Into the Bronze Age: June 1971 (Part 2)

DC-Style-Guide-1

Hello comic fans and lovers of literature, and welcome to another edition of Into the Bronze Age!  We’re continuing our march through June of 1971, and it is already proving to be an intriguing month.  This pair of comics isn’t quite as fascinating as the last few, but we do have an enjoyable batch of books to explore.  So, further up and further in!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.

 


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #401
  • Adventure Comics #407
  • Batman #232
  • Detective Comics #412
  • The Flash #207
  • Justice League of America #90
  • Mr. Miracle #2
  • The Phantom Stranger #13
  • Superboy #174 (reprints)
  • Superboy #175
  • Superman #238
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #138
  • Teen Titans #33
  • World’s Finest #203

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Detective Comics #412


Detective_Comics_412

“Legacy of Hate”
Writer: Frank Robbins
Penciler: Bob Brown
Inker: Dick Giordano
Letterer: Ben Oda
Editor: Julius Schwartz
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

“The Head-Splitters!”
Writer: Frank Robbins
Penciler: Don Heck
Inker: Don Heck
Letterer: Ben Oda
Editor: Julius Schwartz

Under this pretty excellent cover, beautifully drawn by Neal Adams, we have a very conventional yarn.  The cover composition is exciting, with our hero facing mortal peril in a nicely rendered and atmospheric image that has the added benefit of actually occurring in the comic.  The headline tale is, despite its medieval trappings, a rather hackneyed plot, and though I can’t put my finger on it, I think I have read another Batman story that was extremely similar.

It’s another murder mystery in a castle, and on that front, this story hearkens back to the first Dr. Darrk story, only six issues ago.  Nonetheless, it’s an enjoyable enough read.  It begins with an old mystery device, as Bruce Wayne receives notice that a distant relative, Lord Elwood Wayne, is dying at the ancestral Wayne estate in England, though I’m fairly certain that we’ve never really had any mention of such family ties in Batman’s backstory.  Nonetheless, it’s the standard setup, an ailing relation, the gathering of the distant family from the four corners of the world, related, but unknown to one another, and a spooky locale for setting.  Bruce heads to England to answer the summons and meets Wilhemina Wayne, an orphan from South Africa, Rev. Emelyn Wayne “a missionary among the unenlightened Asian ‘heathen,'” and Jeremy Wayne, an Australian ranch hand.

Detective412-03

To add to the atmosphere, they are picked up in a hearse (the weather being too bad for horse and carriage) and driven to an imposing old castle on a stormy night, there greeted by an equally imposing butler, Asquith, a descendant of the servant of the original inhabitant of the ancient pile.  During the journey, the grim driver tells the gathered Waynes that the place is haunted by the murdered first lord of the estate, Lord Harold.  Once arrived, they meet the aged Lord Wayne and his friend and physician, but the meeting is necessarily brief.

Detective412-05

Detective412-06They are informed that the estate will be split between them, and any accidents will divide it among the survivors.  A perfect setup for intrigue, of course.  That night, Bruce is having a drink with ‘Mina,’ because of course he is, when suddenly she sees a figure in medieval armor on the battlements!  The millionaire comforts the girl and pretends he saw nothing, but he gets into costume, once again endangering his secret identity beyond all bounds (I wonder if the guy from Gotham has anything to do with the hero from the same city showing up here in the middle of nowhere..), and begins an investigation.

The Dark Knight hears a scream as he prowls about and arrives in Mina’s room, only to find himself confronting the armored figure of a strange intruder!  After a skirmish in which that very armor proves very handy against hand-attacks, his opponent escapes.  The Caped Crusade continues his search, wondering which of the gathered family and friends could be masquerading as a phantom.  He hears sounds of a struggle coming from the Aussie’s room and kicks the door in to discover the man, lightly wounded, but alive, having fended off another attack, and the hero sets off again in pursuit.

Detective412-07

Detective412-13After stopping to stage his bed to make it seem like Bruce Wayne is sleeping….while everyone else in the castle is running around like crazy, because that will be foolproof, the Caped Crusader hears another cry from Mina.  Her door was locked, but someone was trying to force it.  Pursuing the culprit into the marsh outside, the Dark Knight suddenly finds himself in desperate straits, stuck in the muck and being charged by a spurious spectral knight with a lance.  The strike seems to go home, and the warrior rides on, crying out that his vengeance can now begin.

Detective412-14

Yet, Batman lives!  He snatched up a tree branch and used it as a shield, though the impact almost knocked him out.  He rushes to the castle armory, thinking that he knows the supposed spirit’s identity.  There he confronts “Lord Harold,” and after a quick battle, the armored figure is unmasked as…Asquith?!  The spooky butler speaks in a strange voice, claiming to be Harold and saying that he was wreaking just vengeance.

Detective412-15

Detective412-19 - Copy

The batty-butler leads the Masked Manhunter to a hidden chamber where the real Harold’s brother had imprisoned him to usurp his title, and then, bizarrely, the sepulchral voice declares that Asquith has failed him, and the servant simply dies…yet the voice briefly continues, promising to continue its quest for revenge!  The story ends with Batman making notes about the case, pointing out that Lord Wayne had died that same night and pondering if this were a case of haunting or madness.

Detective412-19
Detective412-20

This is a solid enough murder mystery, but it has too many characters and too little space to be entirely successful.  Batman figures out the culprit on very thin evidence, noting that none of the relatives would have vengeance as a motive, despite the fact that, rationally, neither would Asquith.  The art is nicely atmospheric, and there are several fittingly Gothic moments, especially the showdown in the swamp.  Bob Brown does a good job throughout, rendering some nicely dramatic images and doing some good work on the various supporting characters, giving them personality, despite their lack of development.  Perhaps most notably, he really works to create a well-realized setting, putting a lot of detail into panel backgrounds and giving the old castle a real sense of presence.  In general, there’s more show than there is stay to this story, but it is still an enjoyable enough read.  It is very familiar, but the confirmation of an actual haunting makes it a bit more original than most of this type, though I wish they had left the ending just a tad more ambiguous.  I’ll give this one an average 3 Minutemen.

minute3


“The Head-Splitters”


Detective412-23

Our Batgirl backup certainly can’t be accused of being unoriginal this month!  It has one of the more unique murder weapons I’ve encountered in comics.  The tale begins with a woman awakening screaming, and the next morning the papers carry the headline that a wealthy socialite divorcee was mysteriously killed, her “head cracked like an egg!”  The same morning, breakfast at Commissioner Gordon’s house sees he and his daughter sharing a meal.  The head cop is baffled by the crime, but he reveals that the victim had a thing for wigs, which, according to Babs, is no clue at all because “What now-gal doesn’t dig wigs!”  Yikes, that slang!  Anyway, this gives Jim a clue, but for his daughter’s birthday, not the crime.  He offers to let her pick out a wig, for which he’ll foot the bill.

That day, Babs visits “Vazly,” the most fashionable wig-maker in town, where she and another divorced socialite happen to come in for fittings at the same time.  Ironically, they both pick out the same style, which causes the fiendish fashion-monger some concern.  It seems that he and his assistant are using their wigs to blackmail wealthy young women, fitting the headgear with an ingenious mechanism that can cause it to constrict with devastating power.  If they mix up the wigs and should accidentally target the police commissioner’s daughter, that could spell trouble, but they are careful to arrange them.

Detective412-26

Unfortunately, “Fate steps in,” and a cleaning woman tries on a few of the wigs and mixes up the two in question, and the dangerous one goes to our red-haired heroine.  Following the instructions that came with it, she sleeps in the wig, only to awaken in agony at the touch of a control by Vazly’s assistant.  Babs calls the wig-maker, and he tells her he will happily take it off, if only she’ll cough up $100,000.  In a pain-induced panic, the young librarian scrapes up the meager funds she can and heads to his shop, but when she arrives, the would-be blackmailers discover their mistake.

Detective412-30

They play the whole event off, easily removing the wig and telling the confused Miss Gordon that she must have dreamt the whole thing, yet they plan to kill her once she is safely away from their headquarters.  The fire-tressed female doesn’t play their game, however, having seen a cracked dummy head in the trash and put the pieces together.  She arrives in costume to confront them moments later and lets them know the jig is up.  She clocks Vazly, but his assistant plops a wig on her head and triggers the constriction.  Dun dun DUN!

Detective412-31

This is certainly a new angle, though it rather defies belief.  I have to think that a mechanism that would make a wig constrict with bone-crushing force might just be detectable…but then again, it works in a comic book-y kind of way, so I’m willing to give it a pass.  After all, this is the kind of ridiculous, over-the-top plot that makes comics great.  Vazly looks suitably sinister, and the mix-up with our heroine is a quick way to get her into the mix.  This story does suffer a bit from its lack of space, being only seven pages.  Still, it’s an entertaining read, one that once again matches Batgirl up against a fashion-felon, which might be a bit much, with two tales in a row.  I’ll give this one 3 Minutemen.

minute3


The Flash #207


The_Flash_Vol_1_207

“The Evil Sound of Music!”
Writer: Mike Friedrich
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

“Phantom of the Cafeteria”
Writer: Steve Skeates
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Dick Giordano

Well, what do you know?  Kanigher leaves The Flash, and we finally get an issue that is really  enjoyable.  It even features a supervillain, after a fashion, and ahead of schedule!  We actually get a foe worthy of the Flash earlier than I expected, just judging by the covers that awaited us, which makes this issue a pleasant surprise.  Speaking of covers, this one does the story within no favors.  It’s got a nicely creepy looking monster, but it suffers from the Flash’s weird pose and the fact that, even with the cover copy, the scene isn’t exactly clear.  It’s just not a very effective image, not doing the tale it represents justice.

And that tale is actually a fun read.  It begins with the World’s Fastest Man in a hurry, leaving monitor duty on the JLA Satellite to race home and pick his wife up for a rock concert.  Yet, as the Allens prepare, we visit with a sinister looking figure in a darkened room, pouring over ancient books.  This is Sargon the Sorcerer, former Golden Age mystic hero turned current villain…sort of.  It’s a bit complicated.  Apparently he appeared back in issue #186 in his not-so-triumphant return to the DCU, wherein he clashed with the Flash.  It seems that he is out to regain his lost mystic gem, the Ruby of Life, which is the source of most of his powers.  He also wants revenge on the Speedster, who thwarted his last efforts.

Flash207-03

Novick really draws the heck out of Sargon throughout the issue.

Back in the Allen household, we get a cute scene between Barry and Iris, as Mrs. Allen notes that her husband, usually a slowpoke out of costume, can’t stand still when music is playing.  He teases her because, for once, she has made them late with her ruminations.  Apparently the couple are bound for a rock concert, headlined by the oh-so-cleverly named “Washington Starship.”  I wonder who that might reference…!  The lead singers just happen to be named Paul and Grace.  Anyway, Barry and Iris arrive just in time, thanks to a dose of super speed, and it is a super psychedelic show, accompanied by Friedrich’s narration, which is almost touching and insightful but manages to be just a little too pompous and overblown to be successful.

Flash207-06

I wonder if the couples are supposed to be anyone famous….

During the concert, Sargon strikes, using his magic to turn the music into a psychic attack, which panics the crowd and paralyzes the band.  While the unflappable Iris stays behind to cover the unfolding story, the Scarlet Speedster springs into action, using his powers to pull the crazed crowd out of the venue and prevent anyone from being trampled.  Given the then recent history of tragedies at concerts, this scene has a little extra significance, with the hero preventing events from going bad in the ways they had before, a type of cathartic, escapist fiction that is very much part of the purpose of comics.

Flash207-10

Yet, after the concert-goers have escaped, Sargon steps in again, seizing control of the Speedster and sending him to retrieve the Ruby of Life from a special vault in the Flash Museum.  The sinister Sorcerer looks positively evil as he places the jewel upon his brow and revels in his returned power.  While he is distracted, his spell over Flash ends, and the hero and the guitarist, Paul, both find themselves watching helplessly as the malicious music-spawned monsters menace their lady loves.  Each of them strains mightily and overcomes the siren song, but only Flash has the speed to save his girl.

Flash207-14

But they are not the only ones observing this tragedy-in-the-making, and Sargon looks on in horror as his spell spins out of control.  We discover that Grace is actually his niece, and while Flash saves Iris, the magician intercedes to rescue the songstress.  The Sorcerer tries to apologize to the young woman, but she will hear none of it, and he departs in despair.  The tale ends by checking in with each of our characters a little later, with Iris taking care of a slightly ruffled Barry, Paul happily reporting that Grace and their unborn baby have a clean bill of health, and Sargon himself contemplating how he has come to such a state, willing to use his own niece in his quest for power.

Flash207-15

This is a surprisingly good story.  I have grown to rather dread these Flash comics, but this one is a fun and interesting read.  Mike Friedrich doesn’t get as sappy and melodramatic as he sometimes can, though the comic is rather overwritten in his customary style, with the narration during the concert being particularly purple.  Speaking of his writing, this entire issue is a love letter to the music of the era, with the obvious reference to Jefferson Starship setting the tone, but Friedrich gives us a lot more than that.  He also sprinkles song titles throughout the entire issue.  I counted nine different songs, but it’s possible I missed some.  They are:

  • “White Rabbit”
  • “Homeward Bound”
  • “The Sound of Silence”
  • “Come Together”
  • “Penny Lane”
  • “Let It Be”
  • “My Sweet Lord”
  • “Bridge Over Troubled Waters”
  • “Down This Lonesome Road”

We’ve got some Jefferson Airplane, of course, as well as plenty of Beatles and even some Simon and Garfunkel.  What an interesting collection!  This is a fun little set of Easter eggs, but they come at a cost, as Friedrich can’t quite slip all of them in naturally.  Thus, his desire to include these references sometimes results in some rather awkward and tortured sounding dialog.  Still, I found the whole thing charming, and it is an unusually direct glimpse of the impact of the culture on the comics of the day.

Flash207-17

In terms of the plot itself, it was nice to see the Flash actually face a foe that was something of a threat to him, and I found myself fairly fascinated by Sargon.  I’m really curious to know what his story is and what he’s after.  I quite liked that we got only hints about him and that he escaped, not unmarked by his experience, but uncaptured by our hero.  His brief moments of characterization are intriguing, and I look forward to seeing what comes of them.  I also enjoyed the little character moments between Barry and Iris, with her evincing a more classic taste in music and the like.  I wouldn’t really expect ‘ol square Barry to be into the rock scene in 71, but it leads us to a fun tale, so I can buy it.

Flash207-18

Irv Novick does a great job with Sargon and some of the more bizarre, otherworldly elements of the art here, especially the music monsters, but there are a few moments where his work doesn’t quite capture the drama of a scene, like in the climax of the story where the sequence of the two struggling paramours and Sargon’s intervention could probably have used a bit more space to breath.  Still, on the whole, he turns in a nice looking comic with some real personality and emotion to it.  I suppose I’ll give this enjoyable little rock ‘n romp 3.5 Minutemen.

minute3.5


“The Phantom of the Cafeteria”


Flash207-22

It looks like we’re going to have Kid Flash and Elongated Man trade off for the backup slot in The Flash, which is fine by me.  This month, we get an interesting little Kid Flash tale that has some familiar elements.  It begins with our fleet young friend, Wally West, pondering the dilemma of hiding his super speed in the cafeteria line at school, where he finds himself last, which is worth a chuckle.  Suddenly, food starts disappearing right off of kids’ plates, and there’s not a sign of the culprit!  Someone starts screaming about ghosts, which, in the DCU, is not all that far-fetched, but Wally keeps his head.  He calms down the students, even getting commended by the principal later on, but he continues to wonder about what happened.  When a pretty young lady asks him about their date that night at the “peace rally,” he’s so distracted that he temporarily forgets about it.

Flash207-26

Fortunately, he’s quick with an excuse as well as with his feet, and that night he’s at the rally when more food starts to go missing.  Wondering if the thief might be someone else with super speed, the Fastest Boy Alive gets into costume and races about in search, spotting another speedster and giving chase!  Despite being knocked aside by the blurred figure, Kid Flash isn’t to be discouraged and eventually finds a trail of food wrappers and other trash which lead him to a small, amphibious looking alien, passed out before a cliff-face.

Flash207-28

Thinking quickly, Wally determines that this creature is some type of unknown lifeform with an incredibly fast metabolism that moves at super speed.  It is emaciated and must have been starving, stealing food to survive.  Noticing a recent rock-slide, Kid Flash drills through into a cave system, and just then, the creature comes to and speeds into the cavern.  Theorizing that the being was a youth from a strange subterranean race that came out to explore, only to get trapped by the rock-slide, Wally seals the entrance and cleans up after the unusual but harmless visitor.

Flash207-29

This seven page tale lacks the great pacing and jam-packed content of one of Kanigher’s Robin backups, but it tells a complete if somewhat underdeveloped story.  The setup is a tad familiar as well.  I know The Flash had encountered various super-speedster aliens from time to time in such mysteries, but this version does have the charm of involving Kid Flash and his youthful setting, starting in the school and the like.  We’ve also got a nod towards realism, with the subterranean stranger’s appearance helping to explain its powers.  I’m wondering if Skeates is thinking about trying to do some world-building in these backups the way Kanigher has managed in his Robin tales.  It will be interesting to see if the red-headed Dana makes a return later on.

Flash207-30

It’s also notable that our young hero is seen going to a peace rally in this book, positioning him fairly clearly with the youth anti-war movement.  While his fellow Titan, the Teen Wonder, has been around the outskirts of such events, he’s maintained a certain neutrality.  While such politics were certainly not the focus of this story, it’s fascinating that the rally is featured here incidentally but deliberately.  Anyway, I suppose I’ll give this entertaining mini-mystery 3 Minutemen, as it doesn’t have quite enough substance to warrant more.

minute3


And with the super-speed sortie of Kid Flash behind us, we will write finis to this post.  We had a solid set of books here, nothing groundbreaking or of enduring fame, like last post’s introduction of R’as Al Ghul, but we do have some interesting evidence of growing cultural influence and some efforts at building continuity and creating ongoing plotlines in The Flash.  I hope that you enjoyed my commentaries and that you’ll join me again soon for another step on our journey Into the Bronze Age!  Until then, keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: May 1971 (Part 6)

DC-Style-Guide-2.jpg

Hello Internet travelers, and welcome to the final edition of Into the Bronze Age for May, 1971!  We’ve got three tales to finish out the month, and though quality varies, there’s plenty here to enjoy.  I hope that all of my readers are safe and sound, having escaped from the various disasters plaguing us at the moment.  Speaking of escapes, let’s do just that, find our way to a world full of heroes and find solace in the fantastic and the wondrous!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #400
  • Adventure Comics #406
  • Batman #231
  • Brave and Bold #95
  • Detective Comics #411
  • The Flash #206
  • Forever People #2
  • G.I. Combat #147
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #83
  • Justice League of America #89
  • New Gods #2
  • Superman #237
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #110
  • World’s Finest #202

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #110


Lois_Lane_110

“Indian Death Charge!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Werner Roth
Inker: Vince Colletta
Cover Artist: Dick Giordano

“The Face of Fate”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

Well, we’ve got quite a cover on this month’s Lois Lane issue.  I…hardly know where to begin.  It’s beautifully drawn by Dick Giordano, but it certainly is unusual.  Lois protecting a Native American baby is one thing, that getup is something else.  It really is a pretty striking image, with a crowd of angry white faces threatening in the background, even throwing rocks.  Given the attitudes about racial mixing that still exist today, you can imagine what it might have been like in 1971, seeing a white woman with an Indian baby, claiming it as her own.  The ridiculous elements of the image aside, it still probably created something of a stir.

The story within seems an obvious attempt by Kanigher to capitalize on his success with his previous excellent racial story.  Sadly, this one isn’t nearly as good. It begins in a similar way, with Lois pursuing a feature in the ghetto of Metropolis, where she is interviewing candidates for the Daily Planet’s “Mother of the Year” contest.  Yet, just as in the previous book, she is rebuffed by the natives of the place, though this time not because of her race.  Instead, a mother rather unkindly attacks the reporter because she is not a mother and so is unfit to pick one.

ll110_04

The career-minded Lois replies with biting sarcasm and flippant wit…oh wait, no, she is immediately consumed by an existential crisis because a stranger pointed out she doesn’t have children, and she weakly tells Clark that she would have a family, if only Superman would marry her.  This little scene bothered me a bit, though I suppose I should have expected it.  I want Lois to be the confident, self-assured woman we’ve been getting glimpses of lately, and this seemed a bit weak for her.  Nonetheless, she begs off the story with Perry and is sent to cover a Pueblo Indians rain dance on a reservation in the west, with Clark along to cover the same story for TV.

ll110_05

ll110_07While there, we get a cross-section of the tourists, all saying various terrible things, which sets the tone for the encounter.  The Pueblo tribesmen declare that they won’t hold the dance, as it is a religious ceremony and not a circus.  The crowd gets ugly, and Superman has to intervene to prevent a riot.  He whips up a dust storm to blind and separate the crowds, and while he is working, Lois tries to help a young Indian mother get her child to safety, but the girl declares “My baby must learn to expect hurt from the white man!”  Wow!  Yeah, no-one in this country has gotten a worse deal than the Native Americans, but I’d still say that doesn’t exactly make her mother of the year material, what with the willful endangerment of her infant and all!

ll110_07 - Copy

As the crowds break up, Lois follows the Pueblo people, offering to help.  They refuse her aid, but let her accompany them, telling their story.  It is a sadly familiar tale of exploitation and corruption, the eradication of the buffalo herds and the theft of land, but it has a particular wrinkle.  The Indian leader, Johnny Lone Eagle, shows the reporter a dam being constructed that threatens to flood their village.  What’s worse, the dam isn’t fated to provide power to a city or anything so useful or productive.  No, it’s only going to create a lake for a rich man’s fishing preserve.

The Pueblo tribesmen plan to attack and dynamite the dam, risking their lives, women and children too, to protect their homes.  Lois observes their war dance the night before the attack, but convinces their leader to let her report the story….with smoke signals.  Oookay.  That’s a bit much, and it rather undercuts the seriousness of the story.  A little later on, the young Indian mother, Singing Rain, is discovered laying on the ground, apparently badly injured, though she looks more like she just can’t be bothered to get up.

ll110_11

ll110_11 - Copy

Deathly ill or just mildly annoyed?

On the morning of the showdown, the Indians and the construction workers face off, about to come to blows, when Superman scoops up the entire dam, angry crowds in tow, and drops it into a mountain valley, quickly shaping the place into a replacement pond with super strength, and thus solving the problem.

ll110_14

Yet, Singing Rain has apparently worsened, and she dies, but not before giving her baby son to Lois to raise as her own.  Lois is touched and promises to care for ‘Little Moon,’ though no-one, white or red, is happy about it.  We see her happily taking care of the little tyke, but things take a turn when a sleazy publisher who would give even J. Jonah Jameson pause tries to get her to sell the rights of her story.  When she refuses, the fellow twists the facts, claiming she approached him, and soon the foster mother finds herself the center of competing protests.

ll110_15

Shortly thereafter, Lois is driving when she is forced off of a bridge!  In other words, it’s a Tuesday.  She and the baby plunge into a river, and though the reporter finds herself trapped, she desperately pushes the child to the surface, only to be rescued at the last moment by a Native American soldier.  She awakens in the hospital to find Joseph Bright Wing, Little Moon’s father, who was missing in Vietnam.  He was in the truck which sent her careening off the bridge, on his way home, having escaped from a V.C. prisoner of war camp.

ll110_16

He thanks the girl reporter for caring for his son and notes that she almost gave her life for the boy.  She bids Little Moon a tearful farewell, and the story ends with an unexpected ceremony, wherein Lois Lane is surprisingly selected as the Daily Planet’s (foster) mother of the year.  Yet, one moron in the crowd can’t keep his mouth shut, and he calls out that she’s color-blind, caring for an Indian baby.  We get a real clunker in  her reply, as Lois answers back that: “It’s you who are blind!  My heart and Little Moon’s are the same color!”

ll110_20

It’s…an unsatisfying conclusion, really.  Superman snaps his super fingers and solves the racial conflict, giving both sides what they want, despite the fact that the sides were not equal in merit.  The trouble is that the rich jerk who was willing to flood an entire village so he could take a private fishing holiday didn’t deserve to get what he wanted.  I’d have rather seen some of the social justice-oriented Superman we glimpsed in O’Neil’s run, smashing the dam and changing hearts, not just placating the bullies pushing around the little guys.  The ending to Lois’s plot is okay, but just packed full of convenience.  It’s positively deus ex machina.  She happens to run off the road right in front of the child’s father, who just happened to be coming home from Vietnam at that exact moment.  Kanigher is clearly trying to recreate the magic of the previous story’s powerful ending with their hospital room meeting, but this one just doesn’t come together naturally or effectively.

ll110_21

This issue has a great message about the humanity and dignity of America’s abused native population and about the insignificance of racial difference, but they are rather lost in the shuffle of competing elements.  This comic ups the drama and the stakes compared to the previous tale of this type, but it moves too far too quickly.  There was something remarkably realistic, despite the fantastic trappings, in the previous yarn.  This one tries to cram a bit too much into the plot, leaving too little room for pathos.  Instead, it descends to bathos.  Yet, Kanigher’s heart is certainly in the right place, and it is interesting to see him focus on native peoples and the continuing themes of racial divisions.  Perhaps the most striking thing about this issue is the blatant racism on display in many of the background characters, an ugliness that is treated pretty straight-forwardly.  It’s surprising and arresting.

As for Roth’s art, for the most part it is beautiful and detailed, as it usually is.  I’m still really enjoying his tenure on this book, but there are a few moments where his work fails in its storytelling duties, as when the supposedly injured Singing Rain looks more like she’s mildly perturbed rather than desperately hurt.  Still, Roth fills the book with interesting and detailed faces and delivers some solid emotional work throughout.  All things considered, I’ll give this ambitious but rather flawed issue 2.5 Minutemen.  It just doesn’t manage to capture either the quiet dignity or the gentle impact of Kanigher’s previous effort.

minute2.5


“The Face of Fate”


ll110_22

Topping off this issue is another Kanigher-penned tale, the continuation of his Rose and Thorn feature.  This one picks up where the last left off, with the titular Thorn haunted by the spirit of a wronged woman that wants vengeance in order to find its peace.  The plea for revenge has found the right type of audience, and the next night, the Thorn sets out to find the girl’s killer, Albert Talbot, and bring him to justice!  On her nightly prowl, the female fury finds her boyfriend, Detective Danny Stone, getting his head handed to him by a pack of 100 thugs.  It’s just possible that Stone is really bad at his job given how often she has to rescue him!

ll110_26

The Baleful Beauty comes on like Gang Busters and takes out the gunsels, only to discover that Stone’s sister may be following in her ghostly guide’s footsteps, falling for the charms and hollow promises of her target!  This is…a bit convenient and an unnecessary complication.  However, because the supernatural is involved, you could hand-wave it as the workings of fate.  A bit of dialog drawing attention to this fact would have gone a long way, however.

ll110_27

Following the slightly dented detective’s lead, the Nymph of Night manages to locate Talbot’s estate/hideout, and she scales the fence, taking out a pack of dogs and then a passel of guards with various trick thorns in a rather nice looking set of sequences.  Finally, the Vixen of Vengeance earns her name by facing down the felonious fiend who murdered poor Selena.

ll110_29

Talbot has taken Detective Stone’s sister hostage, but as he threatens her with a candelabra, he unwittingly sets the drapes alight in his panic, setting the whole house ablaze in no-time.  The Thorn saves the foolish girl, but she is unwilling to let even such a despicable lout as Talbot meet his fate in a fire, so she rushes in to save him as well.  She succeeds, pulling him from the flames, but he is horribly burned, meeting a similar fate as his victim.  To add ironic salt to his wounds, the Baleful Beauty leaves him the same mask worn by Selena years ago.  When she returns home that morning, the Thorn sees Selena’s spirit fade away, finally able to find peace.

ll110_30

This is a brief and absolutely packed story!  It’s actually pretty good, which adds to my growing impression that Kanigher was actually best in small doses.  He really crams plot into these few pages, and though he over does it a bit, the end result is a pretty solid tale of vengeance. The final showdown is rapid-fire but quite dramatic, and the irony of the ending is pretty effective.  The villain meets a fairly grisly fate, and this type of approach to justice continues to set this feature apart from the rest of the DCU.  It’s rather refreshing to find a tale like this as the exception, rather than the rule in a superhero universe!  There are some slightly clunky elements, as with the random element of Stone’s sister and history repeating itself, but she does add to the tension in the final scene and add a bit more urgency to the plot.  I’m actually a bit surprised that Kanigher wrapped this arc up in just two issues.  I rather expected it to have a bit more buildup, and it may have benefited from such.  Nonetheless, the final effect was pretty solid, and Rose and Thorn continues to be a strong feature.  I’ll give this outing 3.5 Minutemen.

minute3.5


World’s Finest #202


World's_Finest_Comics_202

“Vengeance of the Tomb-Thing!”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella
Editors: Julius Schwartz and E. Nelson Bridwell
Cover Artists: Neal Adams and Dick Giordano

Rounding out the month of May, we’ve got another adventure of the world’s finest team, and it’s a fairly solid one.  We’ve got a wonderfully dynamic cover with the two super-friends locked in deadly combat.  The strange enthroned figure behind them looks suitably alien, though the featureless orb isn’t as menacing as it might be.  I’m reminded a bit of the titular Robot Monster.  The cover text boldly proclaims that this image is not a cheat, which is certainly intriguing.  It’s a beautifully illustrated composition, which makes the opening splash page of the book, which largely recreates it, a tad disappointing.  Dick Dillin is a fine artist, but comparing his work to Neal Adams’ is a losing proposition in my book.

World's_Finest_202_01

The actual tale begins with a stormy night over a distant Middle Eastern desert, where a familiar flying red and blue form is struck by lightning, and, strangely, knocked out of the sky by the bolt!  A gang of desert bandits hear the impact and are soon astounded when Superman walks out of the rain and into their camp.  Even more amazing, the Man of Steel seems to have lost his memory, and the bandit leader, ‘Bedouin Brakh,’ decides to use the confused hero to forward his own nefarious goals.

World's_Finest_202_02

The next day finds Lois Lane (of course) covering a nearby archeological dig of the tomb of ‘King Malis,’ (I bet he was a real nice guy) when they are suddenly attacked by bandits.  The archeologists take a page from Dr. Jones and prove that any well stocked expedition is a well armed one, opening fire on the raiders.  Yet, one of them proves bullet-proof, and he smashes through the guards.  Lois, displaying rather insane levels of courage, bare-handedly attacks the man she just saw shrug off rifle bullets, revealing him as Superman!  Unfortunately, it’s an amnesiac Man of Tomorrow who doesn’t recognize her, and the girl reporter finds herself taken prisoner.  The bandits use the confused champion, dressed up as a ghost, to scare away other visitors and take over the dig in order to loot it.

World's_Finest_202_05

Back in the states, a certain millionaire playboy hears about the mystery surrounding these events on the news and decides that Batman should investigate, which is a tad random.  O’Neil gives us a few touches of realism as Bruce complains about the heat and closes his eyes to prepare to enter the tomb without being blinded by the change in light.  Such little details are welcome. and add to the slightly higher tone of the tale

World's_Finest_202_09

As the Dark Knight springs into the supposedly haunted tomb, he surprises the Bedouin guards and acquits himself well until Superman suddenly appears.  The Masked Manhunter thinks his friend is playing a part, so he goes along with what he expects to be a staged fight, but only too late does he realize that the conflict is in deadly earnest.  The Man of Steel chokes his friend out, and the bandits take the Gotham Guardian prisoner!

World's_Finest_202_12

Meanwhile, we see Superman…or rather, SuperMEN, smashing into icy cliffs in the arctic.  What is this?!  It seems that the real Metropolis Marvel has been at this Fortress of Solitude working on his Superman robots, trying to get them functioning properly.  O’Neil hits his one of his favorite notes as we’re told that the trouble is too much pollution in the air, which is making the bots go haywire.  That bugged me a bit, because it felt a tad forced.  An increase in radiation affecting the machines would make a certain amount of sense, but this just seems a bit silly, an excuse for mentioning the author’s pet subject.  Nonetheless, the Kryptonian decides that he can’t trust his doppelgangers any longer, despite his best efforts, and he discovers that one of his robots is missing.  Heading back home, he hears about Lois’s disappearance and streaks off to the rescue.

World's_Finest_202_13

Arriving at the tomb, he confronts the bandits, who have enslaved their prisoners, forcing them to excavate the site.  Of course the sinister Superman is, in fact, the renegade robot.  Interestingly, when the real Man of Steel orders his artificial android back home, it refuses for an intriguing reason.  While its master has never treated it as anything but a machine, Brakh has treated it as a friend, and so it chooses to stand with him.  That’s…actually almost touching if you think about it.  Superman is entirely unmoved by this and doesn’t bother to ask if androids dream of electric sheep, just smashing the apparently sentient super-bot without a qualm!

World's_Finest_202_16

Batman gets in on the action, dropping the bandit, but the tomb is opened in the struggle, and a strange red light escapes from it, weakening the Metropolis Marvel.  Suddenly he is no match for the renegade robot, who lays a vicious beating on him in revenge for his mistreatment.  The Dark Knight tries to intercede, but the machine easily cleans his clock.  Just then, a glowing figure emerges from the darkness of the sepulcher in a nicely dramatic appearance.  It’s a mummy with a glowing red globe for a head, and it starts smashing everyone nearby.  This could look rather goofy, but I find it a surprisingly effective design.

World's_Finest_202_18

Taking a gamble, the Caped Crusader comes to his senses just in time to rescue Superman, tossing his cape over the creature’s glowing gourd.  His hunch was right, the creature’s head is some kind of device that gives off radiation similar to that of a red sun, weakening the Kryptonian.  When the antagonistic android tries to intercede, Batman gets some revenge, smashing the machine, and when the recovered mummy attacks again, Superman returns the favor, knocking the shinning sphere off of its shoulders with a boulder and then smashing what is revealed to be its robotic body.

World's_Finest_202_19

The exhausted champions theorize that the legendary King Malis was actually some type of advanced android created by an alien race and imprisoned on Earth centuries ago.  Sure.  That makes sense in a comic book-y kind of way.  The heroes suspect they’ll never learn the details of this weird case, but the Man of Steel notes that, whoever those beings were, “they had problems very like ours!”

World's_Finest_202_21

Ohh!  Batman with the bad-A one liner!  Nice!

That’s a droll ending to a fun adventure.  O’Neil gives us a solid romp here, full of dramatic peril and heroic efforts.  While Batman’s ignominious defeat by the Superman robot the first time is a bit disappointing, for the most part we see the wit and energy here that characterizes O’Neil’s better stories, as when Superman casually notes that he’d have to be foolish to make his own robots stronger than he is.  Strangely, despite the fact that O’Neil is doing such a bang-up job on the Batman books at this time, he doesn’t quite seem to capture the Dark Knight’s voice in this yarn.  Other than that, there are only two real flaws here, one being that the Masked Manhunter is captured, but not turned into the Maskless Manhunter, which makes no sense.  Why in the world wouldn’t the villains want to unmask Batman?  It’s a common trope, but not a good one.

World's_Finest_202_22

Perhaps more significantly, nobody at all seems even mildly concerned that this robot has suddenly developed sentience and free will, perhaps making it, in C.S. Lewis’s terminology, hnau.  Instead, his creator seems just mildly miffed that his walking toaster is talking back to him.  Frankenstein this ain’t, is what I’m saying, but as has often been the case with the stories we’ve encountered so far, this tale raises the specter of themes that it doesn’t have the interest to pursue, and that’s a shame.  Still, despite that oversight, O’Neil delivers a fun read here.  It might have benefited from being a two-parter and developing Malis and this strange alien race some more, but we’re left with the impression of depth.  Dillin’s art is really quite good throughout as well, and we’re not seeing some of that stiffness that often accompanies his JLA work.  There are several really nice sequences in this story.  I suppose I’ll give this adventure 3.5 Minutemen, as it is fun, but not quite living up to its potential.  On an unrelated note, it looks like the next issue features Aquaman.  Yay!

minute3.5

 


The Head-Blow Headcount:

Aquamanhead.jpgBatmanhead.jpgshowcase-88-fnvf-jasons-quest0robin2 - Copy.jpgPhantom_Stranger_05.jpgrobin2 - Copy.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpgAquamanhead.jpg3072564469_1_3_hCmU7jwq.jpg

arrowheadglheadAquamanhead.jpgAquamanhead.jpgAquamanhead.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpg2f52ff2370b3a87769869427faeac69darrowheadAquamanhead.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpgMister_Miracle_Scott_Free_00014aa6e3fed1467a75dcac3f9654a2c723

We’ve got no additions to the Wall of Shame this month, but we’ve still collected quite a list of characters.  Who knows how many head-blows the future holds?


Final Thoughts:


Well, it took me a while, but I’ve gotten through another month in our journey!  Quite a month it was, featuring the return of legendary (and legendarily bad) Bat-villain, the Ten-Eyed Man…for some reason!  The ridiculousness of that story alone made this month of comics worth the read for me!  Still, there was a lot more here than just the Emperor of the Occulus.  We’ve also got Batgirl’s fashion adventures, an (almost) guest appearance by Spiro Agnew and Richard Nixon, and a cameo by Alfred Hitchcock.  You don’t see that every day in comics!

We encountered my least favorite JLA issue to date, thought it was certainly fascinating as a cultural artifact, providing a brief glimpse of the pop-culture production of the early 70s, as well as some biographical elements of a famed sci-fi writer.  Perhaps most notably, it pointed to Harlan Ellison’s involvement with comics in this era and the overlap and cross-pollination between mediums that is always the case.  The Flash continues to be a real, real drag, ironically enough, though the inclusion of an Elongated Man backup should help to lighten the blow.  O’Neil’s Superman, on the other hand, is staying surprisingly strong, delivering fun, even somewhat thoughtful, comics.  Now that he’s got full-length books to work with, it is paying off well.  It’s a shame that his Green Lantern/Green Arrow work can’t evince the same sense of adventure and wit.  I suppose he is trying too hard in that book.

On an even more exciting note, Jack Kirby’s Fourth World saga continues to develop, and with second issues, we’re starting to get into the meat of his stories.  Having read through his Fantastic Four run since the last time I read these books, I have a new perspective on how he is developing as an artist and storyteller, and it is fascinating to see.  Of course, it continues to be really interesting to see the context of his efforts in the Fourth World, and what is going on in the rest of the DCU really illustrates just how innovative and different his work was.  This month’s brief glimpse of cosmic, psychedelic elements in the Forever People is just a hint of such difference, but it is a telling one.

In terms of cultural significance, we saw a continued interest in the turmoil on campuses in both the Robin backup and our weird Supergirl tale this month, though it isn’t given as much focus as it has been.  Lois had another racially charged adventure this month, and despite its lack of success as a story, it points to the increasing social awareness in the DCU and, in particular, a focus on Native American issues.

Notably, we also saw the creation of a character by the ever unpredictable Bob Haney that really defied expectations for this era in the form of the feminine yet entirely independent and self-possessed Ruby Ryder.  Strangely, this was actually one of the elements of the month’s books that I found most interesting.  When even heroic women like Black Canary are still occasionally depicted as shrinking violets, it’s interesting to see Haney’s femme fatale hold her own in a man’s world, a businesswoman in an era when that type of thing was exceptionally rare.

Well, that will do it for the month of May, 1971!  I hope that y’all enjoyed the ride as much as I enjoyed the reads.  Stay safe out there in the real world!  For those of you in the paths of hurricanes, fires, floods, or earthquakes, I wish you all the best, and you’re in our prayers in the Grey household.  Remember folks, do what you can to help out, as there is a lot of need.  Until next time, keep the heroic ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: May 1971 (Part 5)

DC-Style-Guide-2.jpg

Welcome to another edition of Into the Bronze Age!  With the world apparently either burning or drowning, this seems like a perfect time to read stories about super beings and heroes.  In desperate times, some light-hearted adventure is often just what the doctor ordered!  We certainly have some interesting titles in this batch.  We’ve got one of the weirder Justice League issues I’ve ever read, but we also have some more epic Kirby goodness to cleanse the palate, as well as more of O’Neil’s interesting Superman run.

Hi-ho Bronze Age!  Away!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #400
  • Adventure Comics #406
  • Batman #231
  • Brave and Bold #95
  • Detective Comics #411
  • The Flash #206
  • Forever People #2
  • G.I. Combat #147
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #83
  • Justice League of America #89
  • New Gods #2
  • Superman #237
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #110
  • World’s Finest #202

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Justice League of America #89


JLA_v.1_89

“The Most Dangerous Dreams of All!”
Writer: Mike Friedrich
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

Okay guys.  Brace yourselves.  This is a weird one.  In fact, that doesn’t do it justice.  It’s just plain bizarre and…well…I’m afraid it is also just plain bad.  I love the JLA, and I can appreciate an experimental story, but what we have here is a failed experiment.  We start with an unusual cover, nicely drawn by Neal Adams, but rather uninspiring.  It claims the reader will have a chance to inhabit the role of Batman or Superman…what about Aquaman?  Anyway, inside, we begin with a JLA meeting, with Aquaman acting as chairman, which is mildly fun.  Sadly, this is the last semi-useful thing he will do in this issue.  The gathered Leaguers break up and head back out among the populace, dressed in some really swinging 70s fashions.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-02

Bruce Wayne thinks he’s cool with his ascot, but check out Aquaman’s duds!  That takes confidence!

Oddly, we suddenly cut to Mike Friedrich, a character in his own comic, who tells us that sometimes stories exert their own pressure and insist on being told.  O-okay?  We cut to LA, where Black Canary is apparently just walking around the street in costume for no particular reason, when she runs into the cleverly named ‘Harlequin Ellis.’  Those of you with a taste for science fiction and some background in its luminaries may well recognize both name and figure.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-03

That’s right, this guy is an homage to Harlan Ellison, famed fiery sci-fi writer for TV, movies, and print.  The comic character also happens to be a TV writer with a fiery personality, and he sets his sights on the Blonde Bombshell.  Another strange note here is that the narration is second person, inviting the reader to identify with Dinah, though that doesn’t last.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-04

They meet and there is an instant connection, as in, love at first sight, which is hokey enough on its own, but an established trope.  Add to that ‘ol ‘Touchy-Feely’ Friedrich’s narration, and the scene is rather cringe-inducing in saccharine tone.  The pair grab a cup of coffee and stare longingly into each other’s eyes until Green Arrow shows up and reacts about as well as you’d expect when he finds Ellis making time with his girl.  The writer laughs the situation off, but he offers a chance for Dinah to meet him if she wants to “dump this crude bozo.”  Here the narration switches to the standard omniscient third person.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-05

He’s really lucky the Ace Archer doesn’t turn him into a pin cushion…

Afterwards, we follow ‘Harlequin,’ back to his…home?  Office?  It’s unclear, but his secretary and some other guy are there, presumably people actually connected to the real Ellison, but they add pretty much nothing to the story.  The writer is deaf to their pleas, sitting at his typewriter, dreaming up stories concerning the JLA.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-07

Suddenly, Green Arrow and Black Canary find themselves transported to Mexico, where they find a curio store with a strange artifact.  When they touch it, they fade to black, and we cut to Superman, or, maybe Ellis imagining Superman?  Either way, at this point the narrative perspective shifts again, and suddenly we’re supposed to identify with Ellis, who is apparently creating real events with his imagination, fueled by his broken heart…somehow.  It is…confusing to say the least, and this artifact is never explained.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-08

Superman, guided by Ellis, spies Canary, who is no longer in Mexico, I guess, and swoops down to carry her away, speaking romantically, which confuses the heroine.  Then the Man of Steel spots the JLA, trapped in a cave by a cyclops, and he says he’s somehow responsible, presumably because Ellis has imagined all of this.  What’s worse, Aquaman is dying!  Super-Ellis charges the Cyclops, and, in a sequence with really heavy narration that drowns out the art, he overcomes the monster, only to arrive too late.  Aquaman is dead!

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-12

Except, not really, of course.  The Metropolis Marvel suddenly turns into Harlequin, and the League vanishes, leaving the Emerald Archer and the Dynamic Dame back at the restaurant where they started.  Black Canary once again displays her ‘woman’s intuition’ powers and gets a sense of what’s happening, with a weird visualization of the ‘pit’ of despair that threatens to swallow Ellis, who is heartbroken over the rejection by the girl who he just met.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-13

Heading to club where he offered to meet Black Canary, his mind drifts again, and suddenly he is Batman, observing Green Arrow facing a ‘Minotaur,’ which is clearly a centaur, while the lovely Mrs. Lance looks on.  The unfortunate archer’s arrows are ineffective, and when Black Canary moves to intervene, Bat-Ellis jumps in to save her, using his cape to blind and defeat the beast.  Once again, he is revealed to be the writer, and the scene fades, but the Emerald Archer is still hurt.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-18JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-19

Summoning help, Dinah leaves Ollie to go meet Ellis, and we get another weird visualization of despair as she explains that her heart belongs to someone else…and apparently doesn’t bother to follow up on how this guy has incredibly potent reality warping powers.  She just lets him walk away, and the comic ends with another appearance by Friedrich, who builds on his earlier statement, talking about how he identifies with all of his characters.  It is a weird and not terribly clear or satisfying ending.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-21

Yikes!  This dialog!

So, this is one weird issue.  It’s got a strange, dream-like structure that is confusing and disjointed.  It’s trying so desperately for pathos and emotional weight, and it is just failing spectacularly in that regard.  This is clearly a personal project for Friedrich, a fan letter to Harlan Ellison, which is fine, but it just doesn’t work for the rest of us.  It is badly conceived, badly executed, and badly written.

JusticeLeagueOfAmerica089-22

Friedrich tries several interesting tactics here, but none of them really work.  His structure, meant to evoke a certain stream-of-consciousness storytelling, leaves the readers unable to follow the plot (I’m still trying to figure out the magic artifact thing).  The narration is another failed idea.  Second person narration is traditionally used to place the reader in the story after a fashion, but he breaks whatever success that move could have had by switching characters multiple times.  While I’m sure it would have been neat to see the wink at Harlan Ellison during this era, whose name was showing up all over the place in the 60s and 70s, including on some story credits at Marvel around this time, the story is just a mess.  I’ll give it a sad 1.5 Minutemen.

minute1.5


New Gods #2


New_Gods_v.1_2

“O’Deadly Darkseid”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Jack Kirby

Fortunately, we have another issue of Jack Kirby’s epic New Gods saga to make it up to us!  It has another photo-collage cover, though you can hardly tell, as the image is dominated by Orion’s tortured form.  That part of the composition is pretty great, but I think the three floating heads would have been better as just one figure, whether of Darkseid or his minions.  Either way, it’s something of a mixed bag.  When you open the book, however, the splash page more than makes up for it.  It’s a great image of the opposed worlds of Apokolips and New Genesis with a nicely written bit of narration that catches new readers up on the mythic origins of our tale.  I particularly like the description of Apokolips, with “its stark and functional temples–in which creatures of fury worship a creed of destruction!”  Not half bad!

newgods02-01

The story really begins with Highfather, who is communing once more with the Source, which tells him that it is time for more inhabitants of New Genesis to follow Orion to war.  The young Lightray begs to make the journey, but he is refused, while on Earth, the man in question makes a disturbing discovery, as he finds Darkseid waiting for him at the home of one of his new human allies.  The great villain sits impassively in a chair, and when Orion hesitates in his instinctive attack, the master of Apokolips taunts him with secret knowledge.  Then, from behind the door springs one of his minions, who attacks the Dog of War with a “shock-prod.”  Orion pushes through the pain and grapples his foe, eventually knocking him through the wall and sending him plummeting into the air, only for both Darkseid and his dance partner to disappear.

newgods02-05

The scene seems slightly…beneath Darkseid.  It isn’t quite grand enough, fitting more with a gangster film than a cosmic epic, with the single heavy hiding behind the door.  I think Kirby is still finding the right tone for the character, as I suspected might be the case.  After the fight, Orion’s five rescued companions introduce themselves, giving him an instant supporting cast.

newgods02-07

newgods02-09

Now, as I remember, these five contribute almost nothing to this book, but we’ll see if my memory has been unkind to them.  They certainly don’t’ evince an excess of personality in this issue.  I assume the King wanted to provide a human perspective on the grand cosmic tale he’s telling, but I think a single human sidekick could have filled that function more easily than five of them.

newgods02-10

At any rate, the next scene follows the escaping Darkseid, who goes back to his hidden base and quickly displays his displeasure with his flunky’s failure.  There he finds Desaad, who is working on a device to trigger abject panic in its targets in the hopes of triggering the brainwaves for which they are searching.  After a successful test on the hapless workers nearby, Darkseid orders the device into action.

newgods02-11

That’s some glorious Kirby-tech!

Meanwhile, Orion uses his Mother Box to fill his newfound friends in on the conflict into which they’ve stumbled, and we get previews of some of the Apokoliptian threats that face the Earth, including Mantis and the Deep Six.  The fact that Kirby never had Aquaman encounter those aquatic aliens is a massively missed opportunity.  This section serves as a bit of a catchup, bringing readers up to speed on the current state of affairs across the 4th World books, including a glance at the Wild Area from Jimmy Olsen.

Show and Tell time is interrupted by the unleashing of the fear ray, which sends the city into a panic.  Orion dons his Astro Harness and rides to the rescue, and once again, I can’t help but feel like we’re probably missing some detail in some of these panels, thanks to Coletta.  Either way, our ferocious hero arrives at the source of the ray, a giant billboard, but it has defenses of its own.  He is blown out of the sky, but not before he blows it away in turn.  Orion manages to stop his careening fall with a blast of his ‘Astro-Force,’ saving himself and returning to his friends.  Darkseid, for his part, is disappointed at the lack of results, and in his dialog with Desaad we get yet more hints about Orion’s origins.

newgods02-20

This is a pretty good issue, though it is largely setup and catchup.  Still, it manages to provide us with a solid adventure tale and several moments of plot and character development.  In terms of the art, it is absolutely beautiful for the most part, and if Kirby’s work got a bit too cramped and rushed in this month’s Forever People, that is absolutely not the case in this book, where he gives us not one, not two, not three, but FIVE lovely full-page splashes, not counting a gorgeous double-page image of New Genesis.

newgods02-22

All of this eye candy robs us of some plot and action, leaving this issue feeling a bit thin, but it admirably serves its purpose of setting the stage for the adventures to follow.  There are still a few spots where Kirby’s pencils are a bit off, notably with Orion looking a bit funky in a few panels, but his dialog is, thankfully, missing that occasional clunkiness we’ve noticed in these books.  Taken on its own, this story is flawed but fun.  I’ll give this issue 3.5 Minutemen, with the art making up for the paucity of plot.

minute3.5


Superman #237


Superman_v.1_237

“Enemy of Earth”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: Curt Swan
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

Our final book for this post is another issue of Denny O’Neil’s Superman run.  So far, these comics have proven to be pretty solid, if a bit strange at times.  Let’s see how this one stacks up!  First off, we’ve got a really striking and unusual cover.  Adams has certainly rendered the bizarre mutations of the crowd well…but I’m not sure that the effect isn’t more comical than dramatic.  Either way, the cover certainly piques a reader’s interest.  The tale inside is a pretty solid adventure story, and there’s a certain amount of personality and wit that raise it above the average.  It begins in standard Superman fashion, with the Man of Steel racing to save a crashing plane.  Yet, the aircraft in question is an experimental device that has been up into space, and when the Kryptonian sets it down and rescues the pilot, he finds him hideously mutated!

superman 237 0003

superman 237 0005After taking the unfortunate flyer to a hospital, where the doctors are completely stumped, the Man of Tomorrow reasons that the illness could be the result of an alien disease.  To ensure that he isn’t contaminated, Superman just takes a quick jaunt to the radiation belt to take a bath in deadly rays, as only Superman can.  This is a fun little scene, though there is a rare failure in Swan’s art as he can’t quite pull off an interesting illustration of the phenomena.  I would rather have liked to see what Kirby would have done with that!

superman 237 0006

Returned to Earth, our hero changes into Clark, after which he is ambushed by Morgan Edge, who tries to give him a tongue lashing for not getting the story on the experimental ship, only to have Mr. Mild Mannered very politely but firmly let him know that the reporter was on the way to deliver that very scoop on the air.  It’s a brief but nice scene, giving Clark a chance to show some personality, which is too rare in these older stories.

superman 237 0007

Yet, during the broadcast, the Kryptonian begins to feel weak, only to discover that the Sand creature that has been following him is nearby.  Turning back into the Metropolis Marvel, Superman confronts his dusty double, but his efforts to communicate are met with silence while an attempted touch is met with a burst of energy so powerful it knocks him through the roof!  Even worse, when the Action Ace regains his feet, he finds the Daily Planet staff have been affected by the same strange alien disease as the pilot!  It seems clear that the radiation bath was insufficient and Superman has infected them.  This leads us to a nice dilemma.

superman 237 0010

Superman realizes that he’s responsible for this and that he’s a danger to everyone he’s around, but just then he hears a mayday from Lois, who is on assignment in South America.  Her plane is going down in an area being overrun by a horde of army ants that are consuming everything in their path.  O’Neil displays a bit of personality and cleverness in Superman’s exasperated reaction as he observes “that girl just can’t lead a normal life!”  It’s another small but enjoyable moment.

superman 237 0011

superman 237 0014

After alerting the hospital, the Man of Tomorrow takes off for South America, still trailed by the Sand-man (no, not that one!).  Meanwhile, Lois’s plane has crashed, apparently because her moronic pilot forgot to put fuel in it!  This is a weird little detail.  What’s the point of it?  There’s no real payoff, and it just seems too stupid to be believable.  Nonetheless, that’s the explanation we’re given, and things get worse when bandits arrive!

Superman arrives to help, but when he lands amidst the marching army ants, two of them that touch him immediately grow to massive size and attack him.  After disposing of them, the hero discovers that one of them grew even further after he hit it, and he wonders why.  Disposing of the ants by throwing them into space, the Man of Steel faces a terrible choice.

superman 237 0020

He’s seen first hand how dangerous his mere presence can be, infected as he is with the strange disease.  He wonders if he should head out into space, never to return, thus leaving Lois to her fate, or intervening and risking who knows what effects on Lois and perhaps even the microbes in the air itself.  Now, this is, even in context, a bit extreme given the existence of sources of help like the Green Lantern Corps., but we’ll give it a pass for the dramatic weight it achieves.

superman 237 0021

Meanwhile, an ill-conceived bit of heroism leads to the pilot being knocked out and the bandits abandoning them both.  Lois tries to lug this albatross around her neck to safety, but he’s too heavy and the ants are too swift.  This leads to another really good moment, as the reporter contemplates just leaving the idiot, especially because this is his fault in the first place, but she decides she has to do the right thing, no matter the cost.  That’s a great character moment for her, and it reveals the type of woman Lois should be.

superman 237 0024 - Copy

Elsewhere, the doctors have cracked the case and cured the disease.  They send out broadcasts to let Superman know, but in some good dramatic irony, he is sitting in space, unable to hear.  Just then, the sand creature arrives, now somewhat colored after their contact.  Realizing that the energy explosion after their encounter was the reason one of his hands didn’t infect one of the ants, the Man of Steel takes a desperate chance, embracing the creature and triggering a tremendous blast that sends him hurtling earthward like a meteorite.

superman 237 0027

superman 237 0029

superman 237 0029 - CopyHe lands with a tremendous impact near Lois, and though he is weakened, he is stills strong enough to carry her and her burden to safety, handily capturing the bandits in the process.  Just when it seems like everything is going to be alright, the sandy stranger arrives, finally able to talk after their latest contact, and the dusty doppelganger tells Superman that he is the Kryptonian’s exact equal, and he fears that they cannot both survive!  Dun dun DUN!!  That’s a pretty solid cliffhanger.

superman 237 0031

This is a pretty good story, even if it isn’t outright fantastic.  We get a pretty great problem for our hero to solve, and it’s one for which all of his great strength is useless, and there are several small but entertaining moments that demonstrate a surprising amount of personality and even provide some character development.  One of the strengths of O’Neil’s run is his tendency to provide Superman with interesting moral dilemmas, where his abilities are secondary to the problem at hand.  It’s a good way to provide drama to a character as powerful as he is.  I’ll give this one 4 Minutemen.

minute4

 


And that wraps us up for this post.  It’s certainly an interesting trio of books, and the JLA issue especially is something of a time-capsule, both for fashion and for culture.  Thank you for joining me in my journey through these classic comics!  I hope y’all will join me again soon for the last issues of the month.  In the meantime, stay dry and safe out there in the real world!  Here in the Grey household, our prayers are with those affected by the hurricanes, fires, and floods.  Until next time, keep the heroic spirit alive, and as part of that, try to find some way to help those that need it!

 

Into the Bronze Age: March 1971 (Part 6)

DC-Style-Guide-2.jpg

Hello Internet travelers, you’ve just encountered the final post in this portion of my coverage of DC Bronze Age comics!  Here at the end of this month of mags, we’ve got all Superman, all the time!  They’re a pretty fun set of comics, and they certainly have some interesting qualities, both positive and negative.  They make a pretty fitting set of titles to consider as a cap to this set of features.  Enjoy!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #398
  • Adventure Comics #404
  • Batman #230
  • Brave and Bold #94
  • Detective Comics #409
  • The Flash #204
  • Forever People #1
  • G.I. Combat #146
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #82
  • Justice League of America #88
  • New Gods #1
  • Superboy #172
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #136
  • Superman #235
  • World’s Finest #201

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Superman #235


Superman_v.1_235“Sinister Scream of the Devil’s Harp!”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: Curt Swan
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

Denny O’Neil’s tenure on Superman continues, and, quite frankly, I continue to be impressed.  I’m very pleasantly surprised that, under this goofy looking cover with what looks like a hairy brown version of Satan slugging it out with the Man of Steel, there is a good, solid Superman story.  The cover is actually dynamic and interesting enough, though like roughly half of the Metropolis Marvel’s comics from this era, it depicts him being bested by someone inexplicably more “super” than he is.  Somewhat hackneyed concept aside, the real problem is the goofy-looking opponent he faces.  The character, who turns out to be attempting to evoke the goat-footed Greek god Pan rather than the cloven hoofed Devil of medieval imagination and popular culture (one inspired the other, after all), just doesn’t quite fit with the tight-wearing superhero.  Nonetheless, the comic really is a good read.

We join Mr. Mild Mannered himself, Clark Kent, on a rare date with Lois Lane, as the two of them prepare to attend a special concert of a new piano virtuoso, the improbably named Ferlin Nyxly.  There’s some fun bantering between the two, and we actually see Lois displaying some of the pluck and personality we’ve been seeing in her own book, but which seems to have been missing in Superman’s own books since the 50s.

superman 235 0003

Fitting, as I don’t see Lois as the classical music type…

Poor Clark, for his part, is still playing second fiddle to his alter ego, but as the pair take their seats, he spots helicopter-borne assassins preparing to bomb the crowd in order to kill a visiting dignitary!  That’s pretty cold blooded!  The Man of Steel does his quick-change routine, stops the bomb with his body, and then yanks the copter down, all the while being hosed down with machinegun fire.  His casual handling of the situation is entertaining, as with last issue, and the complete helplessness of these would-be killers against him makes for a nice contrast with what comes later in our tale.  As he leaves, Supes gives Lois a wave, a simple gesture that will have unintended consequences.

superman 235 0005

Yeah, just keep trying.  Maybe you’ll get lucky!

Meanwhile, his antics have attracted the attention of the crowd, and no-one is taking any notice of Nyxly’s playing, causing the musician to berate himself and think back on the strange start to his music career.  It seems that not long ago he was the curator at the Music Museum, where he was cataloging new acquisitions.  He noticed a strange, devilish harp and he played it, an eerie tune resulting, as he lamented that he had never amounted to anything.  Nyxly had always wished to be a musician, and after playing the harp and considering his wish, he suddenly found himself able to play beautifully!

superman 235 0008

That night at the concert, the excited susurrus of the crowd is suddenly silenced by the surprising outcry of an old man in the audience, who chastises the concertgoers for their rudeness.  Clark and Lois notice that the man is a former pianist whose skill mysteriously disappeared a few months ago.  What a coincidence!

The next day, Clark narrowly manages to avoid having to read a blistering editorial against himself!  Mr. Corporate Evil himself, Morgan Edge, orders Kent to deliver the message after misinterpreting a picture of the hero waving to Lois and accusing him of grandstanding.  Fortunately, the reporter is saved by the bell, or more accurately, a breaking story, when reports come in of an unidentified flying object over the Atlantic.

The Man of Steel takes the opportunity to get into costume and investigate the matter.  Flying over the watery wastes, he encounters the sand creature created a few issues back, and try as he might to catch up to it, he can’t close in on the strange being.  Meanwhile, the bitter musician broods over his perceived slights, and he strums upon his harp and wishes that he could fly as the Kryptonian does.  Suddenly, Superman plummets out of the sky, no longer able to soar!  The rest of his powers remain, but back in Metropolis, Ferlin Nyxly finds himself floating.  Racing along the waves like the Flash, the Metropolis Marvel finds himself being paced by the sand creature, but he’s unable to communicate with it.

superman 235 0014

superman 235 0017Now we hit the one real weakness of the issue.  For some reason, Nyxly feels the need to dress up in a Pan costume from his museum and take to the streets to steal the wealth he’s always coveted.  O-okay?  The story of this weak fellow’s corruption through power is actually pretty good, but the random choice of Pan as his costumed (sort of) identity is a really odd one, especially considering the fact that the Greek deity is associated with Pan pipes (which he’s credited with inventing) rather than harps!  Logic aside, the flying soon-to-be felon zooms around the city before snatching some money bags from an armored car, only to be shot by one of the guards in a rather funny panel.  As he falls to the Earth, Nyxly wishes for invulnerability, and when he hits, he smashes a hole in the pavement but emerges unscathed, flying away and happily ignoring the guards’ bullets.

superman 235 0021

Back at the paper as Clark, our hero has coffee spilled on him and is stunned when it actually scalds him.  Before he can investigate this strange occurrence, he’s summoned to observe a broadcast of a challenge by none other than Nyxly, now calling himself “Pan.”  The nascent villain calls Superman a coward and a braggart and dares the hero to meet him for a duel, which thrills Morgan Edge, of course.  Despite his mysteriously flagging powers, Superman refuses to back down from a challenge, and speeds to face ‘Pan.’

superman 235 0029

Counting on his remaining abilities, the hero attacks, but Nyxly plays his harp and steals first his speed and then his strength, leaving the former Man of Steel to bruise his knuckles on the villain’s chin.  Suddenly, as Pan toys with his helpless victim, the sand creature races into the stadium and, at Superman’s urging, smashes the harp, breaking the spell.  Having helped his double and despite the Man of Tomorrow’s attempts to communicate, the sand creature leaves as mysteriously as it arrived, leaving Clark to wonder just how they are connected and what this motivates this strange being.

superman 235 0030

So, Pan is a weird choice for a supervillain’s nom de guerre, (Freedom Force did it better!) but despite that incongruous element, this is actually a really solid story.  You’ve got some nice action, some good characterization for everyone involved, including the villain, who is given a surprising amount of depth for a one-shot character, and an intriguing resolution.  The ongoing mystery of the Sand-Superman is really a fascinating one, and I’m quite enjoying O’Neil’s treatment of that plot thread.  O’Neil is making the most of the ongoing storytelling in this book, and it is a promising move in general, highlighting the growing complexity of the writing in this era.

superman 235 0031

‘Pan,’ despite his silly aesthetic, provides an interesting departure from the usual two dimensional villains we’ve been encountering, as he’s driven to evil much more by his desire for self-realization than by greed or a thirst for power.  I also quite enjoyed the focus on Superman’s ‘never say die’ attitude, despite how hopeless his situation was, but man, would he have been embarrassed if he survived all the brilliant madmen, alien warlords, and rampaging monsters, only to be taken out by this loser!  This was a fun, interesting comic, and I’ll give it 4 Minutemen, taking away some points for Pan’s goofy appearance.

minute4


Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #136


Jimmy_Olsen_136“The Saga of the DNAliens”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

Time for some more Fourth World madness!  While all of Kirby’s New Gods books are creative in the extreme, I think there’s little doubt that his Jimmy Olsen series houses his craziest, most ‘out there’ ideas.  All this title’s zany concepts like the Wild Area, the Project, and everything that goes with them, are really unique and unusual, whether they soar or sink.  This issue contains some of both types in the exploration of the mysterious government ‘Project,’ and the attempts of the rival Monster Factory to destroy it.  We get a nice looking Neal Adams cover image, though that yellow background is rather ugly.  Unfortunately, the Hulk…err…I mean the green Jimmy clone, is a bit goofy looking.

This issue we join events already in progress as the Jolly Green Jimmy engages in a massive battle with the newly emerged Guardian clone, while Superman has already been knocked out by his Kryptonite covered fists.  Kirby captures this titanic struggle in a glorious double-page spread.  For a time, Guardian holds his own, relying on his superior agility to counter the monster’s strength, but eventually it lands a devastating blow, stunning the hero.  Jimmy tries to revive Superman, and the creature is momentarily distracted when it notices that the youth shares its face.

 

jimmy olsen 136-06 the saga of the dnaliensSuperman cleverly frees the young reporter from…well…himself, by collapsing the floor beneath them with subtle pressure from his foot, snatching his pal from the crashing creature.  The conflict seems about to renew when suddenly a cloud of smoke explodes from the Incredible Olsen’s own head, and he collapses.  The Legion and their allies are all befuddled by this sudden turn until the Man of Steel reveals a tiny antagonist hidden in the monster’s hair, a miniature paratrooper armed with gas grenades.  Moments later, an entire company of teeny troopers float down around them and assemble a Lilliputian device that covers the creature in liquid nitrogen, freezing him.  To top off the weirdness of this twist, these minuscule military men are all clones of Scrapper!

jimmy olsen 136-08 the saga of the dnaliens

jimmy olsen 136-11 the saga of the dnaliensSo, the Project created tiny paratroopers from Scrapper’s DNA?  Were they trying to put the Atom out of a job?  It’s so insane that I hardly know what to say about it, yet, in a certain sense, the idea works.  It’s another of these utterly crazy concepts that Kirby tosses out left and right in this series.  Such crumb-sized commandos would actually be pretty useful, and their role in defeating the monster is certainly an interesting twist in the story.  Still, the choice of Scrapper, as with all of the Newsboy-derived clones, is baffling, though he himself seems thrilled by it, missing out on the existential angst of being cloned without his consent, just like Jimmy did last issue.

jimmy olsen 136-10 the saga of the dnaliens

With their unintentional attack having failed, the two Monster Factory scientists find themselves on Darkseid’s bad side, and you really don’t want to be there.  In classic Kirby fashion, the two Apokoliptian’s study a massive, room-sized model of their target, just so the King can provide some visuals of the place, and they ponder their next move.  They decide to use a new and unknown creation and travel down into a special chamber to witness the creatures hatching.

jimmy olsen 136-13 the saga of the dnaliens

jimmy olsen 136-21 the saga of the dnaliensMeanwhile, back in the Project, the Legion is thrilled to meet the Guardian and ply him with questions, only to have their fathers reveal that this is not the original hero, but a clone created to replace him.  Sadly, this doesn’t really get explored, but as Superman takes Jimmy on his promised tour of the facility, the young man at least voices some concerns over the dangers of playing God.  I’m glad Kirby at least nodded at the moral and practical issues involved with these concepts, but the story still remains entirely too matter of fact about such things.

During the tour, the pair see the wonders of the Project, including where the young clones are raised (lots of issues there that don’t get explored), and the ‘step-ups,’ advanced clones like the Hairies with incredible intelligence.  Kirby also includes a fairly neat photo-collage, which has a bunch of ‘science-y’ stuff on it.  I think this works better for me than most of such images because what you’re looking at is not supposed to be the same type of 3D object as that portrayed by the regular art.

jimmy olsen 136-19 the saga of the dnaliens

Yet, the highlight of their trip is when the Man of Tomorrow introduces his young protege to a rather different kind of tomorrow man, a home-grown alien, the product of radical tweaking of human DNA.  The strange looking fellow named ‘Dubbilex’ bears Jimmy’s slack-jawed amazement with dignity and undeserved good humor.  There’s a certain undercurrent of sadness in this being who had no say in his creation and who now serves as a conversation piece for every big-wig visitor to the place.  The tale ends with the hatching of the mysterious monsters of Simian and Mokkari, four armed creatures that bode ill for our heroes.

jimmy olsen 136-21 the saga of the dnaliensa

‘Hey, do I come to your job and stare at your horrible fashion sense?’

This is a fun story, despite (or perhaps because) of the Kirby’s trademark imaginative insanity. The fight with the Jade-jawed Jimmy clone was dynamic, and its ending was certainly entertaining.  The strange facility itself proves the real star of the issue, and Jimmy’s tour is a fascinating look at the place.  The King is moving quickly, but he’s working to establish an interesting and exciting setting in the Project and its evil opposite.  There’s no question that the concepts he’s introducing are both fascinating and groundbreaking for comics.  It’s just a shame that he’s not making more out of what he’s creating.

jimmy olsen 136-22 the saga of the dnaliens

It’s likely that some of the nonchalant attitude surrounding the genetic tinkering and flat-out Frankensteining of the Project results from Kirby’s own hopeful scientific optimism about the power and destiny of the human race.  He seems never to entirely have lost the cheerful outlook and faith in science of 50s science fiction, despite the real world’s failure to deliver on the promise of the shiny utopian visions of earlier fiction.  He sees these things as intrinsically positive, and we’re still a year away from Watergate, so America hasn’t entirely lost faith in the government yet either.  What to modern readers seems incredibly sinister may have been, to a certain extent, quite straight forward to contemporary audiences.  So, despite its shortcomings, this is still an entertaining and intriguing issue, and I’ll give it 3.5 Minutemen.

minute3.5

P.S.: Notably, the letter column for this issue includes a missive from a sharp eyed fan who spotted the touch-ups of Kirby’s art in the previous issues, as well as DC’s rather weak explanation that Kirby was just not used to the characters, so his versions didn’t look right.  The column is otherwise filled with almost universal praise for the King’s new efforts on the book, including letters from several readers who had followed Joltin’ Jack from Marvel, which is pretty neat.


World’s Finest #201


World's_Finest_Comics_201A Prize of Peril!”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella
Editors: Julius Schwartz and E. Nelson Bridwell
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

Our final book this month is something of a mixed bag.  There’s an enjoyable superhero story here, but there are also some rather odd moments as O’Neil makes some strange choices.  Nevertheless, we’re presented with a nicely dynamic cover by Neal Adams (how did he find time to actually draw any books with all the covers he was doing ?).  All of the figures look good, and the framing, with them literally battling over Earth, is rather nice.  Yet, Dr. fate looks a bit odd, just sort of standing in space.  The cover promises some more star-spanning adventure, like some of our previous issues in this series, and we definitely get a fairly non-terrestrial tale, which plays into the strengths of both the protagonists.

It begins with a meteor shower heading towards Earth and being noticed by both Superman and Green Lantern independently.  Each hero sets out to divert the menace, but they end up unwittingly cancelling out each other’s efforts, exacerbating the situation, and the Man of Steel has to race to save a airliner from a rogue meteoroid.  This incident is actually a neat idea, as it is entirely possible that the two heroes most concerned with space might foul one another’s lines as they responded to the same emergency.

wfc20104wfc20105

Afterwards, the two heroes investigate why their efforts failed and, finding one another, an argument breaks out.  This is one of the weaknesses of the issue, as their fight is a bit silly.  They immediately blame each other, taking rather mean-spirited shots ant one another.  Superman even tells Lantern that his attitude for the last several months has been lousy.  It all feels just a bit too petty, and while we’ve seen this kind of thing from Hal lately, it seems out of character for Clark.

wfc20106

Suddenly, the glowing visage of a Guardian appears and berates the two heroes, telling them that this exchange is beneath them, which is actually quite true.  He proposes a contest to help them sort out their differences, saying that the winner will have dominion over atmospheric perils and demands that they meet back in space in 24 hours.

The next day, the contentious champions rendezvous to find that Dr. Fate has seemingly been summoned to create their contest.  They wonder at his being there rather than home on Earth-2, but he waves away their question and shows them a purple dragon, an enchanted object from his universe, that will be the goal of their competition.  Next he conjures two vast, parallel race courses and tells each hero that they must face their gravest fears in order to reach the finish line.

wfc20110

The race starts, with Green Lantern pondering what awaits him, as he is, after all, fearless.  That’s why his ring chose him.  Along his way, the Emerald Gladiator is suddenly seized by sticky yellow strands.  His ring is helpless against the golden bonds, and he soon finds himself faced with an immense yellow spider.  He is also consumed with fear, despite the fact that he had never really been afraid of bugs before.

wfc20115

He realizes that, though his ring can’t free him, his own strength can, and he manages to snap his bonds and escape from the trap.  Now, this whole scene works reasonably well.  Obviously, Hal is not really afraid of spiders, but he is afraid of becoming too dependent on his ring and it failing him in his need.  The sequence is effective and exciting, and at least a little insightful on O’Neil’s part.

wfc20116

wfc20117Superman’s encounter with his greatest fear is not quite so successful.  Suddenly the Man of Steel finds himself confronted by the towering figure of his birth father, Jor-El, and the Kryptonian scientist tells his Earth-raised son that he is terribly disappointed in him because he’s wasted his gifts and not become a man of science.  Okay, that’s rather odd.  Superman’s greatest fear should really have involved either his abusing his powers or his not being able to save someone despite his powers.  Those are really the things that worry the Man of Tomorrow.  But he hangs his head and is ashamed of all the world-saving he’s done, because a father he never really knew yells at him.  Yet, what really makes the whole situation go from strange to creepy is when Jor-El starts spanking his super-son, and the Metropolis Marvel begs him to continue, saying he deserves it.  Yikes!  I feel like we’ve stumbled into something that maybe O’Neil should have kept private!

wfc20120

I’ve…got nothing.

Well, the Action Ace finally wakes up to what’s going on and, by exerting his willpower, dispels the illusion and continues on his way.  The two heroes arrive at the same time, and, in order to keep the speedier Superman from reaching his goal first, Green Lantern tries a risky gambit.  He notices that the creature has a strange aura about it and reasons that it may be more than an inanimate object, so he uses his ring to cancel out its effect, bringing the beast to life and causing the Man of Steel to fall back.  Yet, when he himself tries to cage the creature, the Emerald Crusader finds his ring helpless, as the monster rips through his constructs.

wfc20123

The dragon repulses both heroes and tears out into space, racing straight towards the Justice League Satellite.  Finding their individual efforts inadequate, the two Leaguers join forces, with Green Lantern using his ring to shield Superman from the creature’s magic, while the Kryptonian champion belts the beast, tearing it asunder.  They celebrate their combined victory, but Superman realizes that they’ve been duped, so they rush off to confront “Dr. Fate.”

wfc20127

Sneaking up on him in a power-ringed comet, which is actually a fairly clever tactic, the heroes leap upon their ersatz ally, revealing him to be Felix Faust, the Justice League’s old foe.  Faust’s thoughts explain that he needed the Lantern’s ring to activate his spell and the whole thing was an elaborate ruse to destroy the League.  With their enemy captured, Superman and Green Lantern realize that their rivalry bred nothing but ill-fortune, and we get something of a sappy O’Neil moment as Hal wishes the people of Earth would realize the same thing.

wfc20130

This is, taken as a whole, a pretty decent superhero adventure.  You’ve got some nice action, an interesting setup, and an honest-to-goodness supervillain behind it all.  You’ve also got some attempts at characterization with the two protagonists, though the end result isn’t the best fit.  There are some definite weaknesses in this issue, though.  For one, Faust’s plan is just a touch too complicated to really make sense.  He needs the Lantern’s power ring to activate his spell, which is reasonable enough as such things go, but this is the best way the wizard can come up with to accomplish that goal?  Why not just present the Lantern with the big, scary looking dragon and let nature take its course?  Why bring Superman into this in the first place?  O’Neil just needed a little more thought and another line of exposition to solve that problem.  Something along the lines of ‘I needed Superman’s strength to breach the dimensional pocket that had trapped this creature’ or the like would do the trick.

wfc20131

Rather more significant is the *ahem* odd episode delving into the Man of Steel’s daddy issues.  The embarrassing panel aside, the scene still just doesn’t really fit with the character, though O’Neil tries to justify it by saying that this fixation is a result of Kal-El being an orphan.  There’s just one problem with that.  He’s not really an orphan.  He was adopted as a baby and raised by the Kents.  He’s got a father who is proud of him, and while there’s still some room for angst and ennui in that setup, it just doesn’t track for this to be the defining issue in his life.  Despite these weaknesses, this is a fun adventure and an enjoyable read.  I particularly liked the resolution, with the heroes combining their powers to defeat the threat, as well as the reveal that Felix Faust had been behind it all.  It’s just nice to see an actual villain show up in one of these books.  Dillin’s artwork is serviceable, though he really does some good work on the larger, more cosmic moments of action.  I’ll give this one 3 Minutemen, though I’m a little tempted to dock it a bit more for the spanking.

minute3


Final Thoughts:


What a month!  All-in-all, it was a fairly positive set of titles and there were several quite enjoyable reads scattered throughout.  Obviously, the most notable feature of this set of books was the appearance of two new Jack Kirby created comics, bringing our total of Kirby books up to three.  The debut of these two books marks the true beginning of his Fourth World saga, and these are also the first books in his career that he’s had near total control over.  What a huge shift that was, the realization of a dream the King had long been chasing.  It was also a pretty unheard of event in the comic industry at large, as it was rare for a single creator to be given that much control over their work.  For the first time in his career, the King was free to really let his imagination run wild, and the end results are certainly fascinating.  While The Forever People is a limited success, the first issue of New Gods is extremely striking.  There’s no doubt that Jarrin’ Jack is blazing new trails.  It really is a unique experience to read these books in context, and I’m fascinated to see how these titles will develop together against the backdrop of the wider DC Universe.

This month also highlights just how uneven Denny O’Neil was as a writer.  He created a very solid, completely realized Superman adventure on the one hand and yet turned in the muddled mess of this month’s Green Lantern book on the other.  That doesn’t even take into account the…odd choices made in our World’s Finest tale.  I’m becoming convinced that one of the defining traits of his work during this period is a tendency towards great ideas and poor execution.  There’s no doubt that he was extremely imaginative and that he could occasionally do a great job with characterization.  Yet, at this stage, his work is more often marked by aspiration than accomplishment.  I have a feeling that will change in time.  After all, he is still innovating and testing what the genre can do at the moment.

In terms of major themes this month, we see that youth culture continues to be a significant concern.  Both this month’s Batman and Brave and the Bold titles feature stories concerned with both teen involvement and its dangers.  Notably, each has a story that details disenfranchised groups turning to violence to achieve their ends, with very different receptions from the protagonists in the two books.  These were not this month’s only attempts at relevance, however, with even Superboy getting into the act for the second month in a row.  Of course, the message in that book was lost in the shuffle, but it is still a sign of the times and features an unexpected theme, one we haven’t really seen before, in its treatment of poaching.

Well, I believe that wraps up March 1971.  I hope that y’all enjoyed the journey, and what’s more, I hope you’ll join me again soon as I start looking into April!  Until then, keep the heroic ideal alive!


The Head-Blow Headcount:

Aquamanhead.jpgBatmanhead.jpgshowcase-88-fnvf-jasons-quest0robin2 - Copy.jpgPhantom_Stranger_05.jpgrobin2 - Copy.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpgAquamanhead.jpg3072564469_1_3_hCmU7jwq.jpg

arrowheadglheadAquamanhead.jpgAquamanhead.jpgAquamanhead.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpg2f52ff2370b3a87769869427faeac69darrowhead

Believe it or not, I actually almost closed this month out without acknowledging Green Arrow’s second appearance on the wall.  This month’s turn on his shared title saw the Emerald Archer get his goateed face shoved through a plate-glass window.  The booming blow landed on the back of his head and knocked him right out, earning him another coveted spot on the Headcount!  He’s our only new addition this month, making it a pretty quiet period, but I’m sure there’s more head-blows on the horizon!

Into the Bronze Age: March 1971 (Part 5)

DC-Style-Guide-2.jpg

Hello folks, and welcome to another edition of Into the Bronze Age!  I’m back on my routine, at least for a little while, so I’ll hopefully finish this month up soon.  I’m very excited about today’s post, as we’ve got New Gods #1, the start of what is undoubtedly the most significant of Jack Kirby’s Fourth World books.  There’s also a delightful little surprise in this month’s Superboy, which added to my enjoyment of these comics.  In general, we’ve got a good set of books to discuss, so let’s get to it!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #398
  • Adventure Comics #404
  • Batman #230
  • Brave and Bold #94
  • Detective Comics #409
  • The Flash #204
  • Forever People #1
  • G.I. Combat #146
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #82
  • Justice League of America #88
  • New Gods #1
  • Superboy #172
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #136
  • Superman #235
  • World’s Finest #201

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Justice League of America #88


JLA_v.1_88“The Last Survivors of Earth!”
Writer: Mike Friedrich
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

This is an interesting cover for an unusual issue.  Notably, this comic has the distinction of being the only pre-crisis JLA book to feature Mera on the cover, and she does look good there with the rest of the League.  It’s a shame she didn’t get into action with them more often.  The cover itself is indicative of the era, showing the JLA having failed in some fashion, a common trope, but interestingly, there is some truth to this particular tableau.  The issue inside is a fun one, if a bit odd, as the heroes really don’t have much impact on the outcome.

The tale begins with a strange golden spaceship, which has a pretty cool design, speeding towards Earth as a robotic voice addresses its passengers.  The voice reminds its charges that they are the people of Mu, which, like Atlantis, is a legendary lost continent, and a very promising addition to the mythos of the DCU.  The mechanical voice continues, recounting how the citizens of Mu had used their superior technology to flee what they thought was a dying world, but their return, thousands of years later, has revealed a flourishing orb.

JusticeLeague88-02

The people of Mu, being kept alive by their machines, are now degenerated and decadent from their enforced isolation and inaction, and they can only respond with hatred to the modern inhabitants of Earth who they assume must be inferior to themselves.  Dillin achieves a pretty creepy, horrific effect with his portrayal of the Muians, vast rows of stiff, motionless figures, all screaming mindlessly for blood.  It’s like a much darker version of Wall-E, and as we’ll see, it serves a similar theme.

JusticeLeague88-03

Meanwhile, blissfully unaware of the threat approaching from space, a trio of Justice Leaguers pursue a “busman’s holiday,” working at an archeological dig in the South Seas Islands.  Carter and Shiera Hall have been joined by Hal Jordan of all people, and they are working to uncover clues to lost civilizations.  I love these types of glimpses into the ‘off-duty’ lives of the Leaguers, especially when they are hanging out together.  This is a really fun setup, and I would have enjoyed spending more time with these characters here, but Shiera quickly turns up a tablet inscribed with strange symbols that seem to point to the mysterious continent of Mu.  Just then, lightning strikes her out of a clear sky!  Green Lantern is able to blunt its force, but she’s still stunned, so the heroes suit up, with Hawkman taking his wife to a hospital while Hal contacts the League.

JusticeLeague88-04

In a touch that I quite enjoyed, Aquaman was on his way to join the trio to lend his services in interpreting whatever they found.  If you’re working on lost continents and civilizations, what better expert to call in than the king of just such a place?  It’s a really cool detail, and it proves wise, as he fills Hal in on what the Atlanteans know about Mu: it was an advanced civilization in the pacific that disappeared mysteriously.  The Sea King also brings news that strange disasters are occurring in the Gulf of Persia, the Mekong Delta, and the Coast of California, all of which point to Mu (though how they do so is quite unexplained).  The Emerald Crusader divides the League’s forces to deal with the different disasters and heads out himself, only to be struck by lightning as well, just managing to save himself at the last moment!

JusticeLeague88-05

In California, Batman, Green Arrow, and Black Canary arrive in the Batjet, but there is some tension in the air, as Batman remembers a kiss aboard the Satellite.  When they land, Black Canary pulls the Dark Knight aside, much to Arrow’s chagrin.  After telling Ollie that she’ll talk with whoever she care to, she tells Batman that she wants his advice on how to deal with the hot-headed archer, and she came to him because she thinks of him as a brother!  Ouch!  Bats is stuck in the one trap not even he can escape, the friend zone!  Nonetheless, he takes it like a man, and when the Emerald Archer starts flipping out and demands to take off, the Masked Manhunter even lets them use his plane.  (Real mature, Ollie.  It’s not like lives are at stake or anything.)  It’s a surprising but enjoyable little scene, with a bit of humor and just a touch of pathos, as Batman realizes that the attraction he feels is one-sided.

JusticeLeague88-10

Back on the other side of the world, Superman and the Atom approach the Persian Gulf, where refugees are fleeing a violent set of earthquakes.  The readers get a glimpse of the culprit, a golden medallion, an artifact of Mu, worn about the neck of a respected Iranian man, which serves as a transmitter for the destructive energies of the Mu spacecraft.  The heroes labor in ignorance, however, with Superman doing his best to help the evacuation and save lives while the Atom heads to a lab to try and sort out what is going on.  He stops a few looters and then gets to work, eventually determining the center of the disturbances, but not their cause.

JusticeLeague88-13
As the heroes head towards the epicenter of the quakes, the medallion’s owner smashes it, unwittingly ending the disaster.  Notably, the man, a devout Muslim, is portrayed as wise and selfless in a very positive and sympathetic treatment of Islam for a comic from 1971.  We even get an editor’s note providing a touch of background for the religion, which is surprising.

JusticeLeague88-15

At the same time, in Vietnam, the Flash has his hands full with an out of control monsoon.  Floods are destroying the country, and the Fastest Man Alive is run ragged trying to save lives.  While he labors, a young woman accustomed to tragedy prays to her household gods, another artifact of Mu.

JusticeLeague88-19

In another surprising touch, we’re told her husband was killed by the Viet Cong and her son by American napalm, an unexpected glimpse of the ongoing tragedy unfolding in Vietnam, and one that is handled with an unusually light touch.  Just as Green Arrow and Black Canary arrive and mark the center of the disturbance with a flare, the young woman smashes her idol in rage at its failure to protect her family, ending the storms.

JusticeLeague88-21

JusticeLeague88-23Finally, in California, Batman is left alone to confront the arriving Muian ship, and his valiant but foolhardy barehanded attack against the technological marvel, ends in defeat.  It’s a shame he didn’t have an advanced jet with all kinds of weapons on hand.  Once again, Green Arrow’s temper gets everyone in trouble.  The League just might be better off without him.

The people of Mu have their robotic caretaker snare a youth off of the street to interrogate, trying to discover how their attacks have been defeated.  The young man tells gives them a fiery response about how they are really jealous of the freedom and life that regular humans have, and then escapes the ship.  When it takes off, something suddenly goes wrong and it crashes into the sea, incidentally killing hundreds or thousands of Muians.

JusticeLeague88-25

When his friends ask him what happened, the young man informs them that he threw a wrench into the craft’s engines, thus saving the day….and also committing a touch of genocide!  The story ends with the Leaguers comparing notes and realizing that none of them ended the threats.  Finally, Aquaman recommends that they write this case up as “unexplained.”

JusticeLeague88-26

Yay!  They’re all dead!

This is a fun issue, though the final resolution is really rather too sudden and random, and I’m not quite sure what we’re supposed to make of all of this.  The final narration stresses the theme of the Muians’ plight, the dangers of overreliance on machines, but the message is a tad muddled in delivery.  There’s something here about the triumph of human nature over machines, but it doesn’t quite get developed.  This idea is apparently in the zeitgeist, as we’ve just seen an Aquaman issue on the dangers of over-mechanization.

JusticeLeague88-29

JusticeLeague88-10 - CopyDespite the slightly awkward ending, there are a lot of neat elements in this tale, interesting and thoughtful little touches, like having Aquaman be called in as an expert in lost civilizations, some decently graceful attempts at exposing readers to other cultures, and even a little romantic intrigue.  The lost continent of Mu itself is a really fascinating concept, and it’s a shame it didn’t get a bit more development here, though that’s often the case for comics of this era.  I’m curious if anyone else ever made anything of the seeds planted in this story.  The threat the heroes face is one well suited to the League, and it’s an interesting change of pace that the team doesn’t actually save the day.  Most everyone gets something to do, though Aquaman gets the short end of the stick, as usual.  Dillin’s art is uneven in this one, alternately very strong and rather awkward, but for the most part he turns out a very pretty book.  There are a few just strange looking panels, though, like Batman’s awkward run.  In any event, this is an enjoyable read without the weirdness of the some of our previous issues.  I’ll give this one a solid 3.5 Mintuemen.

minute3.5


New Gods #1


New_Gods_v.1_1Orion Fights for Earth!”
Writer: Jack Kirby
Penciler: Jack Kirby
Inker: Vince Colletta
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Jack Kirby

Now here we go!  Kirby’s New Gods book is, unsurprisingly, the core of his New Gods saga, and it is here where we really begin to learn what’s behind everything we’ve seen teased in the other books.  The cover copy declares that this is “an epic for our times,” and that is a fitting description for the adventure that lies inside.  After all, an epic is usually defined as a long narrative poem of high tone and style dealing with the deeds of a powerful hero, often across a backdrop of the fantastic, and, other than the lack of verse, Kirby’s book does match up to that definition fairly well.  It is certainly a story that is larger than life, mythic in scope and proportions, and that is obvious even here at the very beginning.  In his other Fourth World books, the King has been introducing interesting and exciting new concepts, innovating in smaller ways, but with this book, Kirby begins to do that which he had done in Marvel in the 60s, create something completely new.

The world he conjures is unlike anything seen before, at least in DC Comics.  There are similarities to his Asgardian adventures and the cosmic aspects of his Fantastic Four, but there is a scope here, an imaginative intensity, that is unprecedented.  These are truly new myths being created before our eyes, with just that type of archetypal power, and the end result, however flawed in the particulars as it can be on occasion, is still something incredible.  I love these stories, and it is really a breathtaking experience to go back and read them in the context of what was going on at the time.  Reading them cold in the 21st Century only allows you to experience them obliquely.  You don’t realize how incredibly groundbreaking they were, because what they accomplished has in the decades since become commonplace as swarms of imitators have flooded comics with similar work.  Yet, seeing Kirby’s Forth World burst onto the scene in this book in 1971 really puts into perspective just how revolutionary Kirby was, as he always was.

This first issue is no exception, and from the beginning, you can tell you’re in for something special.  I have to say, though, that the cover is not particularly impressive.  The figure of Orion is a striking one, but the weird coloring has never appealed to me.  I’ve always preferred the recolored versions I’ve seen.  Nonetheless, what’s within does not disappoint.  The tale starts with the fall of the old gods.  In an incredible Kirby splash page, he tells with remarkable narrative efficiency of the Twilight of the Gods, of Ragnarok.  These old gods, who look rather suspiciously like Kirby’s Asgardians, battle one another in an apocalyptic scene, and with a single page, the King wipes away what he had once created in order to begin afresh.  It’s beautifully fitting on many levels.

ng01-03

The conflict ends in the destruction of the world of the gods, which is torn in two, and the two new orbs are left floating in space.  We aren’t told yet, but these will become New Genesis and Apokolips, the eternally opposed homeworlds of the New Gods.  Kirby’s narration throughout this section is, quite honestly, probably some of the best prose he’s ever written.  He really manages to capture the epic tenor he sets out for, and though sections of the book can get a bit clunky, the opening pages set an impressive tone.

ng01-06

Across the vastness of space comes the dramatic figure of Orion, possessor of the “Astro Force,” whatever that means, a warrior who we meet as he returns home to New Genesis, and we’re treated to some incredibly striking visuals of its beautiful floating city and Cyclopean architecture.  He’s greeted by the lighthearted Lightray, a lightning quick young man who flies circles around the dour Orion and implores him to stay in the paradisaical city and “learn to laugh again.”

ng01-07

Their conversation reveals our first hints at Orion’s dual nature, and we get a sense that he is a troubled soul and more than meets the eye.  The warrior has been summoned home to meet with his father, and the New Gods’ leader, Highfather.  The very patriarchal looking Highfather leads his son to “the chamber of the Source,” where they see a white stone wall, their “link with the Source.”  The idea of “the Source” provides a suitably vague and cosmic…well, source, for the powers of good, while still allowing for a surprising compatibility with the concept of the one God and thus folding in rather nicely with DC’s lightly drawn cosmology, even jiving peacefully with my own religious sensibilities.

ng01-08

ng01-10

As the pair stands before the wall, they are joined by Metron, an eternal scholar, a being of intellect, whose outlook has something in common with the cold logic of Star Trek’s Mr. Spock.  It seems there is no love lost between Orion and this newcomer, and their verbal sparring is only interrupted when Highfather communes with this mysterious Source, and a in very biblical image, a fiery finger writes upon the wall and “having writ, Moves on.”  The message it leaves behind is “Orion to Apokolips–then to earth–then to WAR.”  It’s a portentous declaration, but Highfather reminds Orion that, though the Source advises, they still have the freedom to choose, and it is this freedom that separates those of New Genesis from Apokolips.  The young man’s choice leads him across the vast distances between worlds, to war!  As he takes his leave, Metron offers a cryptic statement that reveals he knows that Orion’s true origins lie on Apokolips, and Highfather angrily swears him to secrecy.  I quite like the celestial scholar’s line, “How wonderfully wise is the Source!  Who is more ready to fight the father– than the son!”  It illustrates the archetypal dimensions of the story Kirby is spinning.

ng01-13

ng01-14

To Apokolips Orion flies, and our first glimpse of the grim, gray world is quite stunning, with its ashen surface and massive fire pits.  It looks every inch the archetypal Hell, and as he travels above it, Orion’s thoughts inform us that it is the opposite of New Genesis, a world dedicated to conquest and domination, to the extermination of freedom.  His reconnaissance is interrupted by a trio of Apokaliptian shock troopers, the parademons, which starts a running battle as Orion faces various waves of enemies, including heavy cavalry mounted on giant, vicious dogs!

ng01-15

Most of the troops are visually interesting and imaginatively designed, and the action looks good in Kirby’s wonderfully dynamic style.  In the various skirmishes, we begin to get a sense of Orion’s lust for battle and the dangers of his temper.  Finally, the warrior makes his way to the palace, only to discover that Darkseid has already gone to Earth, but his visit does not go unremarked, as the titanic tyrant’s son, Kalibak the Cruel, is there to greet him.  Their battle is interrupted by the sudden arrival of Metron, who has come to hurry Orion on his way.

ng01-19

ng01-29The scholar warns the warrior of Darkseid’s plans, telling him that the Apokaliptian monarch even now works on a device that will allow him to search all of the minds on Earth for the mysterious and sinister ‘Anti-Life Equation.’  Before vanishing as mysteriously as he appeared, he also reveals that Darkseid began his search there on Apokolips with a quartet of kidnapped humans.  The warrior frees the captives, and holding Kalibak off, opens a boom tube to Earth to help them escape.

ng01-24

Then to Earth they travel, leaving a raving Kalibak behind them, swearing revenge.  Once there, Orion explains to the four he rescued that there is a conflict brewing of universal significance, something far beyond their understanding, and the book ends with him shouting a challenge to Darkseid, a challenge which Darkseid, from his hidden fastness, answers.

ng01-31

ng01-20Then to War!  Wow!  Summarizing this book was a real challenge.  Since so much of this is new and since there are so many big ideas flying around, it is tough to be brief when talking about this story.  In fact, I left some interesting moments untouched, like the glimpse of New Genesis’s culture revealed in Highfather’s reverence for the innocence of youth, which itself is an effective shorthand for his world’s love of freedom and for the stakes for which this galactic game shall be played.  In general, this is a great story, though it will eventually be overshadowed by what comes after.  Kirby’s art is a little rough in some spots, and of course Colletta’s inking doesn’t do him many favors.  None the less, the visual imagination at play is wonderful, with both New Genesis and Apokolips fitting perfectly into their archetypal roles.  Kirby’s imagination is clearly unleashed in this book, and the fruits of his labors are wondrous.  There are Promethean structures everywhere, and many panels stress the scale of the world we’ve entered, as Orion is shrunk to insignificance before a starfield or an ominous edifice.

ng01-21

ng01-16I’ve mentioned how archetypal this story is, and that is an important part of its success, as the King is essentially creating a new myth, working in the broad, bright colors of legend, evoking the eternal struggle of the Norse Gods, the Olympian war against the Titans, or similar cosmic conflicts.  This is a larger scale, a much larger scale, than anything we’ve seen in DC Comics, and clearly already more fully realized than any similar worldbuilding we’ve seen in the last year.  The only parallels can be found in Kirby’s own work in Marvel, but with the Fourth World the King seeks to surpass even those heights .  Think about how astonishing this book must have been when it hit the stands amongst the mundane everyday stories filling DC’s books.  Even this month’s Justice League tale, which has some measure of imaginative reach, feels positively cramped and halfhearted by comparison.  Despite that, he’s doing some pretty solid character work even from this first chapter, especially considering the era.  There are mysteries surrounding Orion, and a lot of personality at play in everyone we meet.  The impression of depth is downright palpable, and you just know that this conflict sprawls far beyond the pages of this book.  What’s more, we can see the lasting impact of this story in the fact that so many of its elements, even just from this first entry, have gone on to become central elements of the DC Universe.  It’s a great beginning, and I can’t wait to read the rest of the series!  I’ll give this first chapter 4.5 Minutemen, as it loses just a little for the clunkier moments.

minute4.5


Superboy #172


Superboy_Vol_1_172“The World of the Super-Ape!”
Writer: Frank Robbins
Penciler: Bob Brown
Inker: Murphy Anderson
Letterer: John Costanza
Editor: Murray Boltinoff
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

“Brotherly Hate!”
Writer: E. Nelson Bridwell
Penciler: George Tuska
Inker: George Tuska
Letterer: Joe Letterese

Oh boy, we’ve got gorillas on the cover!  According to legend, DC’s indefatigable editor, Julie Schwartz, believed (and not without some reasonable circumstantial evidence) that a gorilla on the cover of a comic would boost sales.  Supposedly, the effects were so marked in the Silver Age that all of his editors wanted gorillas for their covers, and he had to institute a policy of no more than one gorilla cover a month!  Whatever the case may be, there sure are tons of gorilla covers from this era of comics!  This particular offering is a fairly striking one, and there’s a nice mystery, which gets a fairly good buildup in the story itself.  As for that very cover story, it has a really ludicrous premise, but the whole thing is handled surprisingly well.  While the concept is very Silver Age, the writing feels a tad more mature.

superboy 172 0003
superboy 172 0004

The tale opens with a recapitulation of Superman’s origin, but this time, there are two rockets headed for Earth.  One crashes in Smallville, and the other, strangely enough, in the heart of Africa, where its inhabitant is adopted by the apes.  Then the scene shifts forward 15 years, where an ivory poacher vanishes after an encounter with a strange shadowy figure.  The preserve officers call in Superboy when they are stumped by the lack of tracks.  A second group of poachers, out to capture gorillas for a zoo, also go missing, once again accosted by a shadowy figure.

superboy 172 0005superboy 172 0006
There’s a nice effect to these mysterious attacks, and Robbins continues to delay the final reveal of the antagonist, granting the first half of this comic a cool, old-school monster movie feel.  Tension mounts from scene to scene as the mystery deepens.  The payoff isn’t quite as good as I had hoped, however.  Eventually, Superboy decides that there must be connection between the apes the poachers were hunting and the mysterious disappearances, so he dresses as a gorilla in order to have the primates lead him back to their tribe….which is pretty silly, but okay.  The apes oblige, and in their cave, the Boy of Steel sees strange statues, idols, and even a magnificent throne, all carved in the likeness of a massive gorilla, and carved by intelligent beings.  Brown does a good job rendering these scenes and granting them a mysterious atmosphere.
superboy 172 0008superboy 172 0010
Inside the cave, Superboy discovers the captured poachers making a break for it, one of them having secreted a gun when they were taken, and he reveals himself in order to help their escape.  The gorillas pose no threat to him until, all of a sudden, a SUPER ape appears, one speaking Kryptonese!  That’s right, he is confronted by a flying, invulnerable gorilla, complete with cape and tights, no less!  They fight but find themselves too evenly matched, even clashing with heat vision in a nice panel.
superboy 172 0015superboy 172 0016
The Boy of Steel decides to try to solve riddle of this obvious fugitive from his homeworld, so he heads back in time and observes a second renegade scientist, the anthropologist an-kal, sending a cybernetically enhanced ape to safety and cursing the Science Council for not approving of his work.  Oookay.  This guy is even crazier than ol’ Jor-El!  What is it with Kryptonian scientists?
superboy 172 0017

“They can be a great people […] They only lack the light to show the way. For this reason above all, their capacity for good, I have sent them you… my only son…err…simian.”

Back in the modern day, Superboy rounds up the escaping poachers and brings them right back to the super-ape, Yango, telling his simian simulacrum that they don’t need to fight.  The youth realizes that the gorilla has dedicated himself to protecting the animal world as he has the human world, and so he is delivering the criminals to his justice and trusting, for some reason, that the gorillas won’t just murder them.  They part as friends, Superboy to continue his work in man’s world, Yango, in that of the animals.
superboy 172 0021
What a goofy concept, and what a goofy visual!  Yango, a gorilla in a full costume, looks pretty silly.  Despite that, this is a fun issue, and the super-fight is pretty entertaining.  It’s also interesting to see Robbins take on the issue of poaching, however obliquely, way back in 1971.  We see in this another attempt on DC’s part for social relevance, and, interestingly, the message doesn’t overwhelm the adventure, unlike some Green Lantern yarns I could name.  In fact, it rather fades into the background amidst the energetic rush of the story.  The first half of the comic is really the best, as the mystery of what is taking the poachers unfolds, but the reveal of Yango himself is, I have to admit, not what I expected.  I’m curious if this oddball character ever appeared again, but I don’t think he did.  If any of you readers know differently, please let me know!  Despite the silliness of the super-simian, I have to say, I enjoyed this read.  The whole tale has something of an Edgar Rice Burroughs, Tarzan feel to it, and that’s a good thing.  I’ll give it 3 Minutemen, as the yarn is entertaining despite its goofiness.
minute3

“Brotherly Hate!”


superboy 172 0022

We’ve got a real treat in the back of this book this month!  After too long in limbo, the Legion of Superheroes returns to the pages of DC Comics!  This starts what will become a regular backup feature for quite some time.  Eventually, the Legion will actually muscle Superboy out of his own book!  This is good news to me, as I’ve really enjoyed the daring deeds of these futuristic do-gooders.  Our story this month is a solid one, with a touch of family drama flavoring the adventure.  It begins with a Legion rocket arriving at the “Interplanetary Bank,” where they discover that the “guardian beasts” have been disabled.  I’m already 100% onboard, as a setting in which there is something called an “Interplanetary Bank” and which is guarded by giant monsters seems pretty promising to me!  The Legion team, Lightning Lad, Timberwolf, and Light Lass discover that the perpetrator was none other than Lightning Lord, the brother of Lad and Lass!

superboy 172 0023

We get a brief reprise of how the trio got their powers, and then, to my delight, we get a nice origin for the Legion itself!  Young Lightning Lad, Garth Ranzz, travels to Earth looking for his brother, and on the ship, he meets the future Cosmic Boy and Saturn Girl, as well as the “richest man in the universe,” R.J. Brande.  When a gang of assassins try to kill Brande, the trio intervene, each using their powers to pitch in.  Brande is thankful, but he is also inspired, so he offers to set the three youths up as superheroes, citing Superboy and Supergirl as examples of teenage heroes.  They all agree, and the Legion is formed.  I’d read summaries of this event, but it is really fun to actually see it played out.

superboy 172 0027

With their flashback over, the team tracks Lightning Lord’s ship, confronting him on a barren and rocky world.  When they confront him, Lightning Lad tries to talk his brother down, but when he refuses, both of the Legionnaire siblings hesitate, causing Timberwolf to spring into action.  The high-voltage villain tries to zap him, but Lightning Lass throws herself in front of the beam to save the boy she loves.  This enrages Timberwolf, but Lightning Lad insists that he face his brother alone.

superboy 172 0029

They are evenly matched, and they throw electrical bolts back in forth to little effect.  Yet, Lightning Lad backs his brother against a metallic cliffside and ricochets a blast into his back, knocking him out, but turning his hair white in the process.  Their sinister sibling captured, the heroes find themselves hoping that he will reform, but something tells me that’s a tad unlikely.

superboy 172 0030

This is an all-too-brief adventure, but it is a fun one.  Bridwell manages to add just enough pathos to the confrontation to make it interesting, and the action is entertaining.  I have to say, though, I think my favorite part is a look at the Legion’s founding.  I suppose I share something of Bridwell’s love of continuity.  That sense of history, of more stories than exist on the page, is key for the “impression of depth” that is such an important part of a well-realized setting.  I’ll give this fun little Legion legend 3.5 Minutemen.

minute3.5


What a set of stories!  We finally get the debut of New Gods, and we get the return of the Legion to boot!  I’ll call that a win.  This finishes off our penultimate batch of books, bringing us to the end of the month, a hearty dose (an overdose?) of Superman!  Please join me again soon for my commentary on those comics as I trudge further Into the Bronze Age!  Until then, keep the heroic ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: March 1971 (Part 3)

DC-Style-Guide-2.jpg
Welcome to another dose of Bronze Age goodness!  We’re moving through March of 1971, and I’ve got a pair of issues and a foursome of stories for you today, my good readers.  I hope that y’all will enjoy my coverage of these comics!

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #398
  • Adventure Comics #404
  • Batman #230
  • Brave and Bold #94
  • Detective Comics #409
  • The Flash #204
  • Forever People #1
  • G.I. Combat #146
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #82
  • Justice League of America #88
  • New Gods #1
  • Superboy #172
  • Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #136
  • Superman #235
  • World’s Finest #201

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


Detective Comics #409


Detective_Comics_409“Man in the Eternal Mask!”
Writer: Frank Robbins
Penciler: Bob Brown
Inker: Frank Giacoia
Letterer: Ben Oda
Editor: Julius Schwartz

“Night of the Sharp Horns!”
Writer: Frank Robbins
Penciler: Don Heck
Inker: Dick Giordano
Letterer: Ben Oda
Editor: Julius Schwartz

We’ve got a decent if not particularly spectacular Batman tale in our headline slot.  It features a mystery that is more about the ‘why’ than the ‘who,’ which culminates in an appropriately dramatic confrontation.  The story begins with an unseen assailant attacking a portrait hanging in a museum and scrawling “Die Jinx, Die!” onto the canvas (shades of Ace Ventura!).  In the morning, the vandalism is discovered, and neither the curator nor the security guard can figure out why or how the artwork was attacked.  After all, it’s a portrait of a beloved philanthropist who no-one had cause to hate.

Detective409-03

Meanwhile, Batman pays a visit to the artist of the piece, Rene Leclerq, where he is due for his own portrait.  That’s a bit odd.  I can’t really see the Dark Knight just standing around in an artist’s studio when he could be prowling the streets.  ‘Well, there’ve been 10 muggings and 3 murders while I sat around here, but that is a darn good likeness!’  Robbins needs the Masked Manhunter to get involved in the plot, but I have to think there was a better way to accomplish that.  Either way, when Leclerq prepares to resume work on the hero’s portrait, he finds it has also been defaced with a similar message.

Detective409-05

Batman reasons that, though there are many people who might find him a jinx, the only connection between this incident and the first is the artist himself.  Though Leclerq can think of no-one who would hold a grudge against him, the Caped Crusader arranges a trap, hoping that a public unveiling of the repaired painting will flush the deranged art critic into the open.  Yet, when the painting is revealed, there isn’t a sign of a telling reaction from anyone in the crowd, though the pair do notice Tracy Calhoun, the “Adonis Athlete,” a football star that the artist had painted five years before.  The Law of Conservation of Detail should make you sit up and take notice of this.

That night, Batman lies in wait for the anti-art attacker, and when a dark figure lashes out at the portrait, he finds more than he bargained for, as it leaps to life and grapples his knife away from him.  The Dark Knight has posed as his own portrait, which is a tad Looney Toons-ish, but I’ll give it a pass.  After a struggle, the vandal lands a lucky blow and knocks the hero out for a while.  Sadly, this doesn’t quite count for our Head-Blow Headcount, as Bats takes it on the chin and not the back of the noggin.

Detective409-10

Nonetheless, when he staggers to his feet, he realizes that the fight actually pointed him to a suspect, as his opponent had a “chin like a rock,” and was obviously very athletic.  This makes him think of Tracy Calhoun, who was described in just such a fashion during his heyday.

Detective409-12

The mystery of why Calhoun would want to destroy Leclerq’s art remains, and when the Masked Manhunter goes to find the artist, he discovers that he’s been called to an unknown client’s house in the middle of the night.  Deducing what is afoot, the Caped Crusader speeds to Calhoun’s house while the young man confronts the artist and explains why he hates him.

Detective409-14

Apparently, on the last day of their sittings, Leclerq begged for a few minutes more after their time had run out, and Calhoun reluctantly agreed.  Then, late for a date, he sped away recklessly and suffered a terrible car wreck that left him horribly scarred.  When the artist protests that he’s as handsome as he ever was, the embittered athlete removes one of those ubiquitous life-like masks, which are apparently available in every corner store in comic universes, to reveal a terrible, shattered visage.

Detective409-15

Clearly insane after the loss of his good looks, which he let define him, Calhoun blames Leclerq for the accident caused by his own recklessness, and he’s decided that the man must suffer.  The former footballer first destroys his own portrait with a saber, then prepares to pinion the painter as well.  Just then, Batman arrives, and while Calhoun holds him at bay for a time, eventually he is once again hoisted by his own petard, as he strikes his portrait while preparing a blow, and the entire heavy painting collapses off the wall, crushing him.  He had accidentally cut the supports when he attacked the artwork, and the object of his hatred destroyed him.  Unfortunately, the final image is rather more comical than tragic, with the madman’s arms and legs poking out of the canvas like he’s a cartoon character.

Detective409-20

This is a solid enough story, and the ‘attractive person turned hideous and embittered’ is an old archetype that still works pretty well.  It was nicely subverted in the Freedom Force villain Shadow, but we’ve seen it played straight many times in comics.  Dr. Doom, anyone?  We certainly all know folks who are too concerned with their appearances, so it isn’t hard to imagine someone so obsessed that a loss of their beauty would send them over the edge.

I enjoy the irony of the final confrontation, as a man who has destroyed his own life by his choices insists on blaming someone else, only to have his continued self-destructive choices finally finish the job.  It’s not the most memorable story, but it does its work well enough, even if it is a bit too rushed to give us much of a real mystery.  I’ll give it an average 3 Minutemen.

minute3


“Night of the Sharp Horns”


Detective409-22

The backup tale, however, once again proves better than the headline.  We pick back up with Batgril’s adventures in Spain as she searches for the mysterious figure who had killed the arrogant but aging El Granados’s bull the night before.  She had just discovered that another sword was missing from the estate, so she takes to the grounds in order to keep a watch.  Her lonely vigil is rewarded with the sight of a cloaked figure slipping into the pastures where he begins to perform multiple passes with the chosen bull, El Aguila.  Babs thinks that his athleticism and agility mark him as Paco, the young firebrand who had rescued the older bullfighter in the ring during his last performance. 

Detective409-23

Detective409-25Just as the stranger prepares to slay his bovine opponent, Batgirl intervenes, snaring his sword in her cape.  When the bull charges, she rescues the trespasser and realizes that her suspicions were correct.

Yet, the young man denies that he had killed the previous bull, and when he escapes (ungrateful punk), she finds her hands full dealing with the now unencumbered El Aguila.  Making like a Minoan, the daring dame leaps over the bull’s horns and runs to the estate’s arena for safety.

Detective409-26

Yet, that safety proves short-lived, as a dark figure appears riding a massive bull!  Charging her like some particularly awesome cavalryman, the bull-rider tries to skewer the young heroine with a sword.  Fortunately, Babs has some skill with a rope, and she lassos the bull, sending her assailant flying into the air.  After hog-tying the beast in a fashion that would make the Vigilante proud, she confronts her attacker, who is revealed to be Manolos, the aged servant of El Granados!

Detective409-29

What was he doing killing his master’s bovine opponents?  He tells the girl detective that he was still faithful, but his master was getting too old to continue his career, so he had set out to kill the bulls before they killed the bullfighter, knowing that former champion was too stubborn to retire.  El Granados himself arrives and confronts his old friend.  While angry at first, he realizes the truth of Manolos’ words, and he agrees not to fight again.  As they reconcile, Batgirl vanishes.

Detective409-30

It’s a nice ending, but it sort of leaves an important point unaddressed.  While everyone can probably forgive the killing of the bulls (except PETA), Manolos did also straight-up try to murder Batgirl.  He attacked her with a sword while mounted on a charging bull.  I don’t think he just wanted to scare her!  That bit of craziness aside, this is a good story, and the two-part tale gives us a surprising amount of character development and drama, while also delivering some nice action.  Batgirl herself comes off much better in this half, as she doesn’t get knocked out by a hat or anything equally embarrassing.  I’m impressed by how successful Robbins is at creating a character-driven mystery with such little space to work with.  The reconciliation between the bullfighter and his mentor is suitably touching, and Paco’s arrogant attempts at stealing his rival’s glory provides a solid, if somewhat unlikely, red herring.  I was impressed with Don Heck’s work on this feature, and I’m not always a big fan of his superhero art.  He turned out several really pretty pages and nice, dynamic action sequences here.  In general, this is a good backup story, doing a lot with a little.  I’ll give it 4 Minutemen.

minute4


The Flash #204


The_Flash_Vol_1_204“The Great Secret Identity Expose!”
Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Irv Novick
Inker: Murphy Anderson

“The Mind-Trap”
Writer: Steve Skeates
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Murphy Anderson

Our Flash headliner for today is something of an oddball.  There’s really not that much too it, and if it weren’t for the fact that last month’s bonkers issue was penned by Robert Kanigher, who is also the schizophrenic scribe responsible for this screwball story, I’d think that it was an attempt to immediately bury the bizarre retcon of that tale.  As is, the yarn seems somewhat pointless.

This outing begins the morning after last issue’s decade-spanning daring-do, with Barry and his wife celebrating their safe return from the future and reminiscing about Iris’s uncovered origin.  I always enjoy these little domestic moments between the couple, and this one has the potential to be charming, though not much is made of it.  They are admiring the locket that had been sent into the past with her when their reverie is interrupted by a call that sets them on a new adventure.  The call summons Iris to cover a banquet honoring a business tycoon, and at the function, the reporter suddenly leaps up and declares that the guest of honor is, in fact, a fraud!

flash204-03

Barry, thinking fast (‘natch), pulls her out of the ballroom, only to discover she has no idea she said anything.  Just then, the police arrive to confirm her declaration.  Apparently, the fellow is a fraud, having kidnapped the real business magnate and masqueraded as him.  Determined newshoud that she is, Iris charges off to get the story, leaving her husband stunned.

flash204-04

He changes in to the Flash, just in case, and on their way back from the banquet, the couple sees a pair of disabled musicians playing for donations on the street-corner.  Suddenly, Iris declares that these two are really disguised fugitives.  Naturally, the hidden hoods don’t take too kindly to this, and the Flash has to take them out as they fill the air with bullets, for all the good it does them.  Once more, Iris has no idea what she’s done and refuses to believe either her husband or the shouted threats of the captured gangsters who promise that their organization, the Generic Gang, will get revenge for her actions.

flash204-07

The next day we get the most interesting part of the issue, where the JLA have a cameo as they arrive en mass to testify in court about one of their cases.  What makes this interesting is that here we’ve got a story that implies the existence of something equivalent to the cape laws in the Watchmen, where superheroes can give testimony in costume, which is neat in a nerdy kind of way.  And after all, nerdy kinds of neat are really our bread and butter here at The Greylands.

flash204-09

Iris is a very stubborn woman.  I sympathize, Barry!

Anyway, as Batman prepares to take the stand, Iris suddenly leaps up and reveals that he is really Bruce Wayne!  Fortunately, once more Barry is quick on the uptake and he chatters his teeth at super-speed in order to scramble the soundwaves of her dramatic courtroom confession.  I guess that makes sense in a comic-booky kind of way, but it’s a bit of a stretch.

flash204-10

Batman, who of course can read lips, realizes what has just happened as the Flash scoops the renegade reporter up and zips her out of the courtroom.  In a telephone booth  Barry again confronts his wife with her actions, and she swears that she doesn’t even known the League’s identities.  Suddenly, Superman summons the Scarlet Speedster and declares that he’s needed for an emergency meeting of the League.  The Fastest Man Alive has to do some fast talking as he tries to explain what even he doesn’t understand.  The JLA is understandably concerned, and Flash tells his teammates that there is clearly something going on and vows that if he doesn’t get it sorted out in 24 hours, they’ll never see him or his wife again.

flash204-13

Superman is being super-pushy.

When he goes to find Iris, the Flash discovers that she’s been kidnapped by members of the Generic Gang, which is gunning for her.  They hustle her into an armored truck, and somehow the man who can move at the speed of light can’t get to their victim before the doors close.  The Fastest Man Alive takes after the fleeing gangsters, taking their pursuit car out in a blink and conveniently overhearing that the door of the armored truck is rigged to blow if opened.

flash204-16

Ahead, the drivers of the truck bail out, sending their vehicle careening into the drink.  The hoods hose down the dock with machine gun fire, but the Flash takes them out easily in an admittedly fun sequence.  He dives off of the dock and tears the armored doors open by projecting his vibrations forward like a cutting beam, which seems a bit out of his usual line, and then zips Iris away before the explosives can blow.

flash204-19

I do enjoy how the entire sequence takes place while the truck is in the air, a nice display of Flash’s speed, if a bit awkwardly handled.

Determined that Iris can’t just be left around to blurt out secret identities willy-nilly, the Scarlet Speedster determines to go to the future with her where both she and his secrets will be safe.  His wife objects that he can’t give up his life (regardless of the fact that he’s also giving up her life), and he replies that she’s his wife, for better or worse, so where she goes, he goes, which is fairly sweet.  However, on the way, their progress is halted, and her locket begins to glow and emit energy waves.  Somehow Barry deduces from basically no evidence that the locket had absorbed some weird temporal energies, and it was the source of her sudden ESP, so they return to their own time and Iris agrees never to wear the necklace again.  Problem solved.

flash204-20

This is a weird little tale.  It’s entertaining enough, but the resolution is pretty random, about as random as the gimmicky conflict that drives the plot itself.  The Generic Gang are little more than mobile obstacles to Barry, offering no real threat to the Fastest Man Alive.  This supervillain drought is really starting to get old.  One wonders just why writers were for so long unwilling to use Flash’s villains, who comprise one of the best rogue’s gallery in comics.  It makes absolutely no sense, though I suppose it’s indicative of a  larger trend.  Super villains are very scarce in general these days.

While the League’s cameo is neat, Kanigher doesn’t really do much with their interview with the speedster.  Almost any line spoken by one of the heroes could have been assigned to another one without making any difference.  Barry’s willingness to give up his life to stay with his wife is sweet, but it really feels like he gives up on solving the problem way too easily.  With all the resources that the League has to bring to bear on something like this, it seems worth at least one visit to the Satellite or something.  In the end, this is a forgettable and somewhat pointless little story, with a goofy, logic-leaping conclusion.  On the plus side, Irv Novick’s art is great on the Flash, if a little light on details in the action sequences.  I’ll give it 2.5 Minutemen.  Man, Kanigher’s score are just all over the place!

minute2.5

In a  fun bit of synchronicity, “The Ballad of Barry Allan” came on my radio station while I was writing this feature.  Very apropos!


“The Mind Trap”


flash204-22

We get another Steve Skeates penned Kid Flash backup here, and I’m always happy to see part of the SAG team in action.  The story Skeates spins is very promising, but unfortunately it’s rather starved for space.  Its premise is an old but enduring one, featuring a mind-hopping villain, something of a telepathic virus, traveling from host to host.  It has shades of many a horror tale, though this version doesn’t manage to harness a harrowing horror tone. 

flash204-23

It begins with Wally West and the rest of his class on a tour of an exhibit on ancient Egypt at the local museum, hearing a legend about a terrible tyrant, Pharaoh Rama-Skeet (Skeates having some fun at his own expense?), who swore that death wouldn’t stop his drive for power.  Just then, a car wreck outside attracts their attention, and the kids watch in wonder as a man pronounced dead suddenly stands up and hurries off in an imperious manner.  Wally switches into his ‘work’ clothes and takes after the apparently stunned man.  When he finds the fellow, the man touches him, and Kid Flash suddenly finds himself fighting a terrible mental battle, realizing that this is the spirit of Rama-Skeet trying to wrest control of his mind.

flash204-26

Wally sinks into darkness and knows no more until he finally comes to himself several minutes later, having just touched someone else.  The young hero watches helplessly as the man undergoes the same mental trauma that he himself had faced, but he wonders why the spirit would leave a super speedster for a regular Joe.  He begins to suspect that the 15 minutes the ghost inhabited his mind might be all the still weakened Pharaoh can manage at once.  This is a bit of a jump, and if the story had more room to breathe, we might have seen this pattern repeated once or twice more to really establish it.  As is, Skeates is working at a feverish pace.

flash204-29

In order to throw the power-mad phantom off his guard as he begins to rant and rave, Kid Flash kneels before him, but this is just a ploy, and the Fastest Boy Alive slams into super-speed, dragging the possessed man behind him.  He plans to keep the host helpless until the 15 minute limit is up in the hopes that the spirit will be destroyed by the host’s mind in that time.  Though the task is incredibly taxing on a body already exhausted by his mental struggle, the teen hero manages to keep up the pace until the Egyptian ghost runs out of time.  With a terrible cry, the specter departs, leaving his host confused but unharmed.  Exhausted but victorious, Kid Flash collapses to rest.

flash204-30

This is a fine little story, but it could have been much, much better with some space to grow.  This kind of challenge, as Wally himself admits, is really out of his line, but his solution to the problem is really fairly brilliant.  Despite that, the very brief tale just didn’t have the time to develop the creepy atmosphere and mystery that these types of plots really thrive on, and the result is that the villain is both entirely forgettable (having almost no real dialog) and not terribly threatening.  That’s a shame, as this could have been much more.  I suppose we must judge a story on what it is and not what it could have been, so I will give this too-brief tale 3 Minutemen, as it is enjoyable if not impressive.

minute3

P.S.: Interestingly, I am apparently not the only fan wondering where all the supervillains have gone.  This issue includes a letter demanding their return and marveling at their long absence.  Notably, this letter is written by future DC luminary, Bob Rozakis!  Rozakis, DC’s future Answer Man, got his start in these very letter columns, which would also be where he would do much of his work on the other side of the pen.  I love things like this, little traces of DC history buried in their letters.  How neat!


And on that note, I’ll wrap up today’s post.  I hope that y’all enjoyed my commentary and found something interesting and worth your time herein.  Though these weren’t the most amazing issues, they have their moments.  The real highlights of this month await in the books to come.  Our next post will introduce Forever People #1, the next Kirby Fourth World book, so don’t miss that!  Until then, keep the Heroic Ideal alive!

Into the Bronze Age: February 1971 (Part 7)

DC-Style-Guide-1

Welcome to the final installment of Into the Bronze Age for February 1971!  It’s been a pretty solid month of comics, featuring some telling signs of the times.  For our final story this month, we’ve got an unusual World’s Finest, featuring a team-up between a hero and someone else’s sidekick, which is a fun change of pace.  So, shall we forge further Into the Bronze Age?

If you’re new to this little journey, you can check out the first post to learn what it’s all about.


Roll Call


(You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #397
  • Adventure Comics #402
  • Aquaman #55
  • Batman #229
  • Detective Comics #408
  • The Flash #203
  • Justice League of America #87 (AND Avengers #85-6)
  • The Phantom Stranger #11
  • Superman’s Girlfriend, Lois Lane #108
  • Superman #234
  • Teen Titans #31
  • World’s Finest #200

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.


World’s Finest #200


World's_Finest_Comics_200“Prisoners of the Immortal World!”
Writer: Mike Friedrich
Penciler: Dick Dillin
Inker: Joe Giella
Cover Artist: Neal Adams

Don’t be fooled by this striking cover.  That mighty orange skinned alien is not, in fact, Mongul.  No, unfortunately, it’s a much less interesting villain.  Every time I see this cover, it takes me a moment to realize that the big, orange skinned guy in the purple costume with the yellow shape on his chest isn’t the cruel conqueror.  Nonetheless, the story within is an enjoyable one, even if it makes me wonder when we’ll see the alien annihilator in the Bronze Age.  Apparently he won’t make the scene for another decade!

Anyway, the story at hand is a bit uneven, combining several very different elements.  It begins, just like this month’s Titans issue, on a college campus.  This time, it’s Hudson University, the stomping grounds of the Teen Wonder himself, Robin.  The school is beset by protests and demonstrations, and Dick is right in the thick of it, helping to keep the peace.  The scene is being covered by Mr. Mild Mannered, Clark Kent, when suddenly the ROTC building gets firebombed!  What follows is really quite interesting from a historical point of view.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 003

During the 60s and 70s, there were several bombings of campus buildings that had a link to the military, so this little episode is drawn directly from the headlines of the day.  What’s more, in response the military moves in to take control of the situation, which intriguingly causes Superman to spring into action, as he reasons that soldiers on campus are apt to make the situation even more unstable in light of the Kent State Shootings and similar events.  The Man of Steel appeals to the governor and obtains orders for the troops to return to base, leaving the University in the hands of the campus police and the heroes and perhaps defusing some of the tension.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 004

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 005Yet, not everything is resolved by this move, and Robin overhears two brothers, Davy and Marty, in a heated argument about the military.  They appeal to the young hero to help them settle matters, and as he tries to separate the two, Superman flies down and scoops them all up so that they can continue the conversation in more peaceful surroundings.

So far, we’ve got an interesting social story with some promising generational elements, but just at that point, the comic takes a hard left turn.  The quartet is swept through space by some type of teleportation beam (described, for some reason, as “magnetic body-grabbers,” because that’s how magnets work) and to an alien world.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 006

This is the home of a pair of immoral immortal brothers who, as they helpfully tell us, drain the power from captured super-beings to extend their lifespans.  They are currently over 150,000 years old!  The two bicker over the prospects for their next victim, and there’s the potential for some interesting parallel development between these brothers and the human siblings, but it doesn’t come together.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 007

The perfidious pair have set their sights on Superman, and when he arrives with his young companions, they use their “mind bands” to blast them with mental bolts, and Friedrich makes the first of a few strange choices, as the aliens talk about how the Man of Tomorrow’s body is invulnerable, despite the fact that they are presumably attacking his mind.  This will become a problem at the climax of the tale.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 010

With the Kryptonain captured, the immortals just dump Robin and the other two students in the inhospitable jungle of their world.  Inexplicably, we get a one-page origin and catch-up for Robin, which seems rather unnecessary.  Who doesn’t know who Robin is?  After wasting a page, we pick back up with the teen trio in a nicely bizarre alien setting.  Despite the wonder and terror of their situation, the two brothers immediately resume their fight.  Interestingly, Robin calls them ‘jackasses,’ which I was surprised to see in a Comics Code book.  His cool-headedness and impatience with their stupidity is entertaining.  The Teen Wonder organizes his little party, telling the boys to travel along the ground while he takes to the trees to act as a scout, and they make their way back towards the aliens’ citadel.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 013

Shortly, they are attacked by a group of hunters to whom they’ve been sold as game by the immortals.  They’re riding a massive, nicely exotic looking, horse-like creature, and they are thundering down upon the brothers.  Fortunately, Robin rescues Davy, though Marty gets mind-blasted.  The Teen Wonder is in his element up in the alien canopy, and he launches an acrobatic attack that allows him to scatter the stalkers.  Taking their ‘mind-bands,’ the trio continues their trek, soon arriving at the alien city.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 016

I always enjoy seeing Robin being awesome!

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 018Meanwhile, the immortals have strapped Superman into their machine, only for him to burst free!  The Man of Steel quickly makes short work of their defenses, but they hit him with another mental beam, and he awakens to discover he’s been recaptured again.  It is then that the teen team arrives, and Robin takes out the guards with a batarang before leading an assault on the immortals and freeing the Metropolis Marvel.  Interestingly, Superman is held, not by bonds, but by a prison of the mind.  His escape and recapture was all in his head, designed to make him believe that freedom was impossible, which is a neat idea.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 020

Fighting Mad, the Man of Steel sets out to get his revenge, but the staging of the conflict is a bit odd.  Robin clearly freed him from the room that the immortals were in, yet the Kryptonian leaves by busting through the wall and goes somewhere else to attack them.  The internal continuity is a bit wonky here, and the scene that follows is where Friedrich makes his other strange choice.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 026_27

Pictured: half of a great two-page spread.  What the devil is going on with his legs?

The immortals recover and attack Superman, who overcomes them, not with his super strength, heat vision, or what have you, but by overwhelming their mental attacks with is own mental bolts.  That’s right, suddenly Superman has become Professor X!  It makes no sense, and there’s no way that he should be able to do this, making the resolution just feel cheap, especially because the immortals were already defeated by Robin and the others.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 029

The adventure helps Marty and Davy to realize that each of them has some merits in their points of view, and they shake hands, ending their argument.  The issue concludes with Clark Kent reporting on the boys’ strange experiences, focusing on the new unity between the brothers and hoping that the world can learn something from their example.

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS 200 030

There are a lot of good elements in this story, but they don’t combine into a single whole very smoothly.  The campus chaos raises some good questions, and the idea of real dangers helping us to put our differences in perspective is certainly a good one.  Yet, their intergalactic exploits are a bit too out-there for the moral to be as effective as it might be.  How often are aliens going to kidnap us to another world to be hunted for sport?  Well, I suppose the chance is significantly higher in the DC Universe.  Still, something more domestic might have been more effective as far as the message of the issue goes.  The alien adventure was good fun on its own merits, however, and it was great to see Robin in action, proving his independence and resourcefulness.  I really enjoyed how unflappable he was in the face of this crazy circumstance.  Superman’s inexplicable mental powers really take something away from the story, though.  Dick Dillin’s work is quite good for the most part here, especially on the alien flora and fauna, but he has a few weird panels throughout, like the two-page spread above.  I suppose I’ll give this one 3 Minutemen.  It evens out, more or less.

minute3


Final Thoughts:


We have certainly had a very interesting month in this batch of books.  The stories have tended to be solid rather than stellar, and we’ve had a number of rather disappointing outings, with a few previously reliable books turning out weaker offerings, like Lois Lane.   Nonetheless, there is a good deal to catch our interest here.  The growing focus on youth culture and youth involvement is on great display, providing a definite common theme being shared by many of this month’s issues.  Dissatisfied young people fill the pages of everything from Teen Titans to Aquaman, showing up in a good number of surprising places, like today’s World’s Finest.  It seems like everywhere the unrest on the nation’s campuses, the spirit of rebellion and independence in the youth of the day, is reflected in the pages of these comics.  What a change from only a year before!  There’s a growing sense of the importance of the youth and their voice in society, a more serious treatment of the younger generations as a whole.  This is producing stories that are uneven but interesting.

In the same way, we’re also seeing increased moral and political maturity appearing with greater regularity, like this months’ Superman and Phantom Stranger.  While the Man of Steel’s adventure emphasizes a more nuanced ethos than just law=good, the Stranger’s title actually takes a surprisingly sober and realistic (however brief) view of the cycle of vengeance and the conflict in the Middle East.  Of course, there’s also still some more ham-handed attempts at the same, like Mike Friedrich’s weak-sauce, tacked-on anti-war message in JLA.

Speaking of which, this month also saw the first unofficial crossover between the JLA and the Avengers, which was fascinating to explore.  I really enjoyed the chance to read books across the Big Two and compare them, and the process really put the different approaches of DC and Marvel into context for me.  It was quite an eye-opening experience to directly compare the JLA and Avengers books, and I think that might have been my favorite part of this month’s coverage.  The comparison revealed the greater sophistication of Marvel’s storytelling and characterization in contrast to DC’s greater imaginative breadth.

We also saw the continued activity of the League of Assassins in the Bat-books, which forms one of the longer-running plot threads we’ve observed so far.  We’re still in a period of mostly self-contained stories, which makes the Aquaman title’s layering in of plot threads all the more innovative and exciting.  Continuing plots do seem to be becoming a bit more common, which is interesting because around this time Marvel handed down an editorial mandate to eliminate continued stories.  I’m curious to see how this trend develops.

This was undoubtedly a fascinating month.  I hope that all you readers enjoyed the journey with me, and I also hope y’all will share your thoughts and reflections as well.  Please join me soon as we begin our travels through March 1971.  Until then, keep the heroic ideal alive!


The Head-Blow Headcount:

Aquamanhead.jpgBatmanhead.jpgshowcase-88-fnvf-jasons-quest0robin2 - Copy.jpgPhantom_Stranger_05.jpgrobin2 - Copy.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpgAquamanhead.jpg3072564469_1_3_hCmU7jwq.jpg

arrowheadglheadAquamanhead.jpgAquamanhead.jpgAquamanhead.jpgbatman-family-6-cover.jpg2f52ff2370b3a87769869427faeac69d

This month saw two new additions to the Wall of Shame, with both Batgirl and Hawk joining the august company here.  It was a bad month for teens, but at least Robin didn’t have a return engagement, though I’m sure he’ll be back before too long.  Let’s just hope Aquaman can stay away for a little while.  Three in a row was enough!