Doc Savage and the Fabulous Five

I was so excited after I finished this batch of updates for my latest project that I just had to share this image.  The Pulp mod is now just one character away from completion!  Doc Savage and his fantastic aides are all in and ready to face whatever dangers this action-packed adventure have to throw at them!  Thanks to the amazingly talented and wondrously prolific Daglob, a fellow pulp fan, these six heroes are united for the first time in the history of Freedom Force, and to the best of my knowledge, the first time in a video game!  From left to right, you see ‘Long Tom’ Roberts,’ ‘Johnny’ Littlejohn, Doc Savage, ‘Ham’ Brooks, ‘Renny’ Renwick, and ‘Monk’ Mayfair.  Each of them has a unique set of abilities that reflect their portrayals, and each has a fantastic skin and skope.  Pulp fans be on the look out for Pulp Adventures, coming soon!  It features all of your favorite pulp characters, like the Shadow, the Green Hornet, the Lone Ranger, Zorro, and many, many more.  It will feature over 25 playable characters!

 

Into the Bronze Age: July 1970 (Part 1)

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Holy Hannah!  I began writing this post all the way back at the beginning of summer, and here we are at its end.  My how the time has flown by!  I’ve been hard at work on my mods, finishing two of them during these months, Marvel Adventures Vol. 2 and Pulp Adventures, both of which will be released soon.  Know my time has been well spent!  Well, if this post won’t kick off the summer, at least it can be the beginning of a fond farewell, with another journey Into the Bronze Age!  Join me as we begin to explore the comics of July 1970.  *Sigh*  I was almost ahead there for a while!

This month in history:

  • Unrest continues in Ireland, with riots and clashes aplenty
  • The first 747 takes to the skies
  • America’s Top 40 debuts on the radio with Casey Kasem (of course best known to this particular commentator as the voice of Robin and Shaggy)
  •  Libya orders confiscation of all Jewish property
  • USSR performs nuclear tests
  • Race riots in Asbury Park and Hartford

The top song this month was Three Dog Night’s “Mama Told Me (Not to Come),” which is great fun!

As you can see, it was a pretty ugly month, with unrest and conflict everywhere you look, along with a healthy does of Cold War saber rattling.  Let’s see if the comics reflect that harsh climate or offer us an escape!

Roll Call (You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #390
  • Batman #223 (reprints, won’t be covered)
  • Brave and the Bold #90
  • Challengers of the Unknown #74 (Final issue!)
  • Detective Comics #401
  • G.I. Combat #142
  • Green Lantern #78
  • Superman #227 (Reprints)
  • Superman #228
  • World’s Finest #193

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.

Action Comics #390

Action_Comics_390.jpg“The Self-Destruct Superman”
Writer: Cary Bates
Penciler: Curt Swan
Inker: George Roussos

“The Tyrant and the Traitor”
Writer: E. Nelson Bridwell
Penciler: Win Mortimer
Inker: Jack Abel

The headline tale in this issue was a Silver Age-y miss, but as seems to be the rule for these Action Comics books, the Legion backup saved the day.  The Superman story isn’t bad per se, but it does engage in several of the common Silver Age Superman tropes that I rather heartily dislike.

The Man of Steel’s adventure starts with a slight tremor dislodging something buried deep beneath the White House.  Suddenly, a strange device is accidentally activated, and the President, in classic comic shadows, calls the Man of Tomorrow to warn him that “it” is coming for him.  It seems that Superman gave the President a secret weapon to use against him if he should go rogue.  I wonder what Batman would give to have one of these tucked away for a rainy day.  Of course, if the President had this thing, one wonders why it wasn’t used on any of the zillion occasions where the Last Son of Krypton went nuts because of Red Kryptonite, brainwashing, or just because it was Tuesday.

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Nonetheless, the mysterious mechanism hunts Superman all across the Earth and even into the past!  He can’t seem to shake it, no matter what he does.  He tries flying through the eruption of Krakatoa in 1883, and he even leads the device into the path of the gigantic meteor that struck Arizona in the distant past.  That last one manages to bury the weapon for a time, though, if it is capable of time travel, it seems like it could just make that time up by going back a little earlier…time travel!

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Well, nothing the Man of Steel does manages to do so much as scratches this thing, and the reason why, such as it is, gets revealed when Kal-El is contacted by a Kandorian scientist.  Apparently the device comes from Krypton, so “it’s super like me,” as our hero declares…and that brings us to my biggest problem with this issue.  This is a common trope from the worst part of the Silver Age Superman mythos.  Writers apparently forget their own setup for the character, that he is super powered because of the interaction of his biology and the conditions on Earth, like the yellow sun.  Simply being from Krypton doesn’t make an inanimate object super.  This is the kind of breakdown in story logic that bugs me.

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Well, back to our story.  Before the scientist can tell the Last Son of Krypton (except for all of those other kryptonians in Kandor), the weapon arrives, sending the hero running for cover.  For some reason, he is filled with paralyzing fear whenever it approaches.  Superman used ‘self-hypnosis’ to remove knowledge of the device from his mind to protect its efficacy, but the Kandorian managed to give him one last tip before he had to flee.  The machine is tracking the Metropolis Marvel through his brainwaves.  Taking a desperate gamble, Superman puts on a “relaxer hood,” a trophy from his space adventures that blanks out a person’s mind.  Unable to track non-existent brainwaves, the device self-destructs!

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When the hood shuts off, Superman visits Kandor and gets the whole story from his friend.  It seems this machine was actually created by Jor-El, his father, who apparently left this incredibly dangerous weapon just lying around his back yard, where a young Kal stumbled across it.  Way to go, Jor, real father of the year move there.  After accidentally activating the kill-bot, the boy was fortunately saved by his father, who deactivated its weapons permanently.  The even left an indelible mark on Kal-El’s psyche, causing him to be terrified of the gadget even years later.

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This isn’t a bad story, despite it’s glaring logical flaw.  That does hurt it, but the basic premise of Superman facing a threat that he can’t outdo physically is a solid one, done many times over the years, of course.  His solution is reasonably clever, but the whole thing doesn’t really come together in any particularly impressive way.  I’ll give it 2 Minutemen, knocking it down a bit because of the stupidity of the ‘ohh, it’s from Krypton, this inanimate object must be super in the same way as a living organism!’ bit.

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“The Tyrant and the Traitor”

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Now this Legion tale is much more promising, displaying a sophistication and a potential that is decidedly more impressive than the headline story.  The basic setup is very interesting, with a pleasantly surprising complexity and a sociological realism.  The premise is that there is an uprising in progress on the planet Lahum, a world ruled by the tyrannical “President Peralla,” who has his sights set on galactic conquest.  Unfortunately, the rebels are not any better, being led by a vicious fellow named Diol Masrin who, even worse, is just a pawn for some sinister sounding organization called the Dark Circle.  At the moment, the conflict is merely planetary, thus the United Planets cannot intervene, but the Legion, being a private organization can.  What a set-up!  Minus the sci-fi trappings, this could easily be the plot for a solid G.I. JOE story from the awesome Larry Hama comic run.  Those stories often featured morally ambiguous situations that the heroes had to navigate, choosing between two evils or the like.

Apparently, this operation is to be undertaken by the Legion’s “Espionage Squad,” which I didn’t even know existed.  How neat!  Chameleon Boy is the head, and we get a rather nice Mission Impossible-esq scene with him picking his team.  The undercover operatives will be Brainiac 5, Timber Wolf, Element Lad, Saturn Girl, and Karate Kid.  The Legionnaires have to infiltrate the rebels by hijacking a shipment of contraband weapons from a crew of smugglers, and then posing as gun-runners to make contact.

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Once on Lahum, the Legionnaires jump the rebel officer who comes to inspect the guns, with the help of Proty, Cham’s shape-shifting pet, disguised as one of the weapons.  Chameleon Boy himself takes the officer’s place, with the help of Saturn Girl’s telepathy, and the The other Legionnaires pose as volunteers for the rebel force.

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Their infiltration is running quite smoothly until their column is hit by the “Humanoids,” artificial troops of the planetary tyrant who are rumored to be unstoppable.  The Legion pitch in during the battle to maintain their cover, blazing away with the newly acquired blasters, but the strange foot-soldiers reform as soon as they are blown apart!  The situation looks hopeless until Element Lad disables the Humanoids by turning the ground under their feet to mercury, sinking them into the very earth…err…Lahum.

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Once in the rebel camp, the team makes contact with Masrin, pretending to be fellow operatives of the Dark Circle.  They are welcomed with open arms, but a little later Cham discovers that the officer he’s impersonating has a sweetheart in camp, and he has to do some smooching to keep his cover.  It’s a fun little detail, and Chameleon Boy’s “the things I go through for the Legion” line made me chuckle.

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Meanwhile, Saturn Girl has split off to infiltrate the other side of this conflict, and she poses as a science student in order to get a position as a research assistant with the tyrants chief scientist.  There’s a nice little moment when she reaches the capitol, as she is disgusted by the “primitive” conditions that Peralla’s rule imposes on his subjects.  There are no moving sidewalks or flying cars, how dreadful!  It’s a good touch to the setting, the idea that technological development and infrastructure would be different on a world like this, under the heel of a dictator.

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The tale ends with the chief scientist conferring with a young assistant of his about whether or not to hire the undercover Legionnaire, and we are greeted with a cliffhanger as the girl answers that she knows the heroine’s identity!  Dun, dun, DUNNN!

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This is a great tale, with some solid action, but the best part of it is the maturity of the set-up.  You’ve got some moral complexity as well as some science fiction trappings.  The heroes are up against a challenge that is not only going to be very difficult to overcome, removing BOTH the rebel leader AND the powerful Peralla, but also quite interesting.  Bridwell squeezes a great deal in only a few (12) pages.  He does a fantastic job of being economical with his storytelling, yet still providing everyone with something to do and developing the principal characters, like Chameleon Boy and Masrin, very effectively in the limited space.  This story doesn’t have the space to be flat-out amazing, and it is still just a solid adventure tale.  Nonetheless, I’m very impressed.  It was by far the most interesting yarn I read in this batch.  I’ll give this one 4 Minutemen.  The strength of the setup really takes it a long way in my book.

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Brave and Bold #90

Brave_and_the_bold_90.jpg“You Only Die Twice!”
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito
Editor: Murray Boltinoff

This is a weird one, definitely fairly Zaney Haney.  While I like Adam Strange and would be happy to see him guest star in Brave and Bold, he really doesn’t do so here.  The Hero of Rann is essentially just a plot device, having almost no part in the actual story other than to instigate some of the events.  This is one of those left-field stories that put Bayman through the type of arc that would be a “bold new direction” these days, lasting months or years and drastically altering the character’s status-quo.  For Haney, though, this is a Tuesday.  The ridiculous events of this tale are precisely the type of thing that gave rise to the phrase, Earth-Haney, as such things really don’t fit in with the main DCU, no matter how Silver Age-y it is at a given moment.

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Get ready.  This is going to be a weird, wild ride.  This zaney yarn begins with Batman interrupting a mob hit in a barbershop, saving the life of a notorious criminal named Jarrett, but apparently losing his own in the process!  That’s right, Batman catches a burst from a Thompson submachine gun, and he goes down for the count.  The EMTs load him into an ambulance, and just as they are preparing to leave, a reporter wonders aloud what Batman’s place in history will be and what his obituary will look like.

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Strangely enough (or naturally enough in a Haney story), this snaps the Dark Knight back from the brink, and he awakens, surprising the heck out of the medics.  After his narrow scrape with death, Bruce Wayne broods about how he will be remembered when he dies.  One might pause to wonder how the recovering, wheelchair-bound Wayne managed to escape from the doctors and EMTs with his secret identity intact, seeing as he almost died, but then one would be expecting too much logic out of a Bob Haney story.

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Later, we get our plot device appearance from Adam Strange, who just shows up while Batman is patrolling the streets.  The Hero of Two Worlds tells the Caped Crusader a strange story, relating how his usual Zeta Beam transit between Rann and Earth was interrupted by solar flares, which somehow shunted him into the future.  During his brief stay, he saw  Batman’s obituary!  He managed to snag part of the article before he was pulled back through time, but unfortunately the date didn’t make the trip.  What’s more, the obituary contains some strange and ominous information.  It declares that Batman died in disgrace, having betrayed those close to him and pushed everyone away (so, like modern Batman then?).  There’s a funny, though rather ill-fitting scene where Batman wanders distractedly through the middle of the Gotham street, completely absorbed by the article.

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brave and the bold 090 010.jpgHe narrowly avoids all kinds of troubles, finally bumping into a businessman named Mike Morrison, who tells the Dark Knight that he’s being hunted by the same thugs who were after Jarrett at the beginning of the story.  Apparently he was desperate and took a kickback, which the mob used to blackmail him.  When he refused to pay, they sent trigger men after him.  Bat’s saves Morrison from a gunman, then goes to have a word with the syndicate behind them.  Here we get one of those bizarre Haney moments, as Batman cuts a deal with the criminals to protect Morrison because he has no proof of their wrong-doing.  Instead of, you know, beating a confession out of these thugs or dangling them off of a rooftop or anything, the Caped Crusader agrees to just let them do whatever they want for two weeks.  Imagine that.  Doesn’t that seem entirely anathema to Batman?  Well, not in the Haneyverse.

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Of course, this is all a setup, and Batman is smeared for making a deal with them.  Publicly humiliated, he loses his temper and belts the mob’s lawyer in front of city hall, opening the city to a lawsuit.  Sheesh, I’m running out of energy!  Well, to skim over this tangled web of Haney madness, Commissioner Gordon resigns in protest for…reasons, and the Dark Knight gets bitter and hangs up his cowl.  He drives Alfred away, brooding over his coming death and the seeming inevitability of his fate.

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I have to admit, Batman at a hearing in front of a committee is a pretty funny image…

So, he does the natural thing…runs off to Rann.  Yep, he catches a Zeta beam with Adam Strange and hides out on another planet, figuring he can’t die on Earth if he’s not actually on Earth.  That’s actually pretty solid reasoning, if one has the resources to flee the solar system when necessary.  Here we get a nice little montage of Batman doing touristy things on Rann, which is actually rather fun.  Nothing manages to cheer him up.

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brave and the bold 090 025.jpgYet, his fate does seem inescapable.  Watching an invention of Sardath, the Masked Manhunter observes a scene on Earth, witnessing Alfred having lost his life savings to the mob and being threatened by the thugs.  They want him to badmouth Batman in order to expiate his debt, but the loyal old retainer refuses, knowing that death will be his reward.  Millions of miles away, the Dark Knight realizes he has no choice.  He must return and face his own death in order to save his oldest friend.  We get an admittedly cool panel of his interplanetary transit via Zeta beam, and then a moodily inked but awkwardly drawn sequence where Batman infiltrates an Ellis Island stand-in known as Immigrant Island, where the gang is holding Alfred.

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Apparently the great Detective has lost a step during his retirement, because a gunman gets the drop on him.  It looks like this will be all she wrote for Batman, until a gloved hand knocks the gunsel’s weapon aside.  Adam Strange to the rescue!  Yep, deus-ex Adam decided he couldn’t let his friend face his destiny alone, so he came along, and this is the first and last useful thing he does in this issue.

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The two heroes rescue Alfred…or rather, Batman rescues Alfred, and Adam Strange strikes a pose.  Seriously, Alfred does more in this scene than the ‘Hero of Two Worlds.’  Batman should have brought John Carter along.  The original dual-planetary hero would have been more help.  In fact, I’d read the HECK out of that story…anyway, I suppose I can’t put off this summary any longer.  Bruce and Alfred bury the hatchet, and the Dark Knight realizes that he jumped to a conclusion about that newspaper fragment.

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We end with what Rob Kelly likes to call the ‘Friendly Farewell,’ and a note about the inscrutability of fate.  All’s well that ends well…except for the damage done to Batman’s reputation, Bruce Wayne’s life, and Gordon’s career!  Ohh yeah, those things are just completely ignored, as one would expect from a Zaney Haney story.  It reminds me a bit of the totally complete solution to global warming from Futurama.  The problem is solved once and for all.  ONCE AND FOR ALL!

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As you can probably tell, this story didn’t exactly grab me.  Writing this summary was something of a tortuous undertaking, trying to keep all of the random Haney touches straight and make it make sense on the page wasn’t easy.  I can only assume that Haney just sat down at a typewriter, banged out a script, and never looked back to see if it made any sense.  Sometimes he came up aces, and sometimes he didn’t.  This isn’t the worst example of Zaney Haney-ness, but it isn’t a particularly good one either.  There could be a good story here, with a character’s struggle against fate and all that, but it doesn’t really reach that point.  In the end, I’d give this one 2 Minutemen.  It’s not great, but it isn’t terrible either.

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Challengers of the Unknown #74

Challengers_of_the_Unknown_Vol_1_74.jpg“To Call a Deadman”
Writer: Dennis O’Neil
Penciler: George Tuska and Neal Adams
Inker: George Tuska and Neal Adams
Editor: Murray Boltinoff

This is and isn’t the final issue of the Challengers.  This is the final issue of new material, sadly.  After this story, the book becomes a reprint title.  This is a shame because, as we’ve seen, this team is just starting to hit it’s stride.  George Tuska definitely turns in a fabulous job on pencils, and O’Neil delivers an interesting and entertainingly eerie supernatural yarn with the plot.  Once again, we see the Challengers dealing with something that really should be a bit out of their line, but we have a pleasant surprise that makes this tale work better than some of the others, a guest star known as Deadman!  Neal Adams lends his considerable talents to the Deadman portions of the story, so this is one fine looking issue.

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The book in question opens in suitably atmospheric fashion, with Deadman inviting us to enter his world of mystery and spirit, and we meet a frantic man pounding upon the doors of a crumbling stone prison.  The door is opened by a twisted little man, and the visitor, an older fellow named Dr. McJames, declares that he has what was promised, a huge ruby.  Just as the old timer is preparing to hand over the jewel, a voice rings out in the night, and who should appear but Johnny Double!  He’s DC’s answer to the hard-boiled detective, and I was surprised to discover that he had only been around a short time at this point, having debuted in 1968.  I rather expected that he was a character from the 50s, but apparently he’s late Silver Age.

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This is a nice little cameo, and he serves as our entrance into the story, catching us up on the plot and helping to bring the Challengers into the action.  He was apparently hired by the museum for which Dr. McJames works to determine if the scholar was stealing, and Johnny just caught him red handed.  It seems the ruby which was to be the currency of this late night assignation belonged to the museum’s collection.  Yet, the gumshoe knows that there is more to this than meets the eye, and he contacts to our heroes to see what that might be.

We catch up the Chals in a great panel with Red practicing his acrobatics and Rocky taking up painting, as he says, trying to improve his mind, “glom up some of that culture…refinement.”  His expression in that panel is just priceless, instantly establishing the character.  I don’t know if he’s ever more reminded me of the infinitely likable Ben Grimm.  I definitely am enjoying the characterization work O’Neil is doing with these guys.

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Interestingly, it has just occurred to me that we’re seeing a rather unusual cycle of influence here.  The Challengers of the Unknown inspired the creation of the Fantastic Four, and now the Fantastic Four is being drawn on in order to flesh out the personalities of the Challengers themselves.  In fact, even the tumultuous relationship between two members of the team has been adapted for this book.  Just as the The Thing and the Human Torch are always fighting with one another, so Rocky and Red are always in conflict here.  It’s notable that the ersatz Thing’s antagonist is the ‘fiery’ member of the team, Red.  I suppose it isn’t terribly original, but then again, what in comics, or any other literature, is?  Twenty-three hundred years ago Solomon said “there’s nothing new under the son,” and I suppose it’s even more true now than it was then.

Well, their customary brawling is interrupted by the arrival of the rest of the crew, along with Johnny Double.  He fills them in on what he knows, which isn’t a whole lot, and points them in the direction of the mystery.  The fabulous foursome (actually a quintet at the moment, with Prof. tagging along), attempt to interview the the troubled scholar, but he refuses to talk!  Not one to be so easily stymied, Corinna uses her amazing powers of deus ex machina…err…I mean hypnosis.  Right, hypnosis.  She’s apparently a skilled hypnotist, as well an expert on mystical lore, a magician, and whatever else the plot requires her to be.  It’s a bit weak, but at least it is vaguely in the same vein as some of the skills we’ve already seen her demonstrate, and we’re far enough along in her tenure on the team that it isn’t quite as jarring as other inexplicable skills she’s evinced.  And, to be fair, it’s a lovely page.

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Of course, there’s a bit of an ethical dilemma here, what with hypnotizing someone against their will, and while it isn’t solved, I’m pleased to see O’Neil at least acknowledge it.  Red, of course it’s Red, raises an objection, but Corinna pleads necessity as she sensed “that he’s in deep trouble.”  Under the influence of her mesmerism, Dr. McJames relates his story, and an odd one it certainly is.  Apparently, his daughter fell ill, and medical science was helpless.  Suddenly, a spectral figure in 18th Century dress appears and sucks his child’s very spirit into a small, coffin shaped box!  The ‘ghost’ claims that he has taken her soul as revenge because one of the good doctor’s ancestors sentenced him to hang.  Yet, the spirit offers a bargain, the museum’s ruby in exchange for the soul of his only daughter!

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The Challengers decide to take the case and try to free the girl’s spirit, but Ace asks Prof. to stay behind because he is still recovering, a request to which the Prof. concedes…but with silent, though bitter, frustration.  Of course, this also serves as another chance for Red to be a jerk to Corinna.  O’Neil is really playing up the jerk angle with his character.

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The team heads to the ominous tower in search of the spirit box, which Corinna suspects is the key to the mystery.  When they arrive, they are greeted by the specter who threatened McJames, seemingly hanging from a gallows, offering cryptic and threatening warnings.  Trying to comfort a shaken Corinna, poor Rocky gets rebuffed once more, but while woe-is-me-ing, the hulking hero is toppled headlong by an unexpected attack.  That strange little man from the beginning of the tale hurtles out of the night, scattering the Challengers like ten-pins.  Before they can recover, he hi-tails it into the tower and bars the door, which only momentarily delays the mighty Rocky.

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Once inside, the quartet play a dangerous game of cat and mouse with the weird little fellow, eventually culminating in an acrobatic altercation in the rafters, as Red and Ace corner him.  The Igor-esq little fellow, named Nodo, apparently serves the ghostly villain of the piece, and he’s determined to protect the casket, but the vital McGuffin is smashed in the fight.  Much to everyone’s horror, they see the girl’s spirit drift away in the night, apparently in the grasp of the villainous ghost!  Here ends one half of the tale, and here begins another.

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This is one of the neat aspects of this story.  The first half is told from the perspective of the Challengers, but the latter half follows our spectral hero, Deadman, as he relates the end of the adventure for us.  He found his way into these events by visiting his old friend at his former circus, Vashnu, a seer and mystic.  Yet, Boston Brand finds his friend locked in his thoughts, so we get a frame within a frame, as he recalls how a apprentice of his, Seth Gross, betrayed his trust and stole both his secrets and the spirit casket from him.  I think we can probably see where this is going.  Gross learned the secrets of astral projection, and used this stolen knowledge along with the casket to pose as a ghost and extort the poor professor.

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Deadman sets out to track Gross down, and he arrives just as the “ghost” is putting on his hangman act.  The spurious specter heads back to his body, but Deadman beats him to it, and uses it as leverage to force the truth out of the weasel.  Deadman is steaming mad at Gross’s misdeeds, especially because he is running a big risk that time will run out before the girl’s spirit is rejoined to her body and it could be lost forever.

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deadman 074 027Realizing that he needs an astral body in order to save her, Deadman pulls a new stun.  He batters Gross’s spirit into submission, then actually possesses the spirit itself!  The pain and strain are incredible, but he manages to reach the tower just in time to save the girl and return spirit from whence it came.

Fortunately, the girl is restored, but when Deadman frees Gross’s spirit, he’s been driven insane by the ordeal.  Whoa, that’s pretty brutal, though seeing as he was going to do more or less the same to the girl, it’s hard to feel too bad for him.  Of course, Deadman does tell us that the bogus bogey, Gross, is now doomed to wander the earth forever.  So, we end with a fairly dichotomous moment, split between the happy reunion of father and daughter and their fond farewell with the Challengers one the one hand, and the shattered psyche and spiritual doom of Seth Gross on the other.  It’s an interesting end to the tale.

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That’s not the type of thing you expect to find in Silver Age story, that’s for sure!  There’s definitely a more mature tone to this tale.  For all of its faults, it’s goofier moments, it’s stretched set-up, poorly developed villain, and the clumsy exposition that drives too much of the plot, there is definitely something here that is markedly different from that which came before.  O’Neil is, as he has in several of the previous issues, pushing for more complex and compelling storytelling.  The effort may be flawed, but it’s still noteworthy.  The final result is an uneven but undeniably interesting read.  The art is really lovely and full of personality, suitably moody and atmospheric.  The characterization doesn’t advance too much, spinning its wheels with several already-old beats, but we do get a few nice moments. All-in-all, this is a fine story, and it seems like the creative team was just was really starting to cook.  That makes it all the more lamentable that this is the last new issue.  I would have enjoyed reading more of this cast of characters’ adventures.  So, this last issue of the Challengers earns a solid 3 Minutemen out of 5.

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Well my friends, that just about does it for this greatly belated edition of Into the Bronze Age!  With any luck I’ll be able to get back on track after this, most of the work on my mods being done at this point.  The semester is beginning, but here’s hoping it will still leave me some time for this little project.  Join me next time as we travel further Into the Bronze Age!

 

 

 

Dynamite’s Shadow: Review

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I had been hearing good things about Garth Ennis’s ongoing Shadow series at Dynamite, so I finally decided to check it out.  I was extremely hesitant to read it because Ennis is one of my least favorite writers.  I know he’s very talented, but his work is usually far too ugly and vicious to be worthwhile for me.  About the only times I enjoy his work is when he’s kept on a tight leash (see, for example, the exceptional Dan Dare mini-series he penned).  Still, I do love these old pulp characters, and I decided to give it a chance.  I thought that I’d share my ruminations here with anyone who is interested.  I won’t make a regular feature out of reviews, but I’ll probably offer them occasionally, as the mood strikes me.

I’ve read the first volume, Fire of Creation, and I think I’ve got a pretty good sense of what the book is all about by this point.  There is a lot here that I really, really like.  In fact, there is so much here that I like, that I really wish it was being written by someone other than Garth Ennis, someone with a little class and a little subtlety.  There is everything here to make a good Shadow ongoing.  You’ve got a great blend of the old pulps, the radio show, and even the interesting aspects of the movie.  You’ve got plenty of personality in the villains, interesting mysteries, good action, and a mostly solid 30s feel.  The art by Aaron Campbell is serviceable, if a bit muddy, in the standard Dynamite house style, and it has some really spectacularly lovely and evocative Alex Ross covers.  Honestly, the cover may be the best part of the series.  The Shadow has never looked so good.

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All of that is good, and all of that makes me really want to like this book.  The trouble is that Garth Ennis…well, Ennises it all up.  It’s crude, ugly, tawdry, and full of the type of base material I just don’t want in my adventure stories.  It’s almost a foregone conclusion that Ennis would discard the radio show’s classic romantic tension between The Shadow and Margo Lane in favor of a cynical, emotionally abusive sexual relationship.  That was disappointing to me, but hardly unexpected.  (I’m fairly certain that bitter, cynical, and unhealthy romantic relationships are all that he knows how to write.)  The repeated dialog reminding us that one of the villains is a child molester is something else altogether.  It’s a dirty world that these characters inhabit, and one whose ugliness intrudes whenever I start to enjoy the setting.  I don’t mind the warlord governed areas of China being violent and brutal, but some subtlety in the storytelling could accomplish the same ends much more enjoyably.  I’m reminded of the gritty realism of the excellent Green Hornet: Year One series, which dealt with the Ravaging of Nanjing and the brutality of Japanese occupation in China, but did it with a lighter touch.

In terms of the protagonists, they are like everything else in the book, both interesting and a little repellent.  I love the idea of the Shadow having a personal stake in his classic catchphrase, “who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men?  The Shadow knows!”  I really like the idea brought up (to the best of my knowledge for the first time) in the movie, that he lived a terrible life before becoming the Shadow in an attempt to redeem himself.  Who knows?  He knows because he has been to the depths of human depravity, but he has dedicated himself to purging such evils from the world as recompense.  I think that’s a great backstory for the character, and I love that Ennis decided to pursue it, just as I love the Shadow’s preoccupation with redemption and atonement.  There is a compelling character in there, and Ennis does a pretty good job with it in the small amount of space he provides that element.  Nonetheless, the viciousness of other aspects of the character, especially his relationship with Margo, is troubling and unappealing.  The Shadow is downright emotionally abusive to her, and the dialog they share is almost enough to make me put down the book all by itself.

In the end, I don’t think I’m going to really enjoy this series, though perhaps it will pick up after Ennis’s departure at the end of this volume.  If you’re like me and prefer a bit more class and hope in your books, this probably isn’t for you.  If you don’t mind the uglier aspects of Ennis’s writing, then there is probably a decent book to be found here.  The grimness of these types of stories, the baseness of their content, well, it all just ends up being too much for me and, I would argue, too much for the character.  There’s a particularly telling moment towards the middle of the collection, in which a well-meaning but rather foolish character complains that the dangerous mission the protagonists had undertaken was nothing at all like what he expected.  He remarks that he expected it “to be more…rip-roaring.”  The contempt with which the Shadow greets this statement is so thick that one can’t help but imagine a sneer on the author’s face as he wrote those words.  There is, in almost every line of this book, just such a contempt for the earnest, pure-hearted, and yes, ‘rip-roaring,’ adventure fare that make the old pulp stories so endearing.  It’s an attitude that I don’t share, as I place a bit more stock in the heroic spirit and its value.  I give this first volume 2 1/2 Minutemen out of 5, a good plot but repugnant execution.

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Custom Loading and Menu Screens

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Howdy folks!  Lately, I’ve been getting a lot of questions about how to create custom loading and menu screens in Freedom Force vs The Third Reich.  There probably were tutorials once-upon-a-time, yet while there are some good threads about this on Freedom Reborn, there isn’t, to my knowledge, a good, clear, set of instructions on how to do this.

So, you want to give your mod a little extra bit of personality, replace the main menu with a picture of the Thundercats, the Teen Titans, or whatever your mod is about, right?  Well, the process is really quite simple.  Like most things with FF, these interface screens are really easy to customize.  It’s just a matter of replacing files in the right directory.  With the following instructions, you can replace the main menu screen, the Rumble Room screen, the loading screen, and every other game menu and loading screen.

  1. Make sure your mod has the right directory.  You’ll need Art\Library\Interface_Scenes, and at least some of the subfolders.  Which ones you need depends on what all you want to replace.  If you’ve begun your mod by copying FFX, you probably won’t have these files.  You can copy them out of the main FF Data folder, or you can grab them out of one of my mods (which all have at least some of these images replaced).  Now, the folders corresponding to the various loading screens are mostly intuitively named:
    1. mg_ff_team_main is the main menu screen, mg_rumble_room is the rumble room screen, and so on.Screenshot (24).png
  2. Each interface scene in the game consists of two parts, a texture, the actual image that is displayed, and a nif, or mesh file, which is the canvas upon which the texture is displayed.Screenshot (25)
    1. The texture will have a specific name that the nif tells the game to look for.
    2. Some of the scenes have animated or otherwise unusual nifs that can be hard to fit with a texture.  You’ll notice that the default main menu is like this, scrolling through a whole host of characters.
    3. You can replace these with simpler nifs from other portions of the game.  I’ve done this with the main menu in all of my mods, simply substituting a flat nif from one of the loading screens for the default nif.
      1. Of course, if you change nifs, you need to make sure the you rename the texture that goes with it appropriately so the game can find it.
      2. For example, the texture that goes with my chosen main menu nif is load_skyking.dds, while the default texture is made up of a number of different pieces each with a specific name.Screenshot (26).png
  3. To change the image displayed by your chosen interface screen, simply replace its texture with one of your choice.  It must be named exactly the same thing!
    1. All textures used in FF have to be square, with even dimensions.
    2. Interface scenes must be 1024 x 1024, .dds format.
  4. If you’re not sure how to save an image in .dds format, I recommend using GIMP, a free image editing program that can take a .dds plug-in.
    1. After installing GIMP, open your image with it, crop or scale to approriate dimensions, and then Export As a .dds file, named whatever your base texture is, i.e., load_skyking.dds.
  5. That’s it, you’re done!  Enjoy your cool new custom screens!

Well, that was easy, but what if you want to create custom loading screens for your mod’s campaign missions?  Well, this is also pretty simple, but it does require a few more steps.

  1. These files also go in your interface_scenes directory, but instead of replacing them, you actually need to create your own.
  2. Copy one of the comic_blank (comic_timemaster, comic_blitzkreig, etc) folders out of the vanilla Data folder and past it into the Art/Library/Interface_Scenes directory in your mod.
  3. You’ll see that it is a similar animal as the other interface scenes we already discussed, except instead of a nif and ONE texture, it is a nif and THREE textures.  This is what makes those cool fake comic covers for the game’s mission loading screens.
    1. The comic cover itself is broken into two pieces, and then there is a ‘back’ image which provides the background.  You need to replace the two textures with your own cover image chopped up into pieces of exactly the same dimensions.
    2. OR, you can do just like we did with the main loading screen, and simply replace the comic cover nif with a plain nif and only have to make one texture.
    3. Name your folder something fitting for your mission, avengers1, for example.
  4. Now comes the slightly more complex bit.  You’ll need to create entries in FFEdit for your brand new loading screens.
    1. Open up FFEdit, and make sure the Primary Data path points to your mod folder.  Now, click on the ‘Res’ (resources) tab, and scroll down until you see the ls_blank (NOT is_blank!) entries.
    2. Select one of these, like ls_01_begin, and click ‘copy.’
    3. Rename your new entry to be ls_yourmissionname.  Note, it must match exactly what the mission name is in the Campaign tab, so it is a good idea to switch over there, copy the mission name, and just paste it after ls_.
    4. Point the source of the entry to your newly created mission loading screen.  Make sure to trim the data path to start at ‘library’!
    5. Save, rinse, repeat for other missions.Screenshot (28)
  5. You’re done!  These should now display whenever you load one of the appropriate missions.

Marvel Adventures Almost Ready!


Howdy readers and fans!  I’m sure those of you who have been following my Into the Bronze Age feature have been wondering where I’ve been.  Well, my absence has been due to two very good causes.  The first is that my wife and I celebrated our ten year anniversary with a vacation to the national parks in Washington, which was awesome all by itself, but the second probably carries more weight with y’all.  I’ve been hard at work on a HUGE update to my Marvel mod.  It doesn’t quite double the number of missions and campaigns, but it comes very close to doubling the number of characters!


That’s right, we are close to a release date for Marvel Adventures Vol. 2, which will vastly expand the roster, offer an all new campaign featuring Spider-Man and a host of other street-level Marvel characters not included in the first edition, and a whole passel of additional missions for the existing campaigns.

The X-Men benefit from a whole new story-arc that takes them from the familiar confines of the X-Mansion to the distant stars of the Shi’ar homeworld! (Plus, a short spin-off campaign featuring solo stories!)  The Avengers meet their match in the form of the Squadron Supreme!

And, to top it all off, we now get to boast several exclusive, and ridiculously beautiful new skins by super-star skinner Afghan Ant!  So, I hope that y’all will forgive me for my absence, as I have been working day and night to get this update finished.  It’s already out to my testers for balancing, and I’m working on the last few things now.  Wish me luck and smooth sailing!

Check out the Marvel Adventures album HERE!

 

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Lost DCUG Campaign

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Howdy guys, I discovered something today while I was cleaning out some files that made me a bit wistful and nostalgic, so I thought I would share it.  Years ago I was working on my sprawling DC Universe mod, the DC Universe According to Grey, and I created the beginnings of two extra campaigns.  At some point in time, I had a computer crash and lost all of that material…except this.  I discovered a few, a very few, screenshots of one of those ill-fated missions.  This one in particular was the first mission in a Green Arrow campaign, and it featured Green Arrow, Speedy, and guest starred Black Canary.

The mission involved taking Ollie and Roy on a patrol of Star City where they would encounter various low-level thugs, meet up with the lovely Dinah Lance, and then confront Count Vertigo for the first time in the finale.  I had a short campaign plotted out, but this was the only thing done.

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I thought I might share these images with anyone interested, so we can all look at what might have been.  Perhaps one day I will get a chance to revisit this material, but I know at least one of the maps I used no longer exists.  Anyway, I’ve asked this before, but on the off chance I might hit the jackpot, I’ll ask again.  If you had an early version of the DCUG, please check your folder and see if you happen to have any of this material.  I think some of it got out into the public, but I was never able to recover it.  Well, that’s all for now.  Thanks for taking this little stroll down memory lane with me!

Into the Bronze Age: June 1970 (Part 4)

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Welcome to the fourth and final installment of my coverage of June 1970.  I’ve got an interesting pair of stories for you, so let’s get right to it, shall we?

Roll Call (You can see everything published this month HERE)

  • Action Comics #389
  • Aquaman #51
  • Batman #222
  • Detective Comics #400
  • The Flash #198
  • Green Lantern/Green Arrow #77
  • Justice League #81
  • Phantom Stranger #7
  • Showcase #91
  • Teen Titans #27
  • World’s Finest #194

Bolded entries are covered in this post, the others will be covered soon.

Teen Titans #27

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Writer: Robert Kanigher
Penciler: Nick Cardy
Inker: Nick Cardy
Letterer: Ben Oda

Well, I wasn’t looking forward to this one; I’ll admit it.  Despite that, I also have to admit that this issue isn’t as bad as the previous one, though the stupidity of that story hangs around this one’s neck like an albatross.  This story is just…odd.  It is decidedly NOT a Teen Titans tale.  This is one of those late 60s space exploration movies, the ones that attempted to stay close to science fact.  You could easily pull the Titans out of this book and replace them with any generic space explorers, and it wouldn’t affect the plot one bit.  They don’t use their powers, they don’t don their costumes, and they don’t really DO anything.

Essentially, this entire story is marking time and reversing the unparalleled idiocy displayed by Mal last issue.  His pointless gesture of needless self-sacrifice, sneaking aboard to pilot a remote controlled space shot for Venus, prompts a frantic effort to save his demonstrably worthless hide.  The space program embarks on a crash construction project to create a new spacecraft to intercept and rescue Mal, saving him from his own stupidity.  (And you thought they went to a lot of trouble to save Mark Watney!)  The Titans are chosen to crew it instead of, you know, someone qualified.  They debate the worthiness of the young man’s actions as they prepare, somehow treating this whole ridiculous situation as if it had even the slightest shred of justification.  The best defense that his supporters can marshal is that Mal is ‘doing his thing.’  Yeah.  Great.  That’s tremendously compelling.

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I suppose I may be letting my bitterness about how asinine this entire story-line is show through a bit too much here.  I’m sorry, but as I’ve said, if there’s one thing I can’t stand, it’s logical inconsistency.  Well, the powers that be get the rocket built in time, and the Titans blast off, dropping a team off at the Moon for no discernible reason while Dove mans the controls of the main module, awaiting their rendezvous with Mal’s ship.  We get a two page roundup of the last several issues, and then we’re back in the present, and the present is mostly space procedural stuff.  You’ve got various readings being taken and reported, orders shouted, numbers and tossed back and forth, the usual.  Clearly, as we discovered with that Robin tale a while back, NASA and Apollo are on the brain for the creators and fans of 1970.

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Speedy, Hawk, and Wonder Girl (or generic astronaut’s 1, 2, and 3), the Moon team, land for their vague mission, but they discover that the materials left behind by Apollo 11 have mysteriously vanished!  The boys head out to search the area while the Amazing Amazon holds the fort.  The search proves fruitless, but when the two teens come back to the LM, they discover that the Lady Vanishes!  That’s right, Wonder Girl has disappeared as mysteriously as the Apollo 11 gear.

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Meanwhile, Kid Flash and deadweight, err, I mean Lilith, meet up with Mal.  The Fastest Teen Alive spacewalks to rescue their friend, but his tether to the module snaps.  He has to pilot them across space with a small jet propulsion device.  That’s right, he pulled an Iron Man, predating The Martian by about 40 years.

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We cut back to the Moon as those kids make their way back to the main craft, and we discover that a group of rather cool looking aliens, too well designed for the minor role they’re given, are the source of the strange happenings on Luna.  They appear carrying all of the missing items, including an unharmed Wonder Girl.  The creatures turn out to be friendly, and they share their story, which involved them leaving their home world to pursue strange radio signals, only to crash-land on Earth’s satellite.  They took the devices left behind by Apollo 11 to try to repair their ship, but when Wonder Girl explained things to them, they brought everything back.

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The kids depart, promising to send help soon (Superman could just give them a tow, I suppose), and all of the disparate craft link up, prompting their return journey, but not before Kid Flash earns some chauvinist points by responding to Wonder Girl’s statement that she was so happy to see him that she could kiss him by saying “Just like a doll!  Thinking of kisses when we’re still over the Moon!”  Classy Wally.

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On the way home, their oxygen mixture is off, and it drives them temporarily mad, setting them at each other’s throats.  Fortunately, the young speedster manages to have enough presence of mind to fix the problem, and they all make it home, safe and sound, where Mal will surely be thrown in jail for the rest of his natural life for stealing a multi-million dollar spacecraft and causing the expenditure of untold further sums to rescue his stupid self….at least, if there were any justice in the world…We end with an ambiguous tease for next issue that features little more than a woman screaming.

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This wasn’t a bad issue, taken strictly on its own merits, but not much happened and it was not, as I said, really a Teen Titans story.  The Nick Cardy art is beautiful, of course, though it makes me miss his Aquaman stories a bit.  This tale is fairly realistic, minus the aliens, and the attention to scientific detail, as well as the connections to the real and recent history of the space program, was surprising.  Unfortunately, it didn’t make for the most gripping of stories.  Of course, the whole of it is weighted down by the fact that the event that drives all of the action is insufferably stupid.  I’m looking forward to this current direction changing, as it doesn’t have much to recommend it.  The idea of these young heroes having to wrestle with the consequences of their actions is a promising one.  We’ve just seen an incredible movie dealing with the similar themes of the consequences of the use of powers in the form of Captain America: Civil War.  Clearly, the idea has legs.  This odd, pointless set of tales, however, aren’t worthy of setup.  I’ll give this particular story 2 Minutemen.  I’m taking off half a Minute for Mal’s imbecility.

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World’s Finest #194

World's_Finest_Comics_194.jpgCover Artist: Kurt Swan
Writer: Bob Haney
Penciler: Ross Andru
Inker: Mike Esposito

This was a surprisingly fun story.  I read it a while back, and it didn’t make a big impression on me.  It is by no means the height of comic craft, but it is definitely solid quality Zaney Haney, fun and not too insane.  It holds together reasonably well and displays Haney’s mastery of creating interesting, memorable one-shot characters.  The tale features the World’s Finest team with all of their vast power facing off against the overwhelming threat of…the Mafia?  That’s right, we continue this month’s trend of superheroes fighting non-super threats.  At least this feels somewhat fitting for Batman, and it also seems like the type of thing that Superman would involve himself in if it was necessary.  He’s really a ‘no job too small’ kind of guy.

The issue opens with young Dick Grayson doing a familiar act, but one which the world has not seen for some time.  He is back as the last member of the Flying Graysons, performing at a circus for charity.  At the same time, Batman is there, keeping an eye out for anything untoward, as the circus owner, a fellow named P.J. Farnum (get it?) has been pressured by the mob.  Suddenly, while Batman is distracted by a hood threatening Mr. Farnum, the Teen Wonder finds himself facing the same deadly fate that claimed his family!  The wires for his high-flying act have been sabotaged, and he begins plummeting through the air.  He hits the safety net, but it too has been cut!  The last Grayson continues his perilous plunge toward a seemingly intractable fate, but at the last moment he is rescued by…a clown?!?

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That’s right, Superman was on hand as backup, undercover as a clown puttering around the ring in a little car.  It’s a fun visual to see Superman half in the disguise, looking goofy, but smiling and waving to the crowd.  There’s something rather fitting for the Man of Steel, that he would be so unconcerned with his appearance and reputation that he would dress up in a silly costume and hang around in the background, getting no attention and no accolades.  It’s silly, but it’s rather nice.

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Unfortunately, the mafioso responsible for this “accident” slipped away, but he is only a small fish in a the growing problem of the Mafia.  The World’s Finest team decide that they must put a stop to this sinister organization, and they point out that it isn’t just a matter of busting heads, as these guys are professionals, very slick and very careful.  Even if they catch the rank and file goons, the organization continues because the folks at the top are protected by the law, seemingly being legitimate businessmen.  Of course, one would be forgiven for thinking that this really shouldn’t be that much of a problem for Batman, who could just make the mob leader cry like little girls, whether he could prove anything or not, but we’re still dealing with a fairly Silver Age-y Batman here, one who lounges around eating oranges while Hanging out with Superman, and who also plays much more by the rules.

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Anyway, the heroes decide to have the World’s Greatest Detective and master of disguise infiltrate the Mob…ohh, wait, no, they decide to have Superman do that…yep, Superman disguises himself as a forger and arranges an ‘introduction’ to the mob by faking a job on one of their banks.  His chutzpah and skills impress the boss, and he gets an introduction to Karl Lukaz, the “Big Uncle” who runs the organization, a rather distinctive looking fellow with an eye-patch and a soft spot for canaries.  It is in this fellow that we see Haney’s ability to create memorable supporting characters for these brief, passing roles.  However, the boss of bosses doesn’t welcome the incognito Man of Tomorrow with open arms.  No, he has to pass a loyalty test.  Now, what would be a fitting test for a forger?  Perhaps, forging something?  No, no, nothing so mundane.  Lukaz wants his new friend to murder Bruce Wayne!  Dun dun, dunnnnn!

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That’s right, he wants the forger to do some contract killing.  How did this guy end up running a criminal empire?  Every manager worth his salt knows you should let employees stick to their specialties!  Well, the disguised Metropolis Marvel arranges with his friend for Bruce Wayne to be “killed” during a charity polo match, and the supposed playboy billionaire’s horse is quietly tranquilized, sending him on a terrible tumble.

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Despite “Big Uncle” pulling a surprise inspection of Wayne’s body in the morgue, the deception holds, thanks to Batman’s foresight.  For his troubles, Clark learns of a secret stash of evidence that Lukaz uses to ensure the loyalty of his “nephews,” a stash that would provide the authorities just what they need to take the entire organization down.  The hero bends all of his efforts to locating this Damoclean Sword of evidence, but despite using his abilities in many clever and creative ways (subtly scanning with x-ray vision, reading computer tapes with microscopic vision, and more) he has no luck.  It seems “Big Uncle” is too smart to leave his Achilles Heel unprotected.

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Meanwhile, Batman is beginning to act a bit strangely.  It seems the fall from his horse didn’t do him any favors, and he is having terrible head pains.  Nevertheless, at Superman’s urging, the Dark Knight agrees to infiltrate the Mob as well.  One does wonder why this wasn’t the first plan.  After passing Lukaz’s test with some quick thinking and smooth talking, Batman is in position, but his efforts also turn up nothing, so the pair decide to put “Big Uncle” on ice in the Fortress of Solitude and have the Masked Manhunter take his place in hopes of weaseling the information they need out of Lukaz’s lieutenants.

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I love the thought of Superman just dropping a criminal off in the Fortress.  It’s hilarious and strangely sensible.  After all, where are they going to go?  Anyway, a meeting of the major crime bosses sees Batman’s head-trauma bear bizarre fruit, as he shows up in costume, but still disguised as Lukaz.  What’s more, he exposes Superman and presents him with a kryptonite funeral wreath, leaving us on a strange cliff-hanger!  What has happened to the World’s Greatest Detective and what will become of the World’s Finest team?!

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This was a fun issue, though it was a bit odd and silly around the edges.  The idea that Superman would be the one to go undercover really is rather strange, especially since his partner is the World’s Greatest Detective.  It does feel a bit like burying the lead.  Despite that, I enjoyed seeing Clark having to reason his way through his challenges, using his powers in subtle, careful, and thoughtful ways.  He can’t just punch his way through this problem.  Instead, he has to be clever, and I enjoy seeing Superman employ his brains.  Batman doesn’t get all that much to do, and his head-blow induced personality change (not quite right for the Head-Blow Headcount, sadly!) is an old device.  I’m curious to see where it will take us next issue.  This was enjoyable, and Haney managed to give the mob boss some personality instead of having him just be a stock character, the generic gangster type.  It was definitely a step up from last month!  All things considered, I’ll give this one 3 Minutemen.

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Final Thoughts:

So, how did this set of issues seem to y’all, my fine readers?  Personally, I think this was a pretty strong month.  We had some great stories, like JLA and Aquaman, and we also had a delightful surprise with Manhunter 2070!  That by itself was enough to make this month memorable.  In addition, we had a much more famous debut, with the introduction of Man-Bat.  Even though that comic wasn’t necessarily the greatest, it was exciting to see a classic symbol of the Bronze Age make his first appearance.  Of course, we also had some clunkers, like Teen Titans and GL/GA.  Yet, even missteps like these are beginning to look different.

These aren’t just groaners like the occasional bad Superman comic, overly goofy Silver Age pieces outliving their era.  No, these are issues that are much more the outworkings of a certain climate of ideas, products of their time.  As ham-handed as O’Neil’s writing was in the Green Lantern book, he was trying to wrestle with interesting and challenging themes.  In the same way, the Teen Titans book, despite the stupidity of the driving force of its plot, was a love letter to the space race and the culture’s obsession with the subject.

Though there wasn’t as clear of a common theme as there was last month, there were definitely some interesting trends to be noticed.  We saw hints of the social tensions of the day in the Batgirl backup and even, in a very subtle way, in Aquaman, with the Girl Friday’s shocking willingness to kill purely for the sake of prejudice.  Of course, we mustn’t forget the trendy Batman story featuring the Beatles…errr….I mean the “Twists.”  All told, this was a fun, interesting month, with some good touchstones for the changing culture and the changing genre.  Of course, we’re still seeing inconsistencies across the board, with certain characters evolving in one book but not another.  I’m curious how long such disconnects will continue.

Well, that’s it for June 1970!  I hope you enjoyed this trip with me, Into the Bronze Age!  Please join me next week as we begin our examination of July!

 

The Head-Blow Headcount:

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We had Batgirl join the not so illustrious company of the Wall of Shame this month, though Robin is still in the lead.