’ll give it 2 Minutemen.

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“The Legionnaires Who Never Were!”

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As usual, the Legion backup is great fun.  This one is an offbeat issue, though it certainly employs the standard Legion formula of the apparent enemy within.  I think the Legion must spend more of their time fighting each other and chasing “traitors” than doing anything else.  Imagine how much more they could have gotten done if they weren’t always worried about secret double agents in their midsts!

The issue begins with two of the lady Legionnaires, Saturn Girl and Princess Projectra, heading out on a mission to capture a “space renegade” (good band name), Pozr-Du.  You’ve got to love these Legion names.  On the way, Saturn Girl reveals a new costume, which I suspect points to a larger trend of linking fashion and female characters.  This is something I’ve noticed in some Supergirl comics I’ve read around this period (some of the only ones I’ve encountered).  I wonder if DC was attempting to bring in and engage more female readers with such an emphasis on costume design and the like.  I know the Supergirl book actually had costume design contests and the like.  It makes a certain amount of sense, and I think it’s a rather nice effort on DC’s part, if perhaps a bit heavy handed.

Well, when the girls find their quarry, they are ambushed by the renegade and blasted out of the sky, unconscious!  When they awaken, strangely enough there is no sign of Pozr-Du.  He didn’t bother to capture them or even finish them off, though they landed right in his lap.  Mystified and discouraged, there is nothing the pair can do but return to Legion HQ, which looks a bit different than I remember.  However, once there, things taken an even stranger turn, as their ship is snagged in an “energy-grappler” and Cosmic Boy, manning the defenses, claims never to have heard of them!

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The lovely Legionnaires are captured by their former teammates, and despite their protestations, Cosmic Boy and the others tell them that the Legion has never had members named Princess Projectra or Saturn Girl.  To prove their legitimacy, the heroines demand to be taken to the trophy room where they can produce evidence of their accomplishments, but when they arrive, they find their mementos are missing!  This provides us with a fun little glimpse of the Legion trophy room, complete with some really cool looking creatures and objects.

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Just then, two new members arrive to check out the intruders, Prince Projectur and Saturn Lad!  They demonstrate their powers, and the flabbergasted femmes begin to feel rather hopeless.  Interestingly, both of these guys are wearing almost the exact same costumes as their female counterparts, and it just looks plain ridiculous.  Just a slight redesign on them to give them something a bit more dignified and masculine would have done wonders.  At the very least, give them pants, for heaven’s sake!  This is like the unironic 70s predecessor of the Hawkeye initiative, and it does unintentionally illustrate how silly the average female comic character’s costume is.

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Anyway, fashion disasters aside, our two heroines find themselves prisoners, floating suspended in the middle of a chamber in a detention sphere.  The pair discuss their situation, and I really enjoyed the matter-of-fact way these two unflappable ladies calmly assess the possible explanations of their predicament.  They are experienced enough at this kind of thing to immediately recognize that there are a number of possible explanations.  They could be on an alternate Earth, the weapon they were struck with could have put them into a dream state, or many other even stranger possibilities.  I liked this.  It makes sense that experienced heroes would have a frame of reference for even something as crazy as finding out that none of your friends remember you.

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Unable to determine exactly what is going on from their cell, the ladies plan an escape, and they do so in clever and dynamic fashion.  The cell stretches with their movement, and since their captors failed to take their flight rings, thinking them fake, they fly in opposite directions, straining the bubble’s elasticity until it breaks.  Free once more, Princess Projectra has a plan.  She tells Saturn Girl to stay hidden while she looks for answers.

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In search of just that, she visits the quarters of a particular Legionnaire, her boyfriend, Karate Kid.  The Princess demands answers, and tries to remind Val of their relationship, including a really sweet little flashback to the first time they said “I love you.”  To attempt to spark his memory, the lovely illusionist kisses her erstwhile beau.  He still insists he doesn’t know her, but suddenly he collapses!  In another really clever move, the Princess applied a drug to her lips that would knock him out when she kissed him.  With the Kid unconscious, she applies a small device to his neck, hoping that it will answer her questions.

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Returning to Saturn Girl, Projectra is challenged by her male counterpart.  However, she has begun to suspect the truth, so she creates an illusory monster that threatens her, and the startled “Prince” leaps to her aid, letting her real name slip out in the process.  She unmasks him as Brianiac 5, and the jig is up!

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Slimer, no!

It seems that the new megacomputer Brainy built spit out a prediction that a Legionnaire was in danger of cracking under pressure and endangering her teammates, and it named Projectra.  The device was still experimental, so they weren’t sure that they could trust it.  They devised a training exercise to test their teammate’s reactions and combat fitness, throwing her into a completely bizarre situation.  Saturn Girl was the proctor and used her powers to cancel her partner’s out.  Chameleon Boy was Pozr and Sun Boy played the role of Saturn Lad.  Fortunately the clever Princess used one of Brainy’s inventions to discover that Karate Kid was lying and began to unravel the setup after that.

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Everyone congratulates her on her performance, and she is reunited with Val, who apologizes for putting her through that ordeal.  That’s nice and all, but I have a feeling he’s going to face an ordeal of his own in payback!  We also see the office of Legion Leader taken over by Mon-El, which is a fun little addendum to the story, adding a little peek into the organizational functioning of the team.  Things like that are neat in small doses, adding a certain amount of fleshing out to the concept.

The reason for the test is a bit stretched, as it really seems like there is probably a simpler way to figure out if Projectra is about to crumble than to subject her to an elaborate and extreme test that could have caused even a sane person to lose it.  Still, by the standards of the high melodrama that usually accompanies internal Legion stories, it rather fits.  The most important thing is that it is a fun tale, entertaining and rather surprising.  The different explanations the ladies propose are so reasonable and utterly common in comics that I never considered that it was all a hoax.  What’s more, the portrayal of the two protagonists was quite good, both of them coming off as competent, brave, and resourceful.

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It’s interesting that they went through their entire adventure without any violent action, yet the story was plenty entertaining.  I particularly enjoyed getting to know Princess Projectra in this yarn, as I hadn’t really encountered here much before.  As is often the case with these Legion backups, this short adventure packs a great deal in just a few pages, and does it with aplomb.  It doesn’t feel rushed, and there’s plenty of excitement while also providing us with a bit of character development.  That’s impressive.  Its also worth mentioning that I really enjoyed the art in this issue.  Win Mortimer turns out some great looking, classic DC house-style work, and he does some several really cool page and panel-breaking layouts.  So, slightly disturbing costuming aside, I’ll give this one an above average 3.5 Minutemen.

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That’s all for today, and I hope this post and these stories bring some lightness and some fun into your day.  On a day like today, that’s a good thing.  Join me (hopefully) soon for the next two tales in our journey Into the Bronze Age!

Into the Bronze Age: August 1970 (Part 6)

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Welcome to the last post on August 1970!  It’s not as bad as the Superman tale we met last time, but this isn’t quite the soaring success we encountered elsewhere this month.  I hope you enjoy this next step, Into the Bronze Age!

Roll Call (You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #391
  • Aquaman #52
  • Batman #224
  • Teen Titans #28
  • Detective Comics #402
  • The Flash #199
  • Justice League #82
  • Phantom Stranger #8
  • Showcase #92
  • Superman #229
  • World’s Finest #195

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.

World’s Finest #195

worlds_finest_comics_195“Dig Now, Die Later!”
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito
Editors: Mort Weisinger and E. Nelson Bridwell

This is definitely Zaney Haney, and not his most successful issue, though neither is it his least.  Compared to some of them, this one is even a little tame.  Haney lets this story get away from him a bit, so it isn’t quite as good as the previous iteration.  One highlight is the inclusion of the sidekick team.  I always enjoy seeing Jimmy Olsen and Robin join the World’s Finest.  I find them a fun addition, though they really don’t do much here.  Nonetheless, this issue has some good moments.  Unfortunately, Superman entirely overshadows everyone else in the, as he is wont to do.

When I started reading the Silver Age Superman and World’s Finest books, I was particularly surprised to discover how big a role Olsen often played in these adventures.  It seems that in order to provide Superman a sidekick akin to Batman’s, Jimmy was dragooned into service, despite not really being an equivalent figure.  It’s a weird little trend, and sometimes it really doesn’t fit.  Still, he is a resource kid and a good character, so it also led to some enjoyable yarns.  This one sadly doesn’t offer us anything special along those lines, though.

We pick up where we left off, with Superman unmasked by the brain-damaged Batman, who thinks he is the Mafia’s ‘Big Uncle’ Lukaz.  Trapped by the kryptonite wreath, the Man of Steel is rapidly weakening, and knowing that escape is impossible, he tries a desperate gambit.  He employs ‘Super-Ventriloquism’ to ape the sound of Krypto, hovering outside the fortieth floor window, causing a panic among the hoods.  Now, Super-Ventriloquism is a pretty goofy power, but I have to admit, this is a clever use for it.  It’s actually a good way for the hero to buy himself some time.

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It’s also funny to see a bunch of tough guys running away from a dog…

worldsfinest195-09.jpgWith his captors temporarily routed, the Metropolis Marvel puts everything he has left into an inhalation of super breath, which sucks the lead-lined suitcase closed, cutting off the deadly radiation.  When the mafiosos return, Superman seems to just be starting to recover, so they prepare to finish him off, but he fakes a memory loss like Batman’s, pretending he thinks he really is a hood.  Pseudo-Lukaz decides to make him into a weapon for the mob, and then we get one of the sour notes that trouble this story as the disguised Batman announces that he’ll continue to dress as Batman “to confuse the law!”  Ooookay.  Sure.  That’s a thing.  This has absolutely no follow-up and doesn’t affect anything.  It’s just an extra bit of weirdness that Haney decided to include.

Well, the Bat-Godfather, hereafter, the Batfather, takes his new ‘soldier’ to his special gallery, where he has wax figures of all of the mafia’s enemies.  He shows Superman the figures of Robin and Jimmy Olsen and tells him that they are the next targets.  They summon both boys to a junkyard where the Batfather plans to ambush them.  However, when the two youths are captured and on the point of being executed, Robin delivers an impassioned speech to his mentor, declaring that he loves Batman like a father.  The impact of the Teen Wonder’s words snap the Dark Knight out of his mafia persona.  It’s not a bad moment, though not given much room to breathe.

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Just then, Lukaz shows up, having escaped the Fortress of Solitude through yet ANOTHER head injury, this time that of a robot jailer, whose head-blow jarred its circuits into recognizing him as its master.  The Godfather and his two measly henchmen apparently frighten the entire team into inaction.  There is a good idea here, as the bad guys, using regular old guns, threaten Superman, not with death, but with the deaths of his allies.  The Man of Steel continues playing his part, knocking Batman out with a super-slap and burning Robin and Jimmy Olsen to ash with his heat vision!  He hands over their “hearts” to Lukaz in a special case and carries his erstwhile partner off to ‘dispose’ of him.

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I’m sure that’s fine for a man with a concussion…

On the way, the Dark Knight revives and punches Supes in a really odd looking panel, but the Man of Tomorrow calms him by explaining his plan.  He planted a tracker in the case, and they are headed to find Lukaz’s stash of evidence.  Along the way, we get another sour note, as Batman is stymied by a door marked “For accredited criminologists only.”  Can you imagine the Caped Crusader being stopped by a ‘no trespassing’ sign?  Well, they find the stash, but they are jumped by the Godfather and his two thugs.  Really?  Again?  If you’re going to fight freaking Superman and Batman, you should really bring more than two guys!

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Anyway, Robin and Jimmy arrive and take them out, with Superman revealing that, before he roasted them, he switched them out with their wax doubles from the head gangster’s own collection at super speed.  It’s a solid resolution, though, if the Man of Steel had time to do that, one thinks he could probably have just disarmed the thugs as well.  I suppose he needed the ruse to find the evidence cache, so we can ‘no prize’ that.

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This was a fun story, creative, with some clever moments from Superman and a good character moment with Robin and Batman.  Unfortunately, that was about the only good moment the Dark Knight had in this tale, with Superman carrying almost all of the action, even solving the mystery, making the World’s Greatest Detective pretty much entirely superfluous.  The end results is still enjoyable, but not terribly exceptional.  I’ll give it 3 Minutemen on the strength of the cleverer moments.

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This comic also had a Congo Bill backup.  It was a reprint, so I won’t be covering it, but it was a fun little story about a jungle con-artist, which basically employed the old ‘beguiler beguiled’ trope.

 

Final Thoughts:

Well readers, I ALMOST made it to September before our own September ended.  So close!  C’est la vie.  Nevertheless, we have successfully made it through August, and an interesting month it was!  We saw some of the very best and very worst stories we’ve yet covered.  August unfortunately saw the goofy Silver Agey-y Super Sons and, horror of horrors, the insipid foolishness of both tales from the Superman issue (which I was really probably too hard on), but it also gave us more great books than we’ve yet seen in one place.  The Legion backup, Aquaman, Detective ComicsTeen Titans, The Phantom Stranger, and Showcase all featured excellent stories, earning 4.5 Minutemen.  That’s not half bad!  We’re seeing innovation continuing to grow, with the Aquaman book and the creative Phantom Stranger tales, and we’re seeing a further growth of more mature (in the true sense, not in a ‘sex and violence’ one) themes and horror motifs in the Batman books.  All-in-all, I would call it a good month.  It seems we are settling in to something of a routine, with most books following a predictable pattern of quality and style.  Please join me next time to see what September holds!

 

The Head-Blow Headcount:

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We’ve had a busy month in the head-blow department, with our favorite Aquatic Aces both making an appearance.  Our Aqua-guys just can’t catch a break!  I’m mollified by the fact that, even though Aqualad has been added to the Wall, at least Robin is on there twice.  Take that Boy Wonder!